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Resources for Primary Source Documents

Resources for Primary Source Documents
Primary sources are resources that were first-hand created in a given period of time and never undergone any kind of editing or distortion. These sources are multimodal and they come in different forms. They can be artifacts, documents, pictures, recordings, essays, photographs, maps...etc. Now with the globalization of knowledge and the pervasive use of digital media, primary sources become accessible to everybody with an internet connection. However, the search for these materials is akin to a scavenger hunt and hence the importance of having a handy list such as the one below to keep for rainy days. I have been scouring the web for several hours and finally come up with this selection. Whether you teach social studies, history, literature, Geography or any other content area where there is a need for original and primary source documents, the list below will definitely be a good starting point for searching and assembling primary sources. 1- Library of Congress 4- Chronicling America

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/12/14-free-resources-for-primary-source.html

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Making Current Events Accessible to Kids Many parents and teachers grew up doing dull current-events reports based on static text found in newspapers. Today's students, who are immersed in a world in which news can be updated by anyone 24/7, need a different skill set to read and understand the world. Classroom current-events time provides the perfect opportunity to practice critical-thinking and text-analysis skills using timely and real-world sources.

Google Cultural Institute Loading Explore stories from around the world NASA astronaut from the International Space Station Museu do Amanhã Your daily digestFriday 16 December Rebuilding Ancient Egyptian Temples in 3D The reconstructions, in this section, give an idea of how these ancient temples might have appeared to ancient eyes. Ancient peoples liked to decorate their buildings and temples with bright colours. Take the Parthenon, in Athens, for example; nowadays we have this vision of those beautiful columns and fabulously carved marbles showing the bare stone, which appeals to our modern aesthetic. However, in ancient times the bare stone was hidden from view because it was all painted in the most brilliant colours.

CITE Journal: TPACK and Social Studies Hammond, T. C., & Manfra, M. M. (2009). Giving, prompting, making: Aligning technology and pedagogy within TPACK for social studies instruction. English grammar: A complete guide Do you have a question about the correct usage of the semi-colon or how to place relative adverbs in a sentence? If so, you've come to the right place! The edufind.com English grammar guide is a complete reference on the rules of English usage. Every grammatical rule is explained in clear, simple language with several examples and, when necessary, counter-examples. Early Byzantine Art Early Byzantine Art As you know, Rome was the capitol of the Roman Empire until the era of Constantine. In 324, Constantine moved the capital from Rome to the Greek City of Byzantium and renamed it Constantinople. Things were fine for awhile, but by the 5th century of the common era, things began to change.The West was under attack by the barbarians and ultimately fell apart. The cities that were part of the Roman empire declined in population or simply died. Many cities in France, Algeria, Syria, etc. simply disappeared.

EPRS GRAPHICS WAREHOUSE Disclaimer and Copyright statement In 'Publications' the summaries of information and other documents do not necessarily represent the views of the authors or the European Parliament. The products in 'Publications' are primarily addressed to the Members and staff of the European Parliament for their parliamentary work. Some links published in these products may be accessible only inside the European Parliament network. mshesso:Grammar AA = Avoid Anthropomorphism Do not assign uniquely human qualities to inanimate objects. For instance, results do not think and the literature does not believe. Inanimate objects or concepts can perform actions, such as supporting theories, demonstrating effects, and so forth, but they cannot engage in strictly human activities such as thinking and believing. See Section 3.09 (Precision and Clarity - Attribution), p. 69 of the APA Publication Manual for further details.

The Other Mystery of Easter Island Moai statues Easter Island is branded into popular consciousness as the home of the mysterious and towering moai statues, but these are not the only curiosity the South Pacific island holds. Where the moai are fascinating for their unknown purpose and mysterious craftsmen, the island's lost language of Rongorongo is equally perplexing. 3 Digital Tools for Helping Students Gain Perspective on Immigration By Erin Wilkey Oh, Common Sense Education As the debate over U.S. immigration policy continues to divide voters across the country, more and more online resources are popping up to help us understand this complex, emotionally charged issue. For young people without a personal connection to an immigration story, these websites, games, multimedia news pieces, and more, can help put a human face on an abstract debate. For students with first-hand knowledge of the immigrant experience, they can find validation of their stories and/or those of their friends and family. The three tools below give teachers a few ways to approach the topic of immigration in the classroom.

Building Vocabulary Page 1 of 2 What Is It? One of the most important responsibilities of every teacher is to help students develop a strong working vocabulary. Vocabulary falls into four categories: Listening: the words we understand when we hear them Speaking: the words we use when talking Reading: the words we understand when we read Writing: the words we use when writing To develop students' vocabulary, teachers must encourage a curiosity about the meaning and use of unfamiliar words and promote the use of strategies that will help students find the meaning of unfamiliar words. What's the Good Country? - The Good Country Problems like climate change, pandemics, migration, human trafficking, terrorism and economic chaos are multiplying because of globalisation. Technology like the internet and aeroplanes connect everyone and everything, so all the good stuff spreads, but so does the bad stuff: one person with a cold can cause a pandemic one geek with a laptop can shut down the power grid one bad bank can bring the global financial system to its knees.

How to learn the vocabulary of foreign languages Once you have got to grips with the fundamentals of a language (pronunciation, orthography and basic grammar), you can concentrate on learning vocabulary. This is probably the most important and time-consuming part of learning a language. Associate the familiar with the unfamiliar Try to find word or phrases in your L1 which sound like and if possible have a similar meaning to words in your L2. Build mental images or draw pictures based on the connections. For example, the Spanish for "ice" is hielo (m), which sounds like yellow. Empires That No Longer Exist Which protectorates are not listening to the US via the Snowden situation? Well, since when have the South American countries started thumbing their nose at their "friend" to the North? America started losing its grip there when they stopped installing their own regional administrators - twenty, even ten years ago, they'd have lined up to prevent Snowden from travelling there. Historically, Hong Kong would have handed him straight over, Ireland wouldn't have even considered asylum, nor would Germany and France have had so many ministers line up to say it was Europes job to protect him. I'd argue it's a hegemony, not an empire.

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