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The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry #4

The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry #4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RRVV4Diomg

Related:  Year 10 ScienceChemistry

Particles and waves: The central mystery of quantum mechanics - Chad Orzel While the story in the video starts around 1900, the question of whether light is a particle or a wave is much older, dating back to the 1600’s. Isaac Newton put forth a particle model of light as a stream of “corpuscles,” while the Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens preferred a model of light as a wave. The question was thought to have been settled in 1800 by Thomas Young, who provided a definitive demonstration of wave behavior when light encounters a pair of small slits, an experiment.You can see this dramatized in this Veritasium video. You can also simulate the behavior of waves using a large number of Java applets collected here. Give it a try!

Rocketology: Baking Soda + Vinegar = Lift Off! Please ensure you have JavaScript enabled in your browser. If you leave JavaScript disabled, you will only access a portion of the content we are providing. <a href="/science-fair-projects/javascript_help.php">Here's how.</a> The 2,400-year search for the atom - Theresa Doud Ernest Rutherford Although Ernest Rutherford is well known for his discovery of the nucleus, he did a lot of other research and experiments into topics other than the atom. He started his career studying electricity and magnetism and it wasn’t until he left his home of New Zealand and moved to Cambridge, England that he started working with the atom.

Rusting Out: How Acids Affect the Rate of Corrosion Please ensure you have JavaScript enabled in your browser. If you leave JavaScript disabled, you will only access a portion of the content we are providing. <a href="/science-fair-projects/javascript_help.php">Here's how.</a> Abstract Thingdom - Educators Thingdom challenges students to select and breed 'Things' to bring out particular characteristics through inheritance. Play the game Using an engaging game format designed especially to appeal to teenagers, Thingdom provides an innovative way of illustrating some of the fundamental principles of genetics such as the inheritance of characteristics through generations, and dominant and recessive genes. It provides a fun and engaging way for students to practice solving simple genetic problems such as predicting the outcomes from monohybrid crosses.

From Dull to Dazzling: Using Pennies to Test How pH Affects Copper Corrosion Please ensure you have JavaScript enabled in your browser. If you leave JavaScript disabled, you will only access a portion of the content we are providing. <a href="/science-fair-projects/javascript_help.php">Here's how.</a> Abstract Pennies are bright and shiny when they're new, but become quite dull with time.

GENIE One in a Million? This activity is a fun, interactive session where students look at a small number of their own physical traits, for example, whether they are male or female, whether they can roll their tongue or not and several others. Tutor explaining One in a Million to group of students Students put this “scientific data” into an excel spreadsheet (supplied in the supporting documentation) and this then calculates how rare/special they are within a given population.

Make Your Own pH Paper Abstract This is a simple "kitchen chemistry" project about acid/base chemistry. Scientists measure the acidity or alkalinity of a solution using a logarithmic scale called the pH scale. In this project you'll learn about the pH scale, and you'll make your own pH indicator paper using a pH-sensitive dye that you'll extract from red cabbage. UNSW Science Year 10 Work Experience 2017 - UNSW Science for society UNSW Science will be running the Year 10 work Experience Program from 27 November to 1 December 2017. We are currently accepting applications from students in Year 10 who are enrolled in an Australian secondary school. All successful applicants will be notified on Friday 28 July, 2017.

Cabbage Chemistry Please ensure you have JavaScript enabled in your browser. If you leave JavaScript disabled, you will only access a portion of the content we are providing. <a href="/science-fair-projects/javascript_help.php">Here's how. The twisting tale of DNA - Judith Hauck Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid containing the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms (with the exception of RNA viruses). which contains the biological instructions that make each species unique, along with the instructions it contains, is passed from adult organisms to their offspring during reproduction. National Human Genome Research Institute began as the National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR), which was established in 1989 to carry out the role of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the International Human Genome Project (HGP). The HGP was developed in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy and begun in 1990 to map the human genome. information in DNA is stored as a code made up of four chemical bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Human DNA consists of about 3 billion bases, and more than 99 percent of those bases are the same in all people.

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