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English Has a New Preposition, Because Internet

English Has a New Preposition, Because Internet
Let's start with the dull stuff, because pragmatism. The word "because," in standard English usage, is a subordinating conjunction, which means that it connects two parts of a sentence in which one (the subordinate) explains the other. In that capacity, "because" has two distinct forms. It can be followed either by a finite clause (I'm reading this because [I saw it on the web]) or by a prepositional phrase (I'm reading this because [of the web]). These two forms are, traditionally, the only ones to which "because" lends itself. I mention all that ... because language. You probably know it better, however, as explanation by way of Internet—explanation that maximizes efficiency and irony in equal measure. Indeed. Well here is a nice young man, Fred E. And like this, from the Daily Kos: If due north was good enough for that chicken's parents and grandparents and great-great-great-great-grandparents, it's good enough for that chicken too, damn it. And like this, from Lindy West and Jezebel:

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/11/english-has-a-new-preposition-because-internet/281601/

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