background preloader

Online Safety Guide

Online Safety Guide
Home / Kids' Safety / Safety Guide Keeping children safe on the Internet is everyone's job. Parents need to stay in close touch with their kids as they explore the Internet.Teachers need to help students use the Internet appropriately and safely.Community groups, including libraries, after-school programs, and others should help educate the public about safe surfing.Kids and teens need to learn to take responsibility for their own behavior -- with guidance from their families and communities.It's not at all uncommon for kids to know more about the Internet and computers than their parents or teachers. If that's the case in your home or classroom, don't despair. You can use this as an opportunity to turn the tables by having your child teach you a thing or two about the Internet. Ask her where she likes to go on the Internet and what she thinks you might enjoy on the Net. A little perspective from a parent who's been there The challenges posed by the Internet can be positive.

http://kids.getnetwise.org/safetyguide/

Related:  Internet Safety & PrivacyCyberbullyingcyber safety

Protecting Your Child’s Privacy Online As a parent, you have control over the personal information companies collect online from your kids under 13. The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act gives you tools to do that. The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the COPPA Rule. If a site or service is covered by COPPA, it has to get your consent before collecting personal information from your child and it has to honor your choices about how that information is used. What is COPPA? The COPPA Rule was put in place to protect kids’ personal information on websites and online services — including apps — that are directed to children under 13.

Let's Stop Bullying: Advice for Young People Let's stop Advice for Young People Nobody has the right to hurt other people by hitting them, kicking them, calling them names, spreading rumours about them or by doing anything else which is intended to be upsetting. Bullies try to justify their actions by saying that it is their victim's fault for being different. They may pick on someone who is tall or small, or fat or thin, or wears glasses, or has a different accent, or another religion, or is shy or clever, or good looking, or disabled or . . . Any excuse will do, and if there is no real difference then the bullies will invent one.

Cyber Bullying Statistics Cyber bullying statistics refers to Internet bullying. Cyber bullying is a form of teen violence that can do lasting harm to young people. Bullying statistics show that cyber bullying is a serious problem among teens. By being more aware of cyber bullying, teens and adults can help to fight it. Welcome, Parents You don’t have to be a computer expert to keep your child safe online. You can help your child become a responsible, ethical digital citizen with healthy online relationships. To do that, you’ll use the same successful parenting skills that you’re already using at home. Resilient digital citizens recognize and seek out the 3Cs—appropriate contact, content, and conduct—in all digital settings (e.g., iPods,instant messaging, chat, computer games, game consoles, cell phones, text messaging, webcams). To help you teach your children to safely and ethically use their digital devices, iKeepSafe has created the following programs:

No Cookies To use this website, cookies must be enabled in your browser. To enable cookies, follow the instructions for your browser below. Enabling Cookies in Internet Explorer 7, 8 & 9 Open the Internet BrowserClick Tools > Internet Options > Privacy > AdvancedCheck Override automatic cookie handlingFor First-party Cookies and Third-party Cookies click AcceptClick OK and OK 10 ways schools are teaching internet safety "The student’s job is to figure out which website is the hoax. After students have looked at all three websites and figured out which one is the hoax, they share what they found with their classmates," says one reader in describing a hands-on lesson. As internet use has become a daily part of most students’ lives, students must know how to protect themselves and their identity at all times—especially when teachers and parents aren’t there to help them. Teaching students about internet safety has been important for as long as the internet has existed, but it’s in the spotlight this year in particular as schools get ready to apply for 2012 eRate discounts on their telecommunications services and internet access. That’s because applicants must amend their existing internet safety policies by July 1, 2012, to include information about how they are educating students about proper online behavior, cyber bullying, and social networking sites. 1.

Child Safety - Age-Appropriate Tips Home > Security > Microsoft products help protect your computer from malware Home > Security > Security products and services: Frequently asked questions Home > Security > Upgrade to Internet Explorer 8 to help protect your computer Home > Security > Spyware protection with Microsoft Security Essentials

Snapchat and Periscope: A Grown-Up’s Guide GREETINGS, FELLOW adult! We’re here to discuss the latest development in social media: broadcasting your life. (If you’re a teenager and still reading, please go LOL in that corner with the beanbag chairs.) Whoa, hold on, isn’t this already happening, you ask? Don’t the huevos rancheros that I posted to Instagram count as self-broadcasting?

The Five Biggest Threats to Your Kids’ Privacy, and What You Can Do About Them Remember back in school, when your teachers warned that everything you did would go on your permanent record? It turns out your teachers have become right. That permanent record is the Internet. It’s hard to be a fully functioning adult in 2014 and not leave behind a digital trail. Now imagine how hard it is for your kids, who have never known a world where the net did not exist. Parent Guide to Internet Safety Dear Parent: Our children are our nation’s most valuable asset. They represent the bright future of our country and hold our hopes for a better nation. Our children are also the most vulnerable members of society. Protecting our children against the fear of crime and from becoming victims of crime must be a national priority.

Bullying, Students with Disabilities, and Federal Law - Cyberbullying Research Center Posted by Sameer Hinduja on May 6, 2015 At a recent conference in Chester County, Pennsylvania, I had the privilege of getting to know Andy Faust, who is an authority on special education law at Sweet, Stevens, Katz & Williams LLP. In particular, I was impressed by his level of expertise and intrigued by his astute observations about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and how some kids who are bullied – and some kids who bully others – may be entitled to the federal law’s protections as “children with disabilities.” I told Andy that no one is really talking about the reality and implications of this in my circles, and that it is worth sharing to our readership so that they can fully understand the situation. So, he and I have been going back and forth to flesh this out, and his insights are as follows: Among those characteristics are:

How to Keep Your Personal Information Secure Protecting your personal information can help reduce your risk of identity theft. There are four main ways to do it: know who you share information with; store and dispose of your personal information securely, especially your Social Security number; ask questions before deciding to share your personal information; and maintain appropriate security on your computers and other electronic devices. Keeping Your Personal Information Secure Offline Lock your financial documents and records in a safe place at home, and lock your wallet or purse in a safe place at work. Keep your information secure from roommates or workers who come into your home.

Dealing with Cyberbullying: Tips for Kids and Parents to Prevent and Stop Cyberbullying Cyberbullying and Suicide If cyberbullying means you, or someone you know, feels suicidal, please call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) in the U.S., or visit IASP or Suicide.org to find a helpline in your country. What is cyberbullying? Cyberbullying occurs when a child or teen uses the Internet, emails, text messages, instant messaging, social media websites, online forums, chat rooms, or other digital technology to harass, threaten, or humiliate another child or teen.

10 Important Password Tips Everyone Should Know Your bank data, your accounts, your email, and your life are all wrapped up in your ability to create secure passwords and remember them. And yet most educators (and their students) struggle to remember passwords. With so many passwords stolen, there are things all of us SHOULD know to make our identities and bank accounts safer.

Related: