background preloader

How Do Rubrics Help?

How Do Rubrics Help?
Rubrics are multidimensional sets of scoring guidelines that can be used to provide consistency in evaluating student work. They spell out scoring criteria so that multiple teachers, using the same rubric for a student's essay, for example, would arrive at the same score or grade. Rubrics are used from the initiation to the completion of a student project. They provide a measurement system for specific tasks and are tailored to each project, so as the projects become more complex, so do the rubrics. Rubrics are great for students: they let students know what is expected of them, and demystify grades by clearly stating, in age-appropriate vocabulary, the expectations for a project. They also help students see that learning is about gaining specific skills (both in academic subjects and in problem-solving and life skills), and they give students the opportunity to do self-assessment to reflect on the learning process. There are two common types of rubrics: team and project rubrics.

http://www.edutopia.org/assessment-guide-rubrics

Related:  Authentic LearningalexisblackmountainMethods of Teaching

Write a Great Authentic Task Project-based Learning engages students in projects that allow them to construct their own knowledge and develop authentic products while dealing with real-world issues. In order to challenge students on this level, it is helpful to frame their work with an authentic task. Authentic tasks require students to demonstrate proficiency by applying existing knowledge to solve a real-world problem.

Rubrics to the Rescue By Melissa D. Henning, M.Ed. Read this teacher-friendly article for an overview of the rationale for using rubrics and tools and tips for implementing rubrics as an assessment tool in your classroom. You will be able to create and start using rubrics for student assessment within an hour. What Are RubricsWhy Use Rubrics?Rubric Pro and ConImportant Characteristics of RubricsInvolving Students in Creating RubricsReady Made RubricsCreate Your Own Rubrics Using Online ToolsExamples of Classroom Projects That Use RubricsSources for Rubrics to the Rescue The Ten Commandments of Effective Classroom Management The Ten Commandments of Effective Classroom Management By William Shoap closeAuthor: William Shoap Name: William ShoapSite: See Authors Posts (1) William Shoap posted these commandments on the Classroom Management chatboard, and we thought them worthy of sharing here. One of the biggest barriers to teaching and learning in any school environment is the lack of effective classroom management methods.

Understanding Rubrics by Heidi Goodrich Andrade Understanding Rubrics by Heidi Goodrich Andrade Authentic assessments tend to use rubrics to describe student achievement. At last, here’s clarity on the term. Guidelines for Online Teaching Success May 18, 2011 By: Mary Bart in Distance Learning Administration Years ago at a faculty meeting Larry Ragan, PhD, director of Faculty Development for Penn State’s World Campus, was trying to soft-sell the idea of performance expectations for online faculty. He didn’t want the discussion to be misinterpreted as an indictment against their teaching style, but he also saw an opportunity to share proven practices for improving the online teaching and learning experience. Finally a senior faculty member grew tired of the tip-toeing around the subject and said, “If you don’t tell us what is expected, how will we know what to do to succeed?” The faculty member’s point was well taken, and over the years Ragan and others on various committees at Penn State have worked to define:

Ten Takeaway Tips for Using Authentic Assessment in Your School The School of the Future's (SOF) mission is to empower each and every student. Teachers accomplish this not only by making their classroom content and instruction engaging but also by making their assessments authentic. Teachers ask SOF students to demonstrate their comprehension and mastery of the curriculum in ways that are meaningful to them.

Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation brings pedagogical and technological issues together to support Carnegie Mellon faculty and graduate students in their roles as educators. New Resource: Teaching After Tragedy: What can instructors do to support students? Tragic events may take an emotional and cognitive toll on students, disrupt their lives, and interfere with learning for extended periods. Here we have strategies and resources to help instructors support students in the wake of tragedy... 30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers Editor’s Note: We often look at the qualities and characteristics of good teaching and learning, including the recent following pieces: How A Good Teacher Becomes Great What You Owe Your Students Ten Secrets To Surviving As A Teacher The Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment How To Be A Mediocre Teacher

Scoring Rubric: Business Letter/Memo Printable (6th - 12th Grade) Hanukkah Celebrate the Festival of Lights in your classroom! Hanukkah begins at sundown December 6. December Calendar of Events December is full of events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum. Our Educators' Calendar outlines activities for each event, including: World AIDS Day (12/1), International Volunteer Day (12/6), Hanukkah (begins at sundown 12/6), Handwashing Awareness Week (12/6-12), Computer Science Education Week (12/7-13), Human Rights Day (12/10), Winter Solstice (12/22), Christmas (12/25), Kwanzaa (begins 12/26), Visit the Zoo Day (12/27), and New Year's Eve (12/31). Plus, celebrate Bingo's Birthday Month, Universal Human Rights Month, and Write to a Friend Month all December long!

A Turn to Learn: September 2012 This idea is actually a gem that one of my students thought of a few years ago! One of my classes' favorite YouTube videos was this one... "If You're a Boy" from Harry Kindergarten. Well... my kids were chatty one day and I said "If you're a boy zip your lips." One of my girls said "If you're a boy, a boy, if you're a boy zip your lips!"

Mobile tech offers potential for formative assessment, authentic learning Mobile learning has potential for continuous assessment, ‘out-of-the-box’ instruction Policy makers and educators should not ignore the fact that mobile technology holds great potential for student engagement, continuous formative assessment, and authentic learning experiences, according to speakers during a Brookings Institution panel on mobile learning. During opening remarks, Peggy Johnson, executive vice president at Qualcomm Technologies and president of Global Market Development, noted that e-Rate reform should include an emphasis on mobile learning’s potential to transform brick-and-mortar school walls into virtual walls.

Related: