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Henry Markram builds a brain in a supercomputer

Henry Markram builds a brain in a supercomputer

http://www.ted.com/talks/henry_markram_supercomputing_the_brain_s_secrets.html

Related:  Artificial IntelligenceNeurosciences - brain structure

Applications of artificial intelligence Artificial intelligence has been used in a wide range of fields including medical diagnosis, stock trading, robot control, law, remote sensing, scientific discovery and toys. However, many AI applications are not perceived as AI: "A lot of cutting edge AI has filtered into general applications, often without being called AI because once something becomes useful enough and common enough it's not labeled AI anymore," Nick Bostrom reports.[1] "Many thousands of AI applications are deeply embedded in the infrastructure of every industry." In the late 90s and early 21st century, AI technology became widely used as elements of larger systems, but the field is rarely credited for these successes.

New tasks become as simple as waving a hand with brain-computer interfaces Small electrodes placed on or inside the brain allow patients to interact with computers or control robotic limbs simply by thinking about how to execute those actions. This technology could improve communication and daily life for a person who is paralyzed or has lost the ability to speak from a stroke or neurodegenerative disease. Now, University of Washington researchers have demonstrated that when humans use this technology – called a brain-computer interface – the brain behaves much like it does when completing simple motor skills such as kicking a ball, typing or waving a hand. Learning to control a robotic arm or a prosthetic limb could become second nature for people who are paralyzed.

Neuron All neurons are electrically excitable, maintaining voltage gradients across their membranes by means of metabolically driven ion pumps, which combine with ion channels embedded in the membrane to generate intracellular-versus-extracellular concentration differences of ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Changes in the cross-membrane voltage can alter the function of voltage-dependent ion channels. If the voltage changes by a large enough amount, an all-or-none electrochemical pulse called an action potential is generated, which travels rapidly along the cell's axon, and activates synaptic connections with other cells when it arrives. Neurons do not undergo cell division. In most cases, neurons are generated by special types of stem cells.

Ray Kurzweil’s How to Create a Mind to be published Nov. 13 Ray Kurzweil’s next book — How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed* — will be published Nov. 13, Viking announced today. It can now be pre-ordered. In the book, Kurzweil explores the most important science project since the human genome: reverse-engineering the brain to understand precisely how it works, then applying that knowledge to create vastly intelligent machines. Drawing on the most recent neuroscience research, compelling thought experiments, and his own research and inventions in artificial intelligence, he describes his new theory of how the neocortex (the thinking part of the brain) works: as a self-organizing hierarchical system of pattern recognizers. A roadmap to superintelligence

Lab-Grown Model Brains Cross-section of cerebral organoid; All cells in blue, neural stem cells in red, and neurons in green. MADELINE A. LANCASTERIn an Austrian laboratory, a team of scientists has grown three-dimensional models of embryonic human brains. These “cerebral organoids” are made from stem cells, which are simply bathed in the right cocktail of nutrients and grown in a spinning chamber. Functional magnetic resonance imaging Researcher checking fMRI images Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) is a functional neuroimaging procedure using MRI technology that measures brain activity by detecting associated changes in blood flow.[1] This technique relies on the fact that cerebral blood flow and neuronal activation are coupled. When an area of the brain is in use, blood flow to that region also increases.

Rethinking artificial intelligence The field of artificial-intelligence research (AI), founded more than 50 years ago, seems to many researchers to have spent much of that time wandering in the wilderness, swapping hugely ambitious goals for a relatively modest set of actual accomplishments. Now, some of the pioneers of the field, joined by later generations of thinkers, are gearing up for a massive “do-over” of the whole idea. This time, they are determined to get it right — and, with the advantages of hindsight, experience, the rapid growth of new technologies and insights from the new field of computational neuroscience, they think they have a good shot at it. The new project, launched with an initial $5 million grant and a five-year timetable, is called the Mind Machine Project, or MMP , a loosely bound collaboration of about two dozen professors, researchers, students and postdocs.

Hierarchical Temporal Memory We've completed a functional (and much better) version of our .NET-based Hierarchical Temporal Memory (HTM) engines (great job Rob). We're also still working on an HTM based robotic behavioral framework (and our 1st quarter goal -- yikes - we're late). Also, we are NOT using Numenta's recently released run-time and/or code... since we're professional .NET consultants/developers, we decided to author our own implementation from initial prototypes authored over the summer of 2006 during an infamous sabbatical -- please don't ask about the "Hammer" stories.

Neuron - Anatomical Plasticity of Adult Brain Is Titrated by Nogo Receptor 1 To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or purchase a subscription. Click here to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Neuron, Volume 77, Issue 5 , 859-866, 6 March 2013 Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 10.1016/j.neuron.2012.12.027 Authors Hint: Rollover Authors and Affiliations Diffusion MRI Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method which came into existence in the mid-1980s.[1][2][3] It allows the mapping of the diffusion process of molecules, mainly water, in biological tissues, in vivo and non-invasively. Molecular diffusion in tissues is not free, but reflects interactions with many obstacles, such as macromolecules, fibers, membranes, etc. Water molecule diffusion patterns can therefore reveal microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state.

Thanks for the context! I find this a very fascinating field. You seem quite knowledgeable on the subject: any other sites you would recommend to follow this up? by cassius Nov 21

Henry Markram simulates a brain's neurons and the neurons' connections (ie. a 'connectome' cf. "Sebastian Seung: i am my connectome") on a supercomputer. A striking difference with AI artificial neural networks is a each neuron and its bochemistry is simulated on a processor, whereas AI uses an (over) simplified model of a few bytes as a neuron and simple caltulations (adding, multiplying) as signal exchange. Markram's technology driven approach differs from Ramachandran's low-tech (mirrors in a box) clinical approach in "Ramachandran: on your mind". by kaspervandenberg Nov 7

Related:  Blue Brain Project