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Introduction to Cajun, Louisiana Creole & zydeco music

Introduction to Cajun, Louisiana Creole & zydeco music
By Jim Hobbs Cajun, Louisiana Creole & Zydeco Music Search home Who are the Cajuns? What is Cajun music and where did it come from? The French colonized Canada beginning in 1604, with many settling in what is now Nova Scotia but was then called Acadie. The word Cajun comes from the word Acadian. Few Acadians stayed in the port of arrival, New Orleans. The music these people brought was simple. Alan Lomax described the music of Poitou, the region in France most Acadians came from, as: solo unaccompanied ballads, lyric songs with complex texts, unaccompanied air playing on fiddles and wind instruments, unison group performances of ceremonial songs, and dance orchestras where string and wind duos play tunes in unison or in an accompanying relationship. The earliest Acadian songs were long ballads originally from France. Cajun music is first and foremost, social music. Musicians wrote original songs telling of their life in the new world. Cajun music was first recorded in New Orleans in 1928.

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Cajun Folk Songs by Frank Ticheli Composer's Notes Cajuns are descendants of the Acadians, a group of early French colonists who began settling in Acadia (now Nova Scotia) around 1604. In 1755 they were driven out by the British, eventually resettling in South Louisiana. Today there are nearly a million French-speaking descendants of the Acadians living in Louisiana and parts of Texas, preserving many of the customs, traditions, stories, and songs of their ancestors. Although a rich Cajun folksong tradition exists, the music has become increasingly commercialized and Americanized throughout the twentieth century, obscuring its original simplicity and directness. In response to this trend, Alan and John Lomax traveled to South Louisiana in 1934 to collect and record numerous Cajun folksongs in the field for the Archive of Folk Music in the Library of Congress. By doing so, they helped to preserve Cajun music in its original form as a pure and powerful expression of Louisiana French Society.

Difference Between Cajun Music and Zydeco? By Megan Romer Question: What is the difference between Cajun Music and Zydeco? Answer: Many people, when hearing Louisiana-style music with accordion, simply think "Zydeco!" However, Cajun Music and Zydeco are actually quite different. Cajun History Primer: Cajuns Cajuns (/ˈkeɪdʒən/; French: les Cadiens or Les Cadiens or les Acadiens, [le kadjɛ̃, lez‿akadjɛ̃]) are an ethnic group mainly living in the U.S. state of Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles (French-speakers from Acadia in what are now The Maritimes of Eastern Canada). Today, the Cajuns make up a significant portion of south Louisiana's population and have exerted an enormous impact on the state's culture.[2] Acadia[edit]

Reading/Research Room The following summary of the history of Cajun, Creole, and Zydeco music is based entirely on information included in the sources listed at the bottom of the page. Anyone who wants to gain an understanding of the development of French music in Southwest Louisiana needs to start with these sources. The best way to experience the history of Cajun, Creole, and Zydeco music first hand is to listen to the many historical recordings now available. Both Cajun music and the Creole music that evolved into Zydeco are the products of a combination of influences found only in Southwest Louisiana. History of Cajun Country CAJUN ('ka:-j@n), n. A person of French Canadian descent born or living along the bayous, marshes, and prairies of southern Louisiana. The word Cajun began in 19th century Acadie (now Nova Scotia, Canada) when the Acadians began to arrive. The French of noble ancestry would say, "les Acadiens", while some referred to the Acadians as "le 'Cadiens", dropping the "A". Later came the Americans who could not pronounce "Acadien" or "'Cadien", so the word "Cajun" was born.

Jacksonian Democracy - Facts & Summary Such tendentious revisionism may provide a useful corrective to older enthusiastic assessments, but it fails to capture a larger historical tragedy: Jacksonian Democracy was an authentic democratic movement, dedicated to powerful, at times radical, egalitarian ideals—but mainly for white men. Socially and intellectually, the Jacksonian movement represented not the insurgency of a specific class or region but a diverse, sometimes testy national coalition. Its origins stretch back to the democratic stirrings of the American Revolution, the Antifederalists of the 1780s and 1790s, and the Jeffersonian Democratic Republicans. More directly, it arose out of the profound social and economic changes of the early nineteenth century. Recent historians have analyzed these changes in terms of a market revolution. Not everyone benefited equally from the market revolution, least of all those nonwhites for whom it was an unmitigated disaster.

Jacksonian Democracy and Modern America Andrew Jackson rose to national prominance as a General during the War of 1812. The presidential election of 1828 brought a great victory for Andrew Jackson. Not only did he get almost 70 percent of the votes cast in the electoral college, popular participation in the election soared to an unheard of 60 percent. This more than doubled the turnout in 1824; Jackson clearly headed a sweeping political movement. Seneca Falls in 1848 - Women's Rights National Historical Park In the 1790s, the first white settlers founded Seneca Falls alongside the falls of the Seneca River, a mile-long series of rapids with a combined drop of 49 feet. Participants in the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign (1779) had recognized the potential of the area and returned. The Continental Army’s Campaign is considered by some an astounding military feat, by others a tragic devastation of the homelands of the Iroquois Confederacy or Six Nations.

Monroe Doctrine, 1823 - 1801–1829 - Milestones - Office of the Historian Monroe Doctrine, 1823 In his December 2, 1823, address to Congress, President James Monroe articulated United States’ policy on the new political order developing in the rest of the Americas and the role of Europe in the Western Hemisphere. President James Monroe The statement, known as the Monroe Doctrine, was little noted by the Great Powers of Europe, but eventually became a longstanding tenet of U.S. foreign policy. Monroe and his Secretary of State John Quincy Adams drew upon a foundation of American diplomatic ideals such as disentanglement from European affairs and defense of neutral rights as expressed in Washington’s Farewell Address and Madison’s stated rationale for waging the War of 1812. The three main concepts of the doctrine—separate spheres of influence for the Americas and Europe, non-colonization, and non-intervention—were designed to signify a clear break between the New World and the autocratic realm of Europe.

Industrial Revolution - Facts & Summary The textile industry, in particular, was transformed by industrialization. Before mechanization and factories, textiles were made mainly in people’s homes (giving rise to the term cottage industry), with merchants often providing the raw materials and basic equipment, and then picking up the finished product. Workers set their own schedules under this system, which proved difficult for merchants to regulate and resulted in numerous inefficiencies. In the 1700s, a series of innovations led to ever-increasing productivity, while requiring less human energy.

Building the Erie Canal Teachers, please read the following before creating accounts for your students: PBS LearningMedia permits teachers to create accounts for their students so that they can access educational content. When creating accounts for your students, please provide the following information for each student: Canal History - New York State Canals The New York State Canal System is not only rich in history, but also culture. Many immigrants worked long and hard on "Clinton’s Ditch" to create this magnificent waterway. Folklore, songs and speech lingo emerged from those individuals working along the Canal. As the population grew and the Canal prospered, it became not only a transportation waterway, but also a vacation area for the well-to-do. At one time, more than 50,000 people depended on the Erie Canal for their livelihood.

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