background preloader

How to see what government agency is spying on your phone

How to see what government agency is spying on your phone

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CP1j04_X4Oo

Related:  Surveillance IIShort Viewesalyn

Can the NSA and CIA use your phone to track your location? July 26, 2011, 12:43 PM — There's no need to panic, or start shopping for aluminum-foil headwear, but the super-secret National Security Agency has apparently been thinking frequently enough about whether the NSA is allowed to intercept location data from cell phones to track U.S. citizens that the agency's chief lawyer was able to speak intelligently about it off the cuff while interviewing for a different job. "There are certain circumstances where that authority may exist," even if the NSA has no warrant to investigate a the person whose privacy it is invading or global permission to eavesdrop on everyone, according to Matthew Olsen, the NSA's general counsel. He didn't come to talk about that particularly; he said it yesterday in response to a question from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, which was considering whether he'd be a good choice to run the National Counterterrorism Center. So far, though, no law.

The Omnivorous Mind — John S. Allen In this gustatory tour of human history, John S. Allen demonstrates that the everyday activity of eating offers deep insights into human beings’ biological and cultural heritage. We humans eat a wide array of plants and animals, but unlike other omnivores we eat with our minds as much as our stomachs. NSA Devises Radio Pathway Into Computers not connected to the internet By DAVID E. SANGER and THOM SHANKER WASHINGTON — The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the United States to conduct surveillance on those machines and can also create a digital highway for launching cyberattacks. While most of the software is inserted by gaining access to computer networks, the N.S.A. has increasingly made use of a secret technology that enables it to enter and alter data in computers even if they are not connected to the Internet, according to N.S.A. documents, computer experts and American officials. The technology, which the agency has used since at least 2008, relies on a covert channel of radio waves that can be transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards inserted surreptitiously into the computers. In some cases, they are sent to a briefcase-size relay station that intelligence agencies can set up miles away from the target.

Do We Have the NSA on the Run, or Is a Much Worse Surveillance State in the Making? December 20, 2013 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Earlier this week, Obama's hand-picked panel charged with reviewing the nation's surveillance state issued a set of recommendations that includes limiting the indiscriminate mass collection of telephone records and other reforms.

Introducing the Knowledge Graph: things, not strings Cross-posted on the Inside Search Blog Search is a lot about discovery—the basic human need to learn and broaden your horizons. But searching still requires a lot of hard work by you, the user. So today I’m really excited to launch the Knowledge Graph, which will help you discover new information quickly and easily. Take a query like [taj mahal]. For more than four decades, search has essentially been about matching keywords to queries. To a search engine the words [taj mahal] have been just that—two words.

The 3 rules of a secure cell phone Big brother is coming after your phone. The government is increasingly interested in your calls, your movements, and your purchases. Don’t believe me? They don’t even need a warrant to seize your records anymore: Think about this: you probably have your credit locked (or you should!) Catalog Reveals NSA Has Back Doors for Numerous Devices Editor's note: This article accompanies our main feature story on the NSA's Tailored Access Operations unit. You can read it here. When it comes to modern firewalls for corporate computer networks, the world's second largest network equipment manufacturer doesn't skimp on praising its own work. According to Juniper Networks' online PR copy, the company's products are "ideal" for protecting large companies and computing centers from unwanted access from outside. They claim the performance of the company's special computers is "unmatched" and their firewalls are the "best-in-class." Despite these assurances, though, there is one attacker none of these products can fend off -- the United States' National Security Agency.

The future of UI Synopsis It's 10 years since Minority Report hit our screens. The film's science adviser and inventor John Underkoffler demos g-speak – the real-life version of the eye-popping, tai chi-meets-cyberspace computer interface that Tom Cruise used to whoosh through video clips of future crimes. Is this how tomorrow's computers will be controlled? Talk recorded 11 February 2010. About the Speaker

Related: