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Les MOOC, déjà has-been ?

Les MOOC, déjà has-been ?

http://www.journaldunet.com/management/formation/mooc-depasses.shtml

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Watch celebrities become hideously ugly as strange 'flashed face' video effect works its horrible magic By Rob Waugh Published: 17:13 GMT, 22 May 2012 | Updated: 18:22 GMT, 22 May 2012 Liv Tyler's face warps into the image of hideous old crone, and Tom Cruise's chin distorts beyond all recognition. No, it isn't a vision of the future - it's a strange effect achieved by looking at a space 'between' flashing pictures of human faces. 'We aligned a set of faces at the eyes and started to skim through them. After a few seconds, we noticed that some of the faces began to appear highly deformed and grotesque,' say the University of Queensland researchers who uncovered the effect.

The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype - Technology Dave Chidley for The Chronicle Paul Gries, of the U. of Toronto, has taught MOOCs on computer science. By Steve Kolowich What is it like to teach 10,000 or more students at once, and does it really work? The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom.

After Setbacks, Online Courses Are Rethought A study of a million users of massive open online courses, known as MOOCs, released this month by the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education found that, on average, only about half of those who registered for a course ever viewed a lecture, and only about 4 percent completed the courses. Much of the hope — and hype — surrounding MOOCs has focused on the promise of courses for students in poor countries with little access to higher education. But a separate survey from the University of Pennsylvania released last month found that about 80 percent of those taking the university’s MOOCs had already earned a degree of some kind. And perhaps the most publicized MOOC experiment, at San Jose State University, has turned into a flop. It was a partnership announced with great fanfare at a January news conference featuring Gov.

About Scientific Humanities Week 1: How to patrol the borderline between science and politics? Week 2: How to find one’s way in the scientific literature? Week 3: How to handle technical innovations? Week 4: How to deal with controversies? Week 5: Feedback: Bruno Latour comments on your blogs What Will Happen to MOOCs Now that Udacity Is Leaving Higher Ed? Online Learning | Feature What Will Happen to MOOCs Now that Udacity Is Leaving Higher Ed? Sebastian Thrun threw a wrench in the MOOC model by declaring that massive open online courses don't work for higher education. What's next for the online learning trend? By John K. Waters12/11/13

Smartphone Projector Ever wanted to project your favourite movie onto the wall while you’re snuggled up in bed using just your phone? Or thought it would be cool to show your mates funny fail videos but sometimes there’s just too many of them to crowd around a small screen? Smartphone Projector has been designed by Luckies of London to create intimate screenings any time, any place. Whether you want to set up visuals for a house party or simply watch music videos with your friends, Smartphone Projector is the answer. Go hands free, put your feet up and view at up to 8 x magnification. Get more from your smart phone with the original, lo-fi, D.I.Y Smart Phone projector.

learning, networks, knowledge, technology, community The Learning Analytics and Knowledge conference (LAK16) is happening this week in Edinburgh. I unfortunately, due to existing travel and other commitments, am not in attendance. I have great hope for the learning analytics field as one that will provide significant research for learning and help us move past naive quantitative and qualitative assessments of research and knowledge. I see LA as a bricolage of skills, techniques, and academic/practitioner domains. It is a multi-faceted approach of learning exploration and one where anyone with a stake in the future of learning can find an amenable conversation and place to research. Since I am missing LAK16, and feeling nostalgic, I want to share my reflections of how LAK and the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR) became the influential agencies that they now are in learning research.

The MOOC Phenomenon: Who Takes Massive Open Online Courses and Why? by Gayle Christensen, Andrew Steinmetz, Brandon Alcorn, Amy Bennett, Deirdre Woods, Ezekiel J Emanuel Gayle Christensen Office of the Provost, University of Pennsylvania Andrew Steinmetz Can Facebook’s Massive Courses Improve Education For Developing Nations? Facebook is on a mission to prove that social media-empowered education can help some of the poorest nations on Earth. It recently announced a big industry and Ivy League alliance to bring experimental educational software to Rwanda, providing Internet access and world-class instructional resources to their country’s eager students. However, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) aren’t yet proven to work at scale even in the most well-resourced nations, let alone in a country with uneven access to technology and arguably limited educational opportunities. We took a look at what experts and evidence had to say about the prospects of Facebook’s education project. The most realistic outcome for such an unpredictable endeavor is that Facebook will unearth naturally talented students whose contributions never could have been realized without the opportunity.

EDUcourses Launches Donations Appeal to Create a College Education at Tuition of $39.95 Per Course EDUcourses Launches Donations Appeal to Create a College Education at Tuition of $39.95 Per Course Florida-based EDUcourses aims to disseminate 27 MOOCs – at an average cost of $39.95 per course – by the end of 2015. Gainesville, FL, December 03, 2013 --(PR.com)-- Dr. Latest News Joe Paterno, the man who for decades was synonymous with Penn State football and was known by the college football world as just "JoePa", has died. Paterno, 85, had been receiving chemotherapy as part of his treatment for lung cancer, and complications from that treatment claimed the longtime Penn State coach's life on Saturday. Paterno was the head coach of Penn State for 46 seasons before being fired in November as his role in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal came under greater scrutiny. Combined with the time he spent as an assistant, Paterno spent a total of 61 years on the Penn State sidelines. He left behind a legacy that, on the field of play, was unparalleled in Division I football. Paterno holds the all-time Division I record for football coaching wins with a 409-136-3 record, and he won two national championships while going undefeated in five different seasons.

03. CCK08 - The Distributed Course - The MOOC Guide The Connectivism and Connective Knowledge course (CCK08) was the first to incorporate open learning with distributed content, making it the first true MOOC. It attracted 2200 participants worldwide. Distributed Content Penn GSE Study Shows MOOCs Have Relatively Few Active Users, With Only a Few Persisting to Course End Contact: Kat Stein, Exec. Director of Communicationskatstein@gse.upenn.edu / (215) 898-9642 Austin, Texas, December 5, 2013—Emerging data from a University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education (Penn GSE) study show that massive open online courses (MOOCs) have relatively few active users, that user “engagement” falls off dramatically—especially after the first 1-2 weeks of a course—and that few users persist to the course end.

Learn to Code with Harvard’s Intro to Computer Science Course And Other Free Tech Classes I’ll confess, when it comes to computers, I’m pretty much strictly a user. And these days, with the potential freedom and creatively afforded by open access software, the endless hacks for virtually everything, and the availability of free online computer classes, that seems like kind of a lame admission. So I’m tempted to rectify my programming ignorance by pushing through what promises to be a rigorous intro to computer science, CS50, Harvard’s introductory course for both majors and non-majors alike. The course offers a broad knowledge base to build on, as you can see from the description below: Topics include abstraction, algorithms, encapsulation, data structures, databases, memory management, security, software development, virtualization, and websites. Languages include C, PHP, and JavaScript plus SQL, CSS, and HTML.

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