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Moral Heroes

Moral Heroes
In the mid 1990’s, a bright young youth made a global impact on Child Slavery. Iqbal Masih’s life was cut short just shy of 13 years but his powerful and eloquent speeches encouraged thousands of bonded laborers and child slaves to follow his example. He brought awareness and promoted education so that others could stand up for their rights and end the injustice in sweat shops around the world. In 1983, Iqbal Masih was born in the poor community of Maridke outside of Lahore, Pakistan. Iqbal became one of the many child bonded laborers at the carpet factory. “Children should have pens in their hands not tools” – Iqbal Masih When Iqbal was 10 years old he made up his mind to escape. At the age of 12, Iqbal found away to attend a freedom day celebration held by the Brick Layer Unions. The 12 year old Iqbal became a prominent leader of the anti-slave movement in Pakistan. The BLLF sent him to speak at businesses and demonstrations all over Pakistan where bonded slavery was known to exist.

A Bullet Can't Kill a Dream - Who Was Iqbal? Who Was Iqbal Masih? (click on pictures to see full size jpg) Iqbal Masih was four years old when his father sold him into slavery. He was forced to work more than twelve hours a day. He was constantly beaten, verbally abused, and chained to his loom by the carpet factory owner. On December 2, 1994, when Iqbal visited the Broad Meadows Middle School, he looked much younger than his twelve years: his growth had been stunted by severe malnutrition and years of cramped immobility in front of a loom. There are an estimated 20 million bonded laborers in Pakistan today; at least 7.5 million of these bonded laborers are children. In 1992 Iqbal's life changed dramatically. Iqbal was an articulate, confident, and powerful speaker and an uncompromising critic of child servitude.

Global Warming and the American Pika The tiny pika, a cousin of the rabbit that lives on mountain peaks in the western United States, is running out of options. In fact, they have already disappeared from over one-third of their previously known habitat in Oregon and Nevada. Now, the situation is so dire that the U.S. Because these small mammals have adapted to cold alpine conditions, pikas are intolerant of high temperatures and can die from overheating when exposed for just a few hours. Support National Wildlife Federation's work to protect pikas and other wildlife struggling to survive climate change, habitat loss and other threats >> Adapted to Cold Weather Pikas, which once lived across North America, have been retreating upslope over the past 12,000 years. Though most pikas in the Lower 48 inhabit alpine ecosystems exclusively, some survive at lower altitudes where deep, cool caves are available, such as the ice tubes in California's Lava Beds National Monument. Why is the Pika in Trouble? Nowhere to Go

Effects Global climate change has already had observable effects on the environment. Glaciers have shrunk, ice on rivers and lakes is breaking up earlier, plant and animal ranges have shifted and trees are flowering sooner. Effects that scientists had predicted in the past would result from global climate change are now occurring: loss of sea ice, accelerated sea level rise and longer, more intense heat waves. Taken as a whole, the range of published evidence indicates that the net damage costs of climate change are likely to be significant and to increase over time. Scientists have high confidence that global temperatures will continue to rise for decades to come, largely due to greenhouse gases produced by human activities. According to the IPCC, the extent of climate change effects on individual regions will vary over time and with the ability of different societal and environmental systems to mitigate or adapt to change. Future effects Change will continue through this century and beyond

ARKive - Discover the world's most endangered species Wildscreen's Arkive project was launched in 2003 and grew to become the world's biggest encyclopaedia of life on Earth. With the help of over 7,000 of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, Arkive.org featured multi-media fact-files for more than 16,000 endangered species. Freely accessible to everyone, over half a million people every month, from over 200 countries, used Arkive to learn and discover the wonders of the natural world. Since 2013 Wildscreen was unable to raise sufficient funds from trusts, foundations, corporates and individual donors to support the year-round costs of keeping Arkive online. As a small conservation charity, Wildscreen eventually reached the point where it could no longer financially sustain the ongoing costs of keeping Arkive free and online or invest in its much needed development. Therefore, a very hard decision was made to take the www.arkive.org website offline in February 2019.

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