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6 Free Tools to Easily Cite Resources for Students and Researchers Citing resources is an important skill for the 21st century students and for any other learner or researcher. I have already included it in my ebook " The 21St Century Skills Teachers and Students Need to Have ". It is a fact universally acknowledged that citing resources nowadays is way harder than it used to be when technology was not a huge issue. As technology crouches into our life, new ways of communication emerge giving birth to novel content providers. We have now blog posts, online newspapers, ebooks, tweets, emails,.. and several other forms where learners can get the information they want. Do they know how to properly cite these new resources is where the shoe pinches.

13 Great Twitter Chats Every Educator Should Check Out Education Twitter chats take place when a group of educators "meet" on Twitter at an agreed upon time, using an agreed upon hashtag, to discuss topics of interest in education. Twitter chats range from small discussions with only a few participants to huge conversations with dozens or even hundreds of educators taking part! They provide a unique opportunity for educators to discuss specific topics of interest and connect with colleagues around the world. The word from educators in the trenches is that these chats are making a profound difference in how educators are improving their professional practice, providing ideas, resources and inspiration in ways never thought possible.

11 Ways to use Symbaloo in the Classroom – The Edublogger NOTE: This is a guest post by Mimi Chau from the Symbaloo team. Edublogs just rolled out a free Symbaloo plugin available to all users that we think you’ll enjoy! What is Symbaloo? Symbaloo is a free social bookmarking tool. A fun and simple way to organize and store all your digital resources in the cloud. You can categorize your resources, share and access them from any device. Educational Hash Tags #edude#eduFollowChallenge#edugreen #eduhashtag #eduit#edumindset#eduON (Ontario)#euduoz #edupd#edupreneur#edupunk #edutech #EduThingsILike#eduvc#eduvoxers #elemchat #elementary#elemsci #ell #ellchat#elrnchat #elt#eltchat#eltpics#emchat #emotionalliteracy#edpolitics #engagechat#engchat #engedu #EngineeringEducation#english #english-teacher#engsschat #enrichingkids#enviroed#e-safety#ESCchat#esdgc#esea#esl #esol#esp#ETAS#etcchat#ETcoaches#etmchat#ettipad #e20#expandedlearning

Video Archive By Category MacMost includes more than 900 free video tutorials on how to use your Mac, iPad, iPhone and other Apple technology. Select a category below, or search above to find a tutorial and learn how to get the most from your Mac! Also: Accessories (2), Accounts (2), Contacts (3), Disk Utility (1), Dock (2), dvds (1), iBooks (3), iBooks Author (1), iDVD (1), Internet (3), LaunchPad (1), Mac Applications (2), Mac Apps (3), Mac Hardware (3), Maps (1), Messages (2), Mission Control (1), Networking (1), PDF (2), Photo (1), Photos (2), Printing (3), Support (2), Switching (1), Utilities (2), Video Editing (3), Widgets (3).

Twitter 101: Understanding the Basics posted by Elizabeth Harper on May 17, 2013 in Tech 101, Computers and Software, Phones and Mobile, Mobile Apps, Android Apps, iPhone/iPad Apps, Windows Phone Apps, Guides & Reviews, Social Networking :: 1 comment If you're online—and reading this!—you've probably heard of Twitter. But just what is Twitter for? How does it work? And how do you get started using it?

Internet Catalogue The date and time of chats is determined by the organizer of the chat. A lot of times they poll those on the hashtag about what day and time they would prefer. Most chats are held once a week. There are exceptions such as #mathchat which has a rerun on another day. Some chats will occur twice in the same day to aid different time zones. Some of these chats are: #edchat, and #ELTchat The A-Z Dictionary of Educational Twitter Hashtags Whether you’re a new or seasoned Twitter user, you likely come across confusing hashtags that probably look like a bunch of nonsense. First, What’s A Hashtag? The # symbol, called a hashtag, is used to mark keyword or topic in a Tweet. Any Twitter user can categorize or follow topics with hashtags.Those hashtags (usually) mean something and are a great way to get a tweet to appear in search results or discussion monitoring.

Wind Map An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software. Please do not use the map or its data to fly a plane, sail a boat, or fight wildfires :-) If the map is missing or seems slow, we recommend the latest Chrome browser.

8 Tips to Create a Twitter-Driven School Culture Author's Note: Thanks to Joe Manko, Liberty Elementary School principal, for inspiring this blog post during an impromptu edcamp at #SXSWEdu this year. For an example of a school trying to create a connected culture through Twitter, follow Liberty Elementary's hashtag and jump into the conversation. Twitter is one of the most powerful tools that you can use for your professional development -- 24/7. It's estimated that hundreds of thousands of educators around the world are currently using Twitter to connect, share, and collaborate. While it's fantastic that educators are flocking to Twitter, many of them still feel even more alone and isolated within their own school and district. There's an unfortunate inverse trend I've noticed in education: the more connected you are on Twitter, the less support and collaboration you tend to have within your school.

September , 2015 Google Forms is a powerful tool with huge educational potential for teachers and educators. Besides being free and easy to use, Forms works across different devices and is seamlessly integrated with other Drive services such as Docs and Spreadsheets. As a teacher, you can use Forms for a variety of purposes including: planning an event, making surveys and polls, creating quizzes, collecting feedback and other information from students and many more. We have already posted a step by step guide on how to create a form from scratch but since then Google Forms has witnessed some major updates with the addition of some amazing features most important of which is the last update a few days ago. Therefore, we deemed it important to revisit this guide and update you on the different features you can use to create a form in the Google Forms.

Educational Discourse I’ve recently began the #dcmooc – Digital Citizenship and am looking forward to the connecting and learning. The prompt for this week was: What are your goals for #DCMOOC, and what will you do to achieve them? My response had covered three areas: Deeper learning, Connections, Reflection. The reflection part I hope to capture, to some degree, here. But to do that, I’ll have to write. About my learning.

20 Common Grammar Mistakes That (Almost) Everyone Makes I’ve edited a monthly magazine for more than six years, and it’s a job that’s come with more frustration than reward. If there’s one thing I am grateful for — and it sure isn’t the pay — it’s that my work has allowed endless time to hone my craft to Louis Skolnick levels of grammar geekery. As someone who slings red ink for a living, let me tell you: grammar is an ultra-micro component in the larger picture; it lies somewhere in the final steps of the editing trail; and as such it’s an overrated quasi-irrelevancy in the creative process, perpetuated into importance primarily by bitter nerds who accumulate tweed jackets and crippling inferiority complexes. But experience has also taught me that readers, for better or worse, will approach your work with a jaundiced eye and an itch to judge. While your grammar shouldn’t be a reflection of your creative powers or writing abilities, let’s face it — it usually is.

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