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Introduction to User Stories

Introduction to User Stories
1. Introduction to User Stories A good way to think about a user story is that it is a reminder to have a conversation with your customer (in XP, project stakeholders are called customers), which is another way to say it's a reminder to do some just-in-time analysis. In short, user stories are very slim and high-level requirements artifacts. 2. Initial User Stories (Informal) As you can see in Figure 1 user stories are small, much smaller than other usage requirement artifacts such as use cases or usage scenarios. Figure 1. Important considerations for writing user stories: Stakeholders write user stories. Figure 2. 2. Figure 3. 4. There are two areas where user stories affect the planning process on agile projects: Scheduling. Figure 4. 5. As you can see in the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) life cycle of Figure 5, there are several distinct "phases" or seasons in the life cycle (some people will refer to the agile delivery life cycle as a release rhythm). Inception. Figure 5. 6. 7.

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Use Cases or User Stories? Murali Krishna tells us: Failure to effectively transition to Agile development is often based on a fundamental failure to understand what a User Story is. The most important aspect of a User Story is that it's an independently *schedulable* unit of requirement (feature). The key to achieving the "independently schedulable" characteristic of a user story is that you express it in terms of how a "user" would use it. This leads you to a unit of functionality that's implemented end-to-end (UI to backend) that a user can actually interact with. Agile Alliance Group News Retrospectives and feedback loops are at the heart of any successful Agile/Scrum implementation. They’re the tool we use to help teams improve. Yet in two day introduction to Agile classes they often get glossed over.

An Overview of the Scrum Process Scrum is a simple framework that does not demand any special tools or software. Here we explain how a project typically is run using Scrum. Product Backlog Before we can start to use Scrum on a project, there needs to be a Product Backlog. A project's Product Backlog is, in its most basic form, a list of everything that needs to be done in order for the project to finished. An example of an unsorted Product Backlog : Click here or on image to enlarge INVEST in Good Stories, and SMART Tasks (French) In XP, we think of requirements of coming in the form of user stories. It would be easy to mistake the story card for the “whole story,” but Ron Jeffries points out that stories in XP have three components: Cards (their physical medium), Conversation (the discussion surrounding them), and Confirmation (tests that verify them). A pidgin language is a simplified language, usually used for trade, that allows people who can’t communicate in their native language to nonetheless work together. User stories act like this.

Agile Techniques: Getting Started With Kanban As agile software development methodologies become more familiar within mainstream IT organizations, agile practitioners have been experimenting with some of Agile's Lean roots. One lean practice that has gained traction with many agilists is a Kanban board. Lean has much in common with agile. Lean has two principles, add value for your customer and empower your workers. If we look at the Agile Manifesto's 4 we can see similarities between the manifesto and Lean principles: [login] The Sprint Backlog - Example Sprint Task Board - International Scrum Institute Within the Sprint Backlog all activities required to complete the committed entries from the Scrum Product Backlog are stored. All entries have to be estimated on a person-hour base in order to track progress and remaining efforts. The Sprint Backlog is a living artifact and is updated on a daily base.

Where do User Stories Come From? Part 1. An Approach for Generating User Stories I see many agile Product Owners struggle with backlogs on their own for new projects. Quite often they insist on personally owning the backlog-which equates to authoring every story themselves. DFW Scrum (Irving, TX) Welcome to DFW Scrum! Our goal is to help you do better today than you were doing yesterday. The best way to do that is through the collective wisdom and experience of the crowd (sprinkled with some industry experts). Scrum is very simple to understand, but very hard to implement as it takes your problems and throws them in your face each and every day. We consider ourselves an organic group that is designed to tackle the challenges and issues you face regardless of your role in Scrum.

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