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How To Waste Time Properly - Issue 7: Waste

How To Waste Time Properly - Issue 7: Waste
Ever since Frederick Winslow Taylor timed the exact number of seconds that Bethlehem Steel workers took to push shovels into a load of iron ore and then draw them out, maximizing time efficiency has been a holy grail of the American workplace. But psychologists and neuroscientists are showing us the limits of this attitude: Wasting time, they say, can make you more creative. Even seemingly meaningless activities such as watching cat videos on YouTube may help you solve math problems. Brent Coker, who studies online behavior at the University of Melbourne in Australia, found that people who engage in “workplace Internet leisure browsing” are about 9 percent more productive than those who don’t. Last year, Jonathan Schooler, a psychology professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara published with his doctoral student Benjamin Baird a study called Inspired by Distraction. Schooler isn’t alone in his conclusion. So what kinds of distractions, exactly, are best?

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Related:  ProductivityMonotaskingSelf Actualisation

4 Things You Thought Were True About Time Management - Amy Gallo by Amy Gallo | 1:00 PM July 22, 2014 I don’t know anyone who doesn’t struggle with how to make the most of their time at work. How do you stay on top of an overflowing inbox? The Super Simple Phone Hack That Will Transform Your Productivity A while back, my cofounder Leo gave me an interesting suggestion: He said I should try disabling all notifications on my iPhone. I find this suggestion especially interesting because it is one that goes against the normal phone setup. It’s so usual to stick to how things are, and with iPhone apps the easiest thing to do is to “allow” all those notifications. It seems almost odd to even consider doing things any other way. I chose to go along with Leo’s suggestion, although I was admittedly quite skeptical that it would change much.

To scan or not to scan, that is the question… Starting on the road to a paperless lifestyle can be a little overwhelming. Of course, there are some tools that can help to make it easier. There are things you can do to better organize your digital documents. Once your documents are been scanned in, there are ways of securing and protecting your documents. And having a simple process for going paperless can be a big help. But suppose you have all of these things. The Exact Amount Of Time You Should Work Every Day Editor's Note: This is one of the most-read leadership articles of 2014. Click here to see the full list. You know that taking frequent breaks is good for your productivity, focus, and creativity, but you just never seem to get around to it.

Monotasking Is The New Multitasking We all know multitasking is inefficient. A classic 2007 study of Microsoft workers found that when they responded to email or instant messaging alerts, it took them, on average, nearly 10 minutes to deal with their inboxes or messages, and another 10-15 minutes to really get back into their original tasks. That means that a mere three distractions per hour can preclude you from getting anything else done. Then there’s the relationship “inefficiency” that comes from multitasking. You can spend hours rebuilding the good will torched by a single glance at your phone during an inopportune time. We know this, yet we keep doing it.

This Will Challenge Your Beliefs In A Way You Never Expected Bias and prejudice are formed in our mind unconsciously. When we act, we don’t even realize there may be bias behind it. We simply take in different opinions and make them become our beliefs that we don’t ever challenge. Take a moment and think about the thoughts you have, what makes you think this way and what effect you have to the world by thinking this way? 4 Reasons Why Being Comfortable Isn’t a Good Thing We should all be comfortable, shouldn’t we? Well the answer may be obvious to most; yes of course everyone should have the right to a comfortable life. However comfort most often goes hand in hand with stagnation, in whatever your goals may be.

Multi-taskers are Bad At It People who multitask all the time may be the worst at doing two things at once, new research suggests. The findings, based on performances and self-evaluations by about 275 undergraduate students, suggest many people multitask not out of a desire to boost productivity, but because they are easily distracted and can't focus on one activity. And those people turn out to be the worst at juggling different things, the researchers said. "From a public safety perspective, it's a little alarming that the people who report using a cellphone while driving the most are the persons who are the worst at multitasking," said study co-author David Sanbonmatsu, a psychologist at the University of Utah. The findings were published today (Jan. 23) in the journal PLoS One.

How to Criticize with Kindness: Philosopher Daniel Dennett on the Four Steps to Arguing Intelligently By Maria Popova “In disputes upon moral or scientific points,” Arthur Martine counseled in his magnificent 1866 guide to the art of conversation, “let your aim be to come at truth, not to conquer your opponent. So you never shall be at a loss in losing the argument, and gaining a new discovery.” Of course, this isn’t what happens most of the time when we argue, both online and off, but especially when we deploy the artillery of our righteousness from behind the comfortable shield of the keyboard.

The Brain-Based Secret to Personal Productivity By now, you've probably already broken most of your New Year's resolutions. You're not alone: Only about 8 percent of those who make them keep them. But it may not be that you'll never lose weight or learn a foreign language. If you aren't being productive or if you feel off track, it could simply be because you haven't set yourself up for success in a way that suits your individuality. Take a typical New Year's resolution like running. The overall goal is to lose weight.

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