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Edutopia
According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming. In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code. They need this skill not because they’ll all go into it as a career—that isn’t realistic—but because it impacts every career in the 21st-century world. Teaching Coding to the Youngest Students Teaching Coding to Kids 8 and Up Related:  Computer Programming for all ages!Coding in School & Computer Science

Cyber Games and Programming | National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies (NICCS) In addition to traditional classroom work, learners can use a variety of online tools and games. Educators can utilize multiple education platforms, and students learn both within and outside the classroom. Cybersecurity Games: While completing formal coursework can be a great way to learn to program, playing online games can also allow users to learn programming skills. This is an interactive, fun way for students to learn the foundational skills necesaary for a career in cybersecurity. Click on any of the games below to start learning today. Programming Resources: From designing web pages to building mobile applications to developing databases, students learn to program in a variety of ways. Building Blocks, Robots, and Video Games: One day students are playing a game and the next they are developing it! Minecraft (link is external) - Minecraft is a game about building and placing blocks.Build Your Own Blocks (aka SNAP!) Open Courses Outside the Classroom:

Coding in the Classroom: A Long-Overdue Inclusion One need not look to superstars such as Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates to justify reasons for using code and programming logic in the classroom. There's plenty of literature that illustrates its positive learning outcomes. Coding in the classroom is linked to improved problem solving and analytical reasoning, and students who develop a mastery of coding have a "natural ability and drive to construct, hypothesize, explore, experiment, evaluate, and draw conclusions." But there are other compelling reasons for integrating code in the classroom. Reasons to Teach Coding 1. Wired Magazine reported that reading and writing code is the new literacy. 2. Coding in the classroom is a means of bridging the digital divide. 3. Temple Grandin, author and professor at Colorado State University and an autistic adult, said, "Without the gifts of autism, there would probably be no NASA or IT industry." Knowing there are programs for kids with ASD is good news for parents who shoulder the responsibility. 4.

Terrapin Home Page Give Your Kids a Most Excellent Summer Coding Adventure | EdSurge Guides For a new generation of students growing up in a digitally-connected century, all roads lead to code. Coding is the new literacy. It will not replace foreign languages, but it will be the global vernacular for understanding how technologies work. Unlike the Trix cereal, coding and computer science aren't just for kids. We all read to our children from a young age and encourage them to write. Not every coding job involves working in a blue chip tech company or Silicon Valley startup. And contrary to public perception, learning to code doesn't necessarily require hammering away at a keyboard, eyes affixed on some text editor. In this collection of articles below we share different perspectives on coding movement. It's summertime...and the coding’s easy.

Game Maven from Crunchzilla <h2>Game Maven from Crunchzilla is an interactive tutorial that lets anyone experiment with coding and write a few games.<p> Game Maven from Crunchzilla uses Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want to play with Game Maven. Otherwise, Game Maven will not be able to play with you. </p><p></h2> Hello, I'm Game Maven! Hello and Getting Started Lesson 1 BACK How to Play | Lesson Sections | About | FAQ | Terms of Use | Privacy | Contact | © 2015 How to Play Game Maven from Crunchzilla is the third and most advanced programming tutorial in the Crunchzilla series. It's easy to play. Click on the Reset button if you really mess up your code and want to start over on a lesson. Game Maven saves what lesson you are on, so feel free to stop at any time and come back later. If you haven't done Code Maven from Crunchzilla yet, you probably should do that first unless you already have a lot of programming experience. Have fun! Frequently Asked Questions What is the c in things like c.save()? Sure!

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. In my opinion, parents of every student in every school at every level should demand that all students be taught how to code. With the following resources, you can teach programming to every student and every age. Teaching Coding to the Youngest Students Tynker Games: Use these age-appropriate games to teach your elementary students coding concepts. Teaching Coding to Kids 8 and Up Hopscotch is a free iPad app for upper elementary and above.

Code Maven from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Maven gets teens excited about programming. It is an interactive tutorial where anyone can experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Maven from Crunchzilla uses Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want to play with Code Maven. Hi, I'm Code Maven! Getting Started Lesson 1 BACK How to Play | Lesson Sections | About | FAQ | Terms of Use | Privacy | Contact | © 2015 How to Play Code Maven teaches teens and adults a little about Javascript programming! It's easy to play. Click on the Reset button if you really mess up your code and want to start over on a lesson. Code Maven saves what lesson you are on, so feel free to stop at any time and come back later. Have fun! Frequently Asked Questions What is the c in things like c.save()? c is a variable Code Maven creates for you that contains the Canvas' 2D context. var c = document.getElementById('pane').getContext('2d'); How can I save my code and use it outside of Code Maven? Is there any other code that is hidden from me? Sure! About

28 Tools to Learn Computer Programming From edshelf. by edshelf: A discovery engine of websites, mobile apps, desktop programs, and electronic products for teaching and learning. Teaching primary and secondary students how to program has become a hot topic lately. Even people like United States President Barack Obama to actress Angela Bassett to music artist Shakira have spoken about the value of computer programming in an initiative called Hour of Code. With good reason too. Technology is a major part of our lives. Knowing how to build new technologies means having the ability to shape its direction. And to start, technology coordinator Holli Scharinger has curated a set of web, desktop, and mobile apps that students can use to learn computer programming. What tools do you use to learn how to program? 28 Tools to Learn Computer Programing From edshelf Image attribution flickr user timmccune

Front Page The First Lady of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and ITU Child Online Protection Champion, Dame Patience Goodluck Jonathan celebrates the winning team of the just concluded Technovation Challenge in Nigeria. She applauded the feat of these young girls who developed a mobile app to track traffic offenders in Nigeria. The team were also presented to the European parliament(www.witin.org/tc13) on 25th of April by the Secretary General of ITU, Dr Hamadoun I. Why teach coding in school? Whether you're a technophobe or a geeked-out early adopter, there's no denying that the world is run on computers, and the language of computers is code. It seems only natural that there's a wave of interest in the idea of teaching kids to code -- some say it should be a requirement in every school. I think no one would argue that every kid is cut out to be a programmer, but a basic understanding of code couldn't hurt. In fact, this knowledge could give a leg up in an increasingly technology-centric society. Hopefully this playlist of videos will help you learn more about some of the people and organizations who are working to change the opportunities available for kids to learn code. Video Playlist: Teaching Kids to Code Watch the player below to see the whole playlist, or view it on YouTube. What Most Schools Don't Teach (05:44) This video by Code.org went viral a year ago. More Resources on Teaching Coding Ready to jump in to play with some code in your own classroom? see more see less

Codecademy Releases Its First Educational App, A.K.A. My New Subway Time Killer Although I write a lot about apps and Internet stuff, I never really learned to code. I threw the “really” in there to soften the blow, but the fact is, I straight up don’t know how to do it. I started learning at one point in middle school, but my high school didn’t push CS, and by college I spent all of my waking hours writing for the student newspaper or reading books written by dead white guys. But it’s on my to-do list. Today Codecademy made its first foray into the app space and released an intro to coding course designed to take less than an hour to complete. The launch was timed to coincide with Computer Science Education Week, one of the goals of which is to get 10 million students in the U.S. to take an hour of coding. Codecademy for iPhone will eventually be its own independent learning platform, CEO and founder Zach Sims said. The app is meant to be a super-easy onboarding ramp to future coding. Some of the questions seem ridiculously easy. “Ha-ha!”

#SXSWedu: Code like a girl The 2015 SXSWedu Conference and Festival is in full swing in Austin, Texas. Team SmartBrief is there, bringing readers coverage of the discussions and happenings at this year’s show. When it comes to learning to code, girls approach it differently than boys, according to Douglas Kiang, computer science teacher at Punahou School in Honolulu, Hawaii. Douglas and his wife Mary, a computer science teacher at St. Andrews Priory, an all-girls school in Honolulu, talked to attendees about teaching girls to code in their Tuesday session, “Code like a girl! Girls want to work on projects that are meaningful, Douglas told attendees. Douglas and Mary shared three strategies to help educators better teach coding to girls: Redefine the traditional approach. Girls get excited about coding when it solves a problem or serves a purpose, said Mary. Did you miss some of our SXSWedu coverage? Related Posts No Related Posts Found

Hour of Code Offers Coding Tutorials from Bill Gates, Zuckerberg, Etc

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