background preloader

8 Tips to Power-Up Your Classroom Presentations

8 Tips to Power-Up Your Classroom Presentations
Last month, I attended a Back to School Night for parents, sitting through presentation after presentation by teachers, some with slides that helped make their presentation a delight to listen to, and others . . . well, that's why I'm writing this blog post. The goal of a classroom presentation is to aid you in effectively conveying information in a way that allows students (or their parents) to remember what you said. Unfortunately, for some, the presentation becomes a crutch, and they begin to rely on the slides to tell their story, rather than to help them tell the story. I've been creating presentations using software like PowerPoint and KeyNote for 20 years, and I've learned a lot about how to most effectively communicate. Here's what I've found. 1. It's a common myth that better presentations use fewer slides. The number of slides in your presentation is irrelevant. In the movie Amadeus, the Emperor of Austria complains to Mozart that his music has "too many notes." Figure 1. 2. 3.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/8-tips-classroom-presentation-jason-cranford-teague

Related:  PresentPresentation tipsSchool ideas

3 Simple Tools to Create Quote Posters for Your Class May 29, 2015 Below are three of our favourite web tools for creating picture quotes. You can use these tools with your students to create beautiful quote posters for your class. These picture quotes can be used as warm-up activities or entry events to project based learning. They could also serve as prompts to brainstorm ideas around a given topic or as educational posters to embellish your classroom walls with nuggets of wisdom. 1- PixTeller

Creativity on the Run: 18 Apps that Support the Creative Process "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." - Albert Einstein We do not need to teach creativity, but rather inspire its daily practice. Somewhere along the way, we simply forgot to honor this innate gift and how to access its power. Six Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning Project-Based Learning (PBL) naturally lends itself to differentiated instruction. By design, it is student-centered, student-driven and gives space for teachers to meet the needs of students in a variety of ways. PBL can allow for effective differentiation in assessment as well as daily management and instruction. PBL experts will tell you this, but I often hear teachers ask for real examples, specifics to help them contextualize what it "looks like" in the classroom. In fact, the inspiration for this blog came specifically from requests on Twitter! We all need to try out specific ideas and strategies to get our brains working in a different context.

Adobe Slate- A Great App for Creating Beautiful Visual Stories with Students August 8, 2015 Adobe Slate is an excellent free iPad app for students to use in digital storytelling.The app allows you to animate and bring to life any type of document and turn it into a beautiful visual story. Adobe Slate offers a wide range of interesting features that make it easy for students to design appealing stories without the need for any design knowledge. Some of the things Adobe Slate offers include: professionally designed lay-outs, beautiful magazine-like themes, multiple fonts and colours, call-to-action buttons and many more.

Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation I was recently in a third grade classroom and was struck by the presence of rules that were posted for how to have a conversation. The poster said, "Each person must contribute to the discussion but take turns talking. Ask each other, 'Would you like to add to my idea?' Universal Design for Learning (UDL) | Special Education Universal Design for Learning is a framework that provides educators with a structure to develop their instruction to meet the wide range of diversity among all learners. UDL is a research-based framework that suggests that a one-size-fits-all approach to curricula is not effective. UDL was inspired by universal design in architecture, where design features intended for individuals with disabilities have had unexpected benefits for the general population (e.g. curb cut outs designed for wheelchair access have benefits for strollers, rolling luggage, skateboarders, etc.)

How to use presentation templates from SlidesCarnival How can I use a template? Open the presentation in Google Drive using the link you’ll find in the detail page. Edit the presentation in Google Slides Go to the File menu and select Make a copy. You will get a copy of the document on your Google Drive and will be able to edit, add or delete slides. The Most Important Thing to Know to Prevent Technology Problems During a Lecture Have you ever been excitedly launching into a technology empowered lecture you spent hours developing only to run head first into something that didn’t work … leaving you floundering, lost in a sea of broken “teaching with technology” dreams? You had no reason expect that your DVD wouldn’t play, or your video could hardly be heard. Why doesn’t this computer open your file? Why can’t you get to the Internet site you have to share?

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? Saying to students, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday.” Yikes—no safety net, no parachute, no scaffolding—they’re just left blowing in the wind. Let’s start by agreeing that scaffolding a lesson and differentiating instruction are two different things. Scaffolding is breaking up the learning into chunks and then providing a tool, or structure, with each chunk. When scaffolding reading, for example, you might preview the text and discuss key vocabulary, or chunk the text and then read and discuss as you go.

What Is Your Learning Style? What Is Your Learning Style? This quiz asks 24 questions and will take less than five minutes to complete. Try not to think too hard -- just go with your first thought when describing your daily activities and interests. By the end, you may have some new insights into your learning preferences.

Related: