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10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom

10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom
10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom by Mike Acedo Many of us can recall instances in our lives where we found ourselves idly sitting in a classroom, eyes glazed over, half listening to our teacher as they lectured in front of the room. These scenes are all too familiar in today’s schools, as the traditional model of learning has primarily revolved around a teacher-centered classroom, where instructors focus on conveying information, assigning work, and leaving it to the students to master the material. Though effective for some, this type of instruction has forced students to be merely receptors of information, rather than participants in their own learning processes through active learning. Fortunately, as technology has increasingly grown and infiltrated our classrooms, a new learning model has emerged that moves away from a teacher-centered space, and onto a more collaborative, student-centered learning environment, by way of a flipped classroom. The Pros 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Cons 1.

http://www.teachthought.com/trends/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/

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The App Generation: How Technology Is Changing Us A look at how digital and mobile technologies are impacting our young people. (owenstache/flickr) In 1950, with two younger colleagues, lawyer-turned-sociologist David Riesman published “The Lonely Crowd.” This portrait of changing American values had the rare distinction of being both a bestseller at the time and a classic of scholarly writing. One vision of tomorrow’s college: Cheap, and you get an education, not a degree (Illustration by Doug Chayka) Higher education — increasingly unaffordable and unattainable — is on the verge of a transformation that not only could remedy that, but could change the role college plays in our society. Can you imagine the benefits of colleges having little bricks-and-mortar overhead, of each student being taught in ways scientifically tailored to their individual needs, of educators, students and researchers being able to capi­tal­ize on global intelligence? In “The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere,” Kevin Carey, director of the Education Policy Program at the New America Foundation, a public-policy think tank in Washington, lays out a provocative history of how the university system got to this point and one vision of the revolution that’s beginning because of digital innovation.

My Beef With Badges Don't get me wrong. I love badges, digital badges for learning. And I don't mean just for some hoped-for potential to transform the learning landscape. I mean I love them for what I’ve seen them actually achieve: new literacies amongst youth to describe their learning within a Brooklyn after-school program; new motivation within an Atlanta private school; pride in portfolios within a Bronx library; a new understanding of how to use learning technology in a New Orleans day school; the emergence of formative assessment within a New York museum. I am informed by the theoretical but guided by practice, by what I have seen with my own eyes over the past five years. Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students The phrase “personalized learning” gets tossed around a lot in education circles. Sometimes it’s used in the context of educational technology tools that offer lessons keyed to the academic level of individual students. Other times it’s referring to the personal touch of a teacher getting to know a student, learning about their interests and tailoring lessons to meet both their needs and their passion areas. As with most education jargon, the phrase isn’t fixed, but it usually connects to the idea that not all students need the same thing at the same time.

Flipped-Learning Toolkit: Overcoming Common Hurdles Jon Bergmann: Here are some tips to overcome some of the hurdles and blunders that we’ve seen commonly happen as teachers flip their classrooms. Aaron Sams: Make sure your students can access the content. We all know that not all students have access to the Internet at their home, so you may have to come up with some other solutions. Get some flash drives, check them out to students; burn the video content onto DVDs; or write a grant, get a class set of some sort of digital device that you can check out to your students and they can take home and use that way. Jon Bergmann: Make sure you teach your students how to watch a video. You say, “My kids know how to watch a video.”

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Driving value into learning technology support programmes GAZELLE, the delivery partner for the Education and Training Foundation’s Learning Technology Support Scheme has launched its £1 million fund to stimulate learning technology workforce development in the education and training sector at www.lfutures.co.uk Christina Conroy OBE, Director at Coralesce was pleased to have been commissioned to undertake the baseline research report on how to drive value into learning technology support. A comprehensive review of the literature and precursor schemes over the last decade resulted in 12 recommendations about how to drive value into scheme design and implementation. Some of these recommendations are relevant for the current Education and Training Foundation Learning Technologies Support Programme 2014-15 run by Gazelle whilst others have resonance for future projects and schemes.

Education and Training Monitor calls for greater investment in education Member States must invest in education to avoid ‘educational poverty’, a Europe-wide report has found. The EU’s 2015 Education and Training Monitor said investment is needed to build more inclusive educational systems in Europe and combat unemployment. It called for Member States to focus efforts on improving the accessibility, quality and relevance of their education and training systems. The findings come as numerous Member States make cuts to their education budgets, which have fallen by 3.2% across Europe since 2010.

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