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10+ Good Web Tools to Create picture Quotes for Your Classroom

10+ Good Web Tools to Create picture Quotes for Your Classroom
How about creating some awesome graphic quotes to use in your classroom? These could be used either as warm-up activities or entry events to project based learning. Picture quotes could also serve as prompts to brainstorm ideas around a given topic or as educational posters to embellish your classroom walls with nuggets of wisdom. I have some searching and found this wonderful list from Louise Myers, check them out below.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/11/10-good-web-tools-to-create-picture.html

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Best Tools to Create Animated Video How to Make a Cartoon Yourself: Top 7 Animated Video Makers Compared Video production is not an easy and cheap matter. A short video for your YouTube channel or website may cost several thousand dollars if you address to professional video studios. No doubt, there are free and low-cost alternatives which can be easily mastered by any web user. A self-made cartoon or an animated video is one of the options. Animated Video Makers: Pros & Cons Her Code Got Humans on the Moon—And Invented Software Itself Margaret Hamilton wasn’t supposed to invent the modern concept of software and land men on the moon. It was 1960, not a time when women were encouraged to seek out high-powered technical work. Hamilton, a 24-year-old with an undergrad degree in mathematics, had gotten a job as a programmer at MIT, and the plan was for her to support her husband through his three-year stint at Harvard Law. After that, it would be her turn—she wanted a graduate degree in math. But the Apollo space program came along.

Smithsonian Digitizes & Lets You Download 40,000 Works of Asian and American Art Art lovers who visit my hometown of Washington, DC have an almost embarrassing wealth of opportunities to view art collections classical, Baroque, Renaissance, modern, postmodern, and otherwise through the Smithsonian’s network of museums. From the East and West Wings of the National Gallery, to the Hirshhorn, with its wondrous sculpture garden, to the American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery—I’ll admit, it can be a little overwhelming, and far too much to take in during a weekend jaunt, especially if you’ve got restless family in tow. (One can’t, after all, miss the Natural History or Air and Space Museums… or, you know… those monuments.)

The concept of different “learning styles” is one of the greatest neuroscience myths Most people visit brothels seeking pleasure. I went seeking the guidance of a self-described “feminist pimp” who promised to teach me something more valuable. I have a PhD in economics. I am an expert in assigning value to esoteric financial assets, exotic forms of labor, and pension finance. But like many women, I often don’t demand to be paid what I am worth. My career history contains far too many jobs where men, less qualified and experienced than I, were paid more than I was. Download 422 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art You could pay $118 on Amazon for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s catalog The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry. Or you could pay $0 to download it at MetPublications, the site offering “five decades of Met Museum publications on art history available to read, download, and/or search for free.” If that strikes you as an obvious choice, prepare to spend some serious time browsing MetPublications’ collection of free art books and catalogs. You may remember that we featured the site a few years ago, back when it offered 397 whole books free for the reading, including American Impressionism and Realism: The Painting of Modern Life, 1885–1915; Leonardo da Vinci: Anatomical Drawings from the Royal Library; and Wisdom Embodied: Chinese Buddhist and Daoist Sculpture in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Related Content:

Lessons From McGraw Hill: The Eurocentric Influence on History Textbooks and Classrooms Earlier this month, McGraw Hill found itself at the center of some rather embarrassing press after a photo showing a page from one of its high-school world-geography textbooks was disseminated on social media. The page features a seemingly innocuous polychromatic map of the United States, broken up into thousands of counties, as part of a lesson on the country’s immigration patterns: Different colors correspond with various ancestral groups, and the color assigned to each county indicates its largest ethnic representation. The page is scarce on words aside from an introductory summary and three text bubbles explaining specific trends—for example, that Mexico accounts for the largest share of U.S. immigrants today. The recent blunder has to do with one bubble in particular. Pointing to a patch of purple grids extending throughout the country’s Southeast corridor, the one-sentence caption reads:

The 100 Best, Most Interesting Blogs and Websites of 2014 Editor’s note: 2015’s list of the best, most interesting websites has arrived! The video above is a sampling from that list. Welcome to the most awesome blog post you’re going to see all year. Yep, it’s the third installment in the super-popular annual series in which I document the sites I think you’ll want to spend a lot of time on in the coming year (below you’ll find a few highlights from recent years in case you missed out).

Is there one great phrase to boost student effort and performance? - Assessment Literacy Have you read Daniel Coyle’s book, The Talent Code? It dives into patterns that are common across some of the world’s talent hotbeds. If you liked it, be sure to check out his blog – The Simple Phrase that Increases Effort 40%; it really resonated with my passion for formative assessment strategies.

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