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Cajun Music: The Savoy Family Band

Cajun Music: The Savoy Family Band

Cajun Musical Instruments Cajun Cajun Music History A great specialty of the folk music of North America is that, like the nation itself, it is derived from several different cultures. When the Europeans migrated to the newly found American continent, they took with them the music of their lands. The music that we hear in North American nations as of today, is an evolved form of the music derived from several European folk traditions. The origin of Cajun music can be traced back to the Acadian colonists, who had settled down in the province of Acadia. This region stretched towards the east of Quebec, and included the Maritime provinces, parts of New England and Maine, and stretched till Philadelphia. The location of the colonies and a tinge of French colonial music has brilliantly shaped the Cajun music that we hear today. What is Cajun Music Cajun music cannot be simply defined as the music of Louisiana. History of Cajun Music In 1764, several French colonists and Acadians migrated to South Louisiana form Nova Scotia (Canada).

Cajun music Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada. Cajun music is often mentioned in tandem with the Creole-based, Creole-influenced zydeco form, both of Acadiana origin. These French Louisiana sounds have influenced American popular music for many decades, especially country music, and have influenced pop culture through mass media, such as television commercials. Aural analysis[edit] Cajun music is relatively harsh with an infectious beat and a lot of forward drive, placing the accordion at the center. Besides the voices, only two melodic instruments are heard, the accordion and fiddle, but usually in the background can also be heard the high, clear tones of a metal triangle. Subgenres of Cajun music[edit] Traditional Cajun (Before 1930)[edit] Country and Texas swing Cajun (1934ā€“1941)[edit] This style involves heavy elements of Texas country music influence and a move away from the traditional accordion. Lyrics[edit] Academic

Cajun music Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada. Cajun music is often mentioned in tandem with the Creole-based, Cajun-influenced zydeco form, both of Acadiana origin. These French Louisiana sounds have influenced American popular music for many decades, especially country music, and have influenced pop culture through mass media, such as television commercials. Aural analysis[edit] Cajun music is relatively harsh with an infectious beat and a lot of forward drive, placing the accordion at the center. Besides the voices, only two melodic instruments are heard, the accordion and fiddle, but usually in the background can also be heard the high, clear tones of a metal triangle. Subgenres of Cajun music[edit] Traditional Cajun[edit] Country and Texas swing Cajun[edit] Main article: Western swing This style involves heavy elements of Texas country music influence and a move away from the traditional accordion. Dancehall Cajun[edit]

Rap Music Cajun Music Pioneer - Joseph Falcon The special atmosphere of a real "fais do-do," a Cajun country dance, is captured here on this live recording by Cajun music innovator, Joe Falcon. He made the very first Cajun recording back in 1928, of "Allons a Lafayette," a version of which can be heard here. Falcon was one of the very first instrumentalists to bring together accordion and the more traditional fiddle on rural Louisiana folk songs. Though the album's less-than-perfect recording conditions occasionally blur some of the lyrics, to have a document of a "fais do-do" from 1963 is a rare treat. Falcon, who died in 1965, had a plaintive, inimitable singing voice, as this album makes clear.

Salsa music Conga drums, one of the foundational instruments of salsa music. Salsa as a musical term[edit] "In 1973, I hosted the television show Salsa which was the first reference to this particular music as salsa. But promotion certainly wasn't the only factor in the music's success, as Sanabria makes clear: "Musicians were busy creating the music but played no role in promoting the name salsa Globally, the term salsa has eclipsed the original names of the various Cuban musical genres it encompasses. Issues of identity and ownership[edit] There is considerable controversy surrounding the term salsa and the idea that it is its own distinct genre. The salsa conflict can be summarized as a disagreement between those who do not recognize salsa as anything other than Cuban music with another name,[14][25] and those who strongly identify with salsa as a music and culture distinct from its Cuban primogenitor.[25] The Cuban origins of the music do not conveniently fit into the pan-Latino narrative. Notes

Country music Early origins[edit] Ryman Auditorium, the "Mother Church of Country Music" Immigrants to the Southern Appalachian Mountains of North America brought the music and instruments of the Old World along with them for nearly 300 years. They brought some of their most important valuables with them, and to most of them this was an instrument: "Early Irish settlers enjoyed the fiddle because it could be played to sound sad and mournful or bright and bouncy According to historian Bill Malone in Country Music U.S.A, country music was "introduced to the world as a southern phenomenon "Country music is the combination of African and European folk songs coming together and doing a little waltz right here in the American south. Country music is often erroneously thought of as solely the creation of European Americans. First generation (1920s)[edit] Second generation (1930sā€“1940s)[edit] One effect of the Great Depression was to reduce the number of records that could be sold. Changing instrumentation[edit]

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