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National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
General statistics: At least 30 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder in the U.S. Every 62 minutes at least one person dies as a direct result from an eating disorder.Eating disorders have the highest morality rate of any mental illness.13% of women over 50 engage in eating disorder behaviors.In a large national study of college students, 3.5% sexual minority women and 2.1% of sexual minority men reported having an eating disorder.16% of transgender college students reported having an eating disorder.In a study following active duty military personnel over time, 5.5% of women and 4% of men had an eating disorder at the beginning of the study, and within just a few years of continued service, 3.3% more women and 2.6% more men developed an eating disorder.Eating disorders affect all races and ethnic groups.Genetics, environmental factors, and personality traits all combine to create risk for an eating disorder. Anorexia Nervosa: Bulimia Nervosa: “Diabulimia:” Related:  Expository PieceBeauty projectmjmbx

Get The Facts On Eating Disorders | National Eating Disorders Association What Are Eating Disorders? Eating disorders are real, complex, and devastating conditions that can have serious consequences for health, productivity, and relationships. They are not a fad, phase or lifestyle choice. Eating disorders are serious, potentially life-threatening conditions that affect a person’s emotional and physical health. People struggling with an eating disorder need to seek professional help. In the United States, 20 million women and 10 million men suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time in their life, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or EDNOS (Wade, Keski-Rahkonen, & Hudson, 2011). For various reasons, many cases are likely not to be reported. Health Consequences, Including Mortality In anorexia nervosa’s cycle of self-starvation, the body is denied the essential nutrients it needs to function normally. Abnormally slow heart rate and low blood pressure, which mean that the heart muscle is changing.

Statistics on Eating Disorders: Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Eating disorders studies, statistics and research are surprisingly difficult to find. Occasionally you will find websites and articles that reference a few key studies, but they are few and far between outside of university or clinical journals and papers. We’ve put together some of the key statistics on eating disorders here for our readers. Anorexia Nervosa Statistics Anorexia Prevalence It is estimated that 1.0% to 4.2% of women have suffered from anorexia in their lifetime.[1] Anorexia Mortality Rates Anorexia has the highest fatality rate of any mental illness.[2]It is estimated that 4% of anorexic individuals die from complications of the disease[3] Access to Anorexia Treatment Only one third of individuals struggling with anorexia nervosa in the United States obtain treatment.[4] Bulimia Nervosa Statistics Bulimia Prevalence It is estimated that up to 4% of females in the United States will have bulimia during their lifetime[5]. Bulimia Mortality Rates Access to Bulimia Treatment References

General Statistics Eating disorders are serious, life-threatening illnesses that impact millions of people every year in the United States. Get the Facts on Eating Disorders In spite of the unprecedented growth of eating disorders in the past two decades, eating disorders research continues to be under-funded, insurance coverage for treatment is inadequate, and societal pressures to be thin remain rampant. Mortality and Eating Disorders This study systematically searched for articles pertaining to eating disorders mortality between the years of 1966 and 2010. Prevalence and Correlates of Eating Disorders in Adolescents A new study estimates that approximately a half million teens struggle with eating disorders or disordered eating.

Instagram: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (Part 1) | National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) Take a picture. Choose a digital filter. Write a caption. Upload. Now just wait for the "likes" and comments to roll in. These are the basic steps involved in successfully uploading a picture onto Instagram, a social networking service that allows iPhone and android users to take pictures and videos and share them with friends and other users on a variety of other social networking services such as Facebook, and Twitter. A recent trend in the Instagram world is the use of pictures and profiles as “thinspiration”. Instagram has taken some action in response the pro-eating disorder content that has been developing. So have these social media bans and restrictions been effective? For more information on this topic, see the following articles:

Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA Most of us have something we don't like about our appearance — a crooked nose, an uneven smile, or eyes that are too large or too small. And though we may fret about our imperfections, they don’t interfere with our daily lives. But people who have body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) think about their real or perceived flaws for hours each day. They can't control their negative thoughts and don't believe people who tell them that they look fine. Their thoughts may cause severe emotional distress and interfere with their daily functioning. They may even undergo unnecessary plastic surgeries to correct perceived imperfections, never finding satisfaction with the results. Characteristics of BDD BDD is a body-image disorder characterized by persistent and intrusive preoccupations with an imagined or slight defect in one's appearance. People with BDD can dislike any part of their body, although they often find fault with their hair, skin, nose, chest, or stomach. Symptoms Diagnosis and Treatment

Statistics | National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) Understanding Statistics on Eating Disorders It is important to make sure that you understand the meaning of any eating disorder statistic you may read, and how it can be used. Look at the research from which the statistics come: What kind of questions did the researchers ask? The statistics NEDIC uses are gathered from peer-reviewed articles in highly regarded journals. Statistics are also useful in initiating discussion on eating disorders, and in encouraging people to help work toward the healing, health and well-being of everyone affected by an eating problem. Please note: The following statistics have been compiled from specific research studies and papers as cited. Prevalence of Eating Disorders According to a 2002 survey, 1.5% of Canadian women aged 15–24 years had an eating disorder.Government of Canada. (2006). The prevalence of anorexia and bulimia is estimated to be 0.3% and 1.0% among adolescent and young women respectively. Eating Disorders in Males Children and Adolescents

Statistics on Eating Disorders: Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating — Eating Disorder Hope Eating disorders studies, statistics and research are surprisingly difficult to find. Occasionally you will find websites and articles that reference a few key studies, but they are few and far between outside of university or clinical journals and papers. We’ve put together some of the key statistics on eating disorders here for our readers. Anorexia Nervosa Statistics Anorexia Prevalence It is estimated that 1.0% to 4.2% of women have suffered from anorexia in their lifetime.[1] Anorexia Mortality Rates Anorexia has the highest fatality rate of any mental illness.[2]It is estimated that 4% of anorexic individuals die from complications of the disease[3] Access to Anorexia Treatment Only one third of individuals struggling with anorexia nervosa in the United States obtain treatment.[4] Bulimia Nervosa Statistics Bulimia Prevalence It is estimated that up to 4% of females in the United States will have bulimia during their lifetime[5]. Bulimia Mortality Rates Access to Bulimia Treatment References

Ever Do Something Just So You Can Post About It On Social Media? You're Not Alone | Bustle In largely unsurprising but all the same distressing findings from a new study, a third of Americans have done something — anything — just to post it on their social media. So that Swarm check-in at that gallery you didn’t even want to attend? Or that Instagram pic you snapped with that creepy actor whose movies you haven’t seen? We’re on to your social mobility cache, pal. Hand over the iPhone and consider wasting your time with something you actually enjoy. These stats come to you from a survey commissioned by ICON50, a program launched by the Ford Motor Company that explores the plausible evolution of pop culture as it “encourages Americans to rekindle their sense of adventure behind the wheel of the all-new Mustang.” But here’s the best part: we’re all on to each other’s b.s. Images: Giphy (2)

Symptoms and causes - Body dysmorphic disorder Symptoms Signs and symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder include: Being extremely preoccupied with a perceived flaw in appearance that to others can't be seen or appears minor Strong belief that you have a defect in your appearance that makes you ugly or deformed Belief that others take special notice of your appearance in a negative way or mock you Engaging in behaviors aimed at fixing or hiding the perceived flaw that are difficult to resist or control, such as frequently checking the mirror, grooming or skin picking Attempting to hide perceived flaws with styling, makeup or clothes Constantly comparing your appearance with others Always seeking reassurance about your appearance from others Having perfectionist tendencies Seeking frequent cosmetic procedures with little satisfaction Avoiding social situations Being so preoccupied with appearance that it causes major distress or problems in your social life, work, school or other areas of functioning When to see a doctor Causes Risk factors

NIMH » Eating Disorders Among Children While many people are concerned about what they eat and their body image, eating disorders are marked by extremes. They are present when a person experiences severe disturbances in their eating behavior, such as extreme reduction of food intake or extreme overeating, or feelings of extreme distress or concern about body weight or shape. The following chart shows eating disorder information from the National Comorbidity Survey – Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A) Link to non-government website. For more information, click on Policies in our footer. , and defines an eating disorder broadly as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and/or binge eating disorder. Additional information about eating disorders can be found on NIMH’s eating disorders page. View/Download PDF The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) examines the prevalence of eating disorders among children who are slightly younger than those in the NCS-A. View/Download PDF

Meconnaissance: Who are we? | Critical Theory Lacan writes, “It is this moment that decisively tips the whole of human knowledge into mediatization through the desire of the other, constitutes its objects in an abstract equivalence by the co-operation of others, and turns the I into that apparatus for which every instinctual thrust constitutes a danger, even though it should correspond to a natural maturation…” (1289). The word meconnaissance is a French word meaning misrecognition, which Lacan uses to describe the illusion of the mirror stage. In other words, the infant sees his or her reflection as real, but the image is truly only an “imaginary mode”, as Gallop calls it. The Lacan quote above is fascinating because it describes not only how the mirror is a mediator of our concept of the “ ideal I”, but also talks about how others mediate our identity. These social norms, ideas, and perceptions of others become dangerous because our true self is then mediated through other people and society.

Bulimia Nervosa | Facts, Symptoms, Signs, Causes, Medical Impact | Medical Impact, Treatment, Help Bulimia is a condition where sufferers typically binge and purge. Bingeing is consuming large quantities of food in a short time, during which individuals feel they have no control over their eating. Purging is the release of that food by self-induced vomiting, laxative abuse or compulsive exercising. Purging is not necessarily used to lose weight. It may be used to demonstrate control or for punishment. Although the number of males who develop eating disorders is increasing, bulimia most frequently afflicts adolescent girls and young women. Medical Impact of Bulimia Frequent bingeing and purging of food can have severe medical consequences. Frequent vomiting can cause other health problems, such as swollen glands, and inflammation or tearing of the esophagus, which can be deadly. Bulimia may also cause an electrolyte imbalance, chronic constipation, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, swelling and acid reflux. Signs of Bulimia Causes of Bulimia Helping Someone With Bulimia

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