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30 traits of an Empath (How to know if you're an Empath)

30 traits of an Empath (How to know if you're an Empath)
By: Christel Broederlow What is an empath? Being an empath is when you are affected by other people’s energies, and have an innate ability to intuitively feel and perceive others. Your life is unconsciously influenced by others’ desires, wishes, thoughts, and moods. Being an empath is much more than being highly sensitive and it’s not just limited to emotions. Empaths can perceive physical sensitivities and spiritual urges, as well as just knowing the motivations and intentions of other people. Empaths are often quiet achievers. However, they can be the exact opposite: reclusive and apparently unresponsive at the best of times. Empaths have a tendency to openly feel what is outside of them more so than what is inside of them. Empaths are more inclined to pick up another’s feelings and project it back without realizing its origin in the first place. Empaths are sensitive to TV, videos, movies, news and broadcasts. Here are the listeners of life. Here are 30 of the most common traits: 1.

http://themindunleashed.org/2013/10/30-traits-of-empath.html

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You are missed — Better Humans “Something feels missing from my life but I can’t quite put my finger on it.” I can’t tell you how many times I hear some variation of that every week. (It’s a lot.) I hear it from tech entrepreneurs who are on the verge of burn out, writers who are experiencing a temporary block, photographers who are making a ton of money working with big brands, and designers who have a full plate of client work. I hear it from friends at Facebook, at Google, and at Apple. After listening to unique story after story, and each person attempting to describe what is happening in their life, it dawned on me that what was missing from every single story was very simple.

Empathic people are natural targets for sociopaths - protect yourself © Fotolia Olly The empathy trap: therapists and counselors almost by definition are empathic, to facilitate clients' recovery - but this quality can mean those carers are targets for sociopaths, aided by what Dr Jane & Tim McGregor call "apaths". The first UK article on this cruel sport shows how to identify and thus avoid it. People targeted by a sociopath often respond with self-deprecating comments like "I was stupid", "what was I thinking" of "I should've listened to my gut instinct". But being involved with a sociopath is like being brainwashed.

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