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Cosmos, Moby’s Song ‘We Are All Made of Stars’, Universe & Solar System

Cosmos, Moby’s Song ‘We Are All Made of Stars’, Universe & Solar System
The theory that everyone and everything on Earth contains minuscule star particles dates back further than Moby's popular 2002 song "We Are All Made of Stars." In the early 1980s, astronomer Carl Sagan hosted and narrated a 13-part television series called "Cosmos" that aired on PBS. On the show, Sagan thoroughly explained many science-related topics, including Earth's history, evolution, the origin of life and the solar system. "We are a way for the universe to know itself. His statement sums up the fact that the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen atoms in our bodies, as well as atoms of all other heavy elements, were created in previous generations of stars over 4.5 billion years ago. "All organic matter containing carbon was produced originally in stars," Impey told Life's Little Mysteries. How star stuff got to Earth When it has exhausted its supply of hydrogen, it can die in a violent explostion, called a nova. "It's a well-tested theory," Impey said. Cosmic connections Got a question? Related:  New Earth Spacecosmos

Space Zen: Will Humans' Brains Change During Travel in Outer Space? -A Galaxy Insight In February, 1971, Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell experienced the little understood phenomenon sometimes called the “Overview Effect”. He describes being completely engulfed by a profound sense of universal connectedness. Without warning, he says, a feeing of bliss, timelessness, and connectedness began to overwhelm him. He describes becoming instantly and profoundly aware that each of his constituent atoms were connected to the fragile planet he saw in the window and to every other atom in the Universe. Rusty Schweikart experienced it on March 6th 1969 during a spacewalk outside his Apollo 9 vehicle: “When you go around the Earth in an hour and a half, you begin to recognize that your identity is with that whole thing. Their experiences, along with dozens of other similar experiences described by other astronauts, intrigue scientists who study the brain. Newberg's first test subject will not be an astronaut, but rather a civilian. This is done with Faraday cages.

Einstein for Everyone Einstein for Everyone Nullarbor Press 2007revisions 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 Copyright 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 John D. Norton Published by Nullarbor Press, 500 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 with offices in Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15222 All Rights Reserved John D. An advanced sequel is planned in this series:Einstein for Almost Everyone 2 4 6 8 9 7 5 3 1 ePrinted in the United States of America no trees were harmed web*bookTM This book is a continuing work in progress. January 1, 2015. Preface For over a decade I have taught an introductory, undergraduate class, "Einstein for Everyone," at the University of Pittsburgh to anyone interested enough to walk through door. With each new offering of the course, I had the chance to find out what content worked and which of my ever so clever pedagogical inventions were failures. At the same time, my lecture notes have evolved. This text owes a lot to many. i i i

How Old is the Milky Way ? eso0425 — Science Release VLT Observations of Beryllium in Two Old Stars Clock the Beginnings 17 August 2004 Observations by an international team of astronomers [1] with the UVES spectrometer on ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) have thrown new light on the earliest epoch of the Milky Way galaxy. The age of the Milky Way How old is the Milky Way? Globular clusters and the ages of stars Modern astrophysics is capable of measuring the ages of certain stars, that is the time elapsed since they were formed by condensation in huge interstellar clouds of gas and dust. Stars belonging to a globular cluster were born together, from the same cloud and at the same time. Still, those cluster stars were not the first stars to be formed in the Milky Way. Despite intensive searches, it has until now not been possible to find less massive stars of this first generation that might still be shining today. Beryllium to the rescue Galactic cosmic rays and the Beryllium clock Notes

Science & Environment - Drake equation: How many alien civilizations exist? Are we alone? It is a question that has occupied mankind for centuries. Today, we live in an age of exploration, where robots on Mars and planet-hunting telescopes are beginning to allow us to edge closer to an answer. While we wait to establish contact, one technique we can use back on Earth is an equation that American astronomer Frank Drake formulated in the 1960s to calculate the number of detectable extraterrestrial civilizations may exist in the Milky Way galaxy. It is not a rigorous equation, offering a wide range of possible answers. Until ground-based observations, space telescopes and planet-roving robots uncover any tell-tale signs of life, what better way to speculate on how many intelligent alien civilizations may exist than to explore the universe with our interactive version of the equation.

Here's How You Can Help Scientists Study Sex, Whales, and Distant Galaxies "There is so much we don't know!" said Dick Vane-Wright, the Keeper of Entomology at the London Museum of Natural History when author Sharman Apt Russell was asking about butterflies. "You could spend a week studying some obscure insect and you would then know more than anyone else on the planet. Russell is an evangelist for citizen science—that is, research conducted by amateur aficionados of data collection. Ultimately, though, what Russell learned went far beyond the intricate details of tiger beetles' lives. So for anyone who wants to dip their toes into science, but then leave the heavy lifting to the professionals, citizen science might be the answer. 1) Classify galaxy shapes using Galaxy Zoo: There are about 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe, and we know very little about the vast majority of them. Screenshot: Foldit 4) Help scientists learn about human sexual activity via Kinsey Reporter: Want a project that's a bit more titillating?

Nibiru's Orbit, The Red Star of Bethlehem, Sonic Levitation, Ancient Wisdom by David Millo www.world-mysteries.com Articles by David Millo All Articles Copyright 2002 by David Millo, MysteriesUnsealed.com Copyright 2002 World-Mysteries.com The Red Star of Bethlehem by David Millo "We have seen his star appear in the first rays of dawn... and lo, the star which they had seen in the east, went on before them, until it came and stood over where the child was." This bible narrative from Matthew recounts the actions of ancient astronomers - Wise Men. With the first rays of dawn on February 1, 4 BC that star appeared. Mars had an Arean association to the Babylonians. Auspiciously, Mars' retrograde motion made it appear to stand still for some 5 days centered on the spring equinox. Antares becomes visible in the southeastern sky about mid-spring to observers in the northern hemisphere. The apostle Paul expounded on the 'UNKNOWN GOD'S" altar to the Athenians on Mars Hill (Acts 17:22-31). This 2003 opposition will be 56 million km. away. Mars is the god of war. Sonic Levitation Made Easy

Gini coefficient Gini coefficient of national income distribution around the world. This is based on 1989 to 2009 data, estimated by the CIA. Some are pre-tax and transfer, others post-tax income. The Gini coefficient (also known as the Gini index or Gini ratio) (/dʒini/) is a measure of statistical dispersion intended to represent the income distribution of a nation's residents. It was developed by the Italian statistician and sociologist Corrado Gini and published in his 1912 paper "Variability and Mutability" (Italian: Variabilità e mutabilità).[1][2] The Gini coefficient measures the inequality among values of a frequency distribution (for example levels of income). There are some issues in interpreting a Gini coefficient. Definition[edit] Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The graph shows that the Gini coefficient is equal to the area marked A divided by the sum of the areas marked A and B. that is, Gini = A / (A + B). Calculation[edit] This may be simplified to: where and , then , so that

Messier object Plot of declination vs right ascension of the Messier objects relative to the modern constellations, ecliptic and Milky Way The Messier objects are a set of over 100 astronomical objects first listed by French astronomer Charles Messier in 1771.[1] Messier was a comet hunter, and was frustrated by objects which resembled but were not comets, so he compiled a list of them,[2] in collaboration with his assistant Pierre Méchain, to avoid wasting time on them. The number of objects in the catalog reached 103 during his lifetime but a few more thought to have been observed by Messier have been added by other astronomers over the years. A similar list had been published in 1654 by Giovanni Hodierna, but had no impact and was probably not known to Messier.[3] Lists and editions[edit] The first edition covered 45 objects numbered M1 to M45. Messier lived and did his astronomical work at the Hôtel de Cluny (now the Musée national du Moyen Âge), in France. Observations[edit] See also[edit]

Sacred Geometry: Flower of Life Sacred Geometry - Flower of Life By Andrew Monkman I believe the complete ancient flower of life is an inter-dimensional tool, a portal, a stargate, a window into what some call the inter space plains. The original flower of life (found on several pillars within "the Osireion" at abydos in Egypt) is incomplete, because it is only the first layer of three (pic1+2). 1. The Temple of Osiris at Abydos, Egypt. 2. The complete flower has the other two layers added, making it three dimensional (pic3). 3. What appears is a reptilian entity. Flower of Life - Beijing, China The second being is the Chinese dragon ( the fu dog). You may know that the complete flower contains the kabbalah`s tree of life, the fruit, the egg and the seed of life (pic. 4 & 5). 4. 5. The complete flower also contains the three dimensional metatron cube (pic6), which holds all the Platonic solids (pic7). 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. I was born and bred and now live back in Kirkwall. 12. 13. 14. 15. Update - June 2011 Dance of the Planets

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