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Policy: Twenty tips for interpreting scientific claims

Policy: Twenty tips for interpreting scientific claims
Science and policy have collided on contentious issues such as bee declines, nuclear power and the role of badgers in bovine tuberculosis. Calls for the closer integration of science in political decision-making have been commonplace for decades. However, there are serious problems in the application of science to policy — from energy to health and environment to education. One suggestion to improve matters is to encourage more scientists to get involved in politics. Although laudable, it is unrealistic to expect substantially increased political involvement from scientists. Another proposal is to expand the role of chief scientific advisers1, increasing their number, availability and participation in political processes. Perhaps we could teach science to politicians? In this context, we suggest that the immediate priority is to improve policy-makers' understanding of the imperfect nature of science. Of course, others will have slightly different lists. No measurement is exact.

http://www.nature.com/news/policy-twenty-tips-for-interpreting-scientific-claims-1.14183

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