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123 Ideas for Character Flaws)

123 Ideas for Character Flaws)

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Related:  CharacterWriting In Generaldianemarycowan2dianemarycowan4Character Development

3 Steps to Writing a Novel with Unforgettable Characters Character development is one of the first essential steps of writing a novel and it involves creating the people who will carry out your story. There will most likely be a variety of characters needed for your story, but none as important as your lead character – your protagonist. A well-developed protagonist has much to do with the success of writing a novel. When writing a novel, the protagonist should be someone that your readers feel is a “real person” that they come to love (or at least like a whole lot), can relate to in many ways, and will care about and think about long after they’ve turned the final page on your novel. How to Create “Real People” for Your Novel

100 Not-Boring Writing Prompts for Middle- and High Schoolers 1. Attach an image (photo, magazine, etc.) to a notebook page and write about it. 2. What things will people in the future say about how we live now? A Simple Novel Outline – 9 questions for 25 chapters « H.E. Roulo Just as every tree is different but still recognizably a tree, every story is different but contains elements that make it a story. By defining those before you begin you clarify the scope of your work, identify your themes, and create the story you meant to write. At Norwescon 2011 I sat in on a session called Outline Your Novel in 90-minutes led by Mark Teppo. I’ll give you the brief, readable, synthesized version. Answer 9 questions and create 25 chapter titles and you’re there.

Name That Character: Top Ten Tips There are a plethora of movie character names that become everlasting brands in American culture: Rocky, Yoda, Forrest Gump, and Shrek to name a few. And when it comes to naming characters, you want to choose wisely, which is no easy task. Literature: Lennie Small: the mentally disabled but physically strong protagonist in John Steinbeck’s 1937 novella Of Mice and Men. Drama: Willy Loman: the elderly salesman lost in false hopes and illusions in Arthur Miller’s 1949 play Death of a Salesman. Film: “The Dude”: the unemployed L.A. slacker and avid bowler in Joel and Ethan Coen’s 1998 film The Big Lebowski. Steinbeck’s Lennie is a gentle giant who is “Small” of mind, with a simple dream of tending rabbits. Best fictional characters from Sherlock Holmes to Jane Eyre as chosen by 100 literary figures - Features - Books - The Independent Everyone who enjoys reading, and even those who do not, have a favourite literary character. From childhood staples such as William Brown and Paddington Bear to classic heroes and heroines like Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre and Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennet, these figures have resided in our imagination for years and in some cases centuries. One hundred people connected with literature, including writers, directors and publishers, were asked to nominate their favourite fictional creation. Some choices were more surprising than others - author Pauline McLynn chose evil killing machine Hannibel Lecter and said he could eat her kidneys "as long as he fed me an excellent bottle of red wine beforehand". Each to their own.

Creating Stunning Character Arcs, Pt. 7: The First Act The First Act is one of my favorite parts of any story. Why? On the surface, the First Act seems to be the slowest part of the story—and it often is. It’s just setup, after all, right? True enough, except for that one little word just. It isn’t “just” setup; it’s SETUP!

30 Incorrectly Used Words That Can Make You Look Bad While I like to think I know a little about business writing, I often fall into a few word traps. For example, "who" and "whom." I rarely use "whom" when I should. Thirteen Writing Prompts. [Originally published May 4, 2006.] Write a scene showing a man and a woman arguing over the man’s friendship with a former girlfriend. Do not mention the girlfriend, the man, the woman, or the argument. Write a short scene set at a lake, with trees and shit. Throw some birds in there, too. Building Character: What the Fiction Writers Say - Nieman Storyboard Think of the great characters from fiction. Gustave Flaubert’s romantic and unfocused Emma Bovary. Mark Twain’s spunky Huck Finn. Larry McMurtry’s lusty Gus McCrae. Margaret Mitchell’s willful Scarlett O’Hara.

the female bildungsroman — The Bildungsroman Project the frauenroman: a female perspective in coming-of-age stories The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Great Expectations, Catcher in the Rye, Invisible Man. These are novels familiar to most people.

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