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Miwa Matreyek: Glorious visions in animation and performance

Miwa Matreyek: Glorious visions in animation and performance

http://www.ted.com/talks/miwa_matreyek_s_glorious_visions.html

Related:  video production

Miwa Matreyek turns to science for inspiration for new performance In the opening of Miwa Matreyek’s TED performance, a pair of shadowy hands wave over a plate, and an apple halves itself. From there, goldfish swirl around the plate, before morphing into birds and flying away. For the first minute, you think you are watching video — an intricate blend of real-life footage and animation. Miwa Matreyek: Glorious visions in animation and performanceBut soon you realize that what you are watching is more complex than that.

Will Potter: The secret US prisons you've never heard of before Father Daniel Berrigan once said that "writing about prisonersis a little like writing about the dead."I think what he meant is that we treat prisoners as ghosts.They're unseen and unheard.It's easy to simply ignore themand it's even easier when the government goes to great lengths to keep them hidden. As a journalist, I think these storiesof what people in power do when no one is watching,are precisely the stories that we need to tell.That's why I began investigatingthe most secretive and experimental prison units in the United States,for so-called "second-tier" terrorists.The government calls these units Communications Management Units or CMUs.Prisoners and guards call them "Little Guantanamo."They are islands unto themselves.But unlike Gitmo they exist right here, at home,floating within larger federal prisons.

Why bees are disappearing: Marla Spivak at TEDGlobal 2013 Photo: James Duncan Davidson Our supermarket produce aisles would look very, very bare without bees. As MacArthur Fellow Marla Spivak explains on the TEDGlobal stage, this is something we should all be extremely concerned about: the dramatic drop in bee populations that’s been taking place over the past seven years. Teacher’s Guide Series Home : Education & Outreach : Teacher’s Guide Series The Academy, in cooperation with Young Minds Inspired, produces a series of teacher's guides that explore the art and science of motion pictures. The activities are designed to capitalize on students' natural interest in current films and the excitement generated by the Academy Awards to teach valuable lessons in critical thinking and creative writing, and to develop visual literacy skills. Each teaching guide is available in its entirety to download and print. The guides are made available to more than 19,500 U.S. high schools throughout the United States, reaching 39,600 teachers and nearly 2.4 million students. Teacher's Guides

TED aligns with Monsanto, halting any talks about GMOs, 'food as medicine' or natural healing (NaturalNews) Allow me to be the first to announce that TED is dead. Why? Because the group that organizes so-called "TED talks" has been thoroughly hijacked by corporate junk science and now openly rejects any talks about GMOs, food as medicine, or even the subject of how food can help prevent behavioral disorders in children. All these areas of discussion are now red-flagged from being presented on any TED stage. This is openly admitted by TEDx itself in a little-known letter publicly published on December 7, 2012.

Teaching Visual Media Literacy Media literacy educator Frank Baker reminds us that the annual season for movie awards has begun, with the 85th annual Academy Awards scheduled for February 24. In a new two-part article for MiddleWeb, Baker shares key ideas about ways teachers in grades 4-8 can develop students’ visual media literacy skills by (1) involving them in video production like the PSA project described here, and (2) by teaching them to “read” multimedia forms, from magazine layouts to major motion pictures — all of which ties into a pair of Common Core ELA standards. by Frank W. Baker Do your students love to pick up a camera? Take pictures with their mobile devices?

TED talks are lying to you The writer had a problem. Books he read and people he knew had been warning him that the nation and maybe mankind itself had wandered into a sort of creativity doldrums. Economic growth was slackening. The Internet revolution was less awesome than we had anticipated, and the forward march of innovation, once a cultural constant, had slowed to a crawl. One of the few fields in which we generated lots of novelties — financial engineering — had come back to bite us. And in other departments, we actually seemed to be going backward. 13 GIFs That Show You How Everyday Items Are Made 13 GIFs That Show You How Everyday Items Are Made Some we use everyday, others we only ever see the final product - but how exactly are things like forks, crash barriers, springs and even camouflage helmets actually made? How come your pretzel is perfect every time?

Have TED Talks Turned Ideas into an Industry? AMERICAN CHRONICLES about the TED ideas conference. TED—a four-day conference of research lectures, technology demonstrations, arts performances, and self-described world-changing ideas—has become in recent years a showroom for the intellectual style of the digital age. It is today home to the fastest-growing, best-educated, and wealthiest creative communities in America. (Admission to the Long Beach conference starts at seventy-five hundred dollars, not including the hotel; tickets are sold solely by invitation, or through an application that includes both essays and references.)

Creating a Classroom Studio with an iPad and a Green Screen One way to depict the cycle of education is that it moves between the development of learning and the subsequent expression of understanding ... and the amazing growth of inexpensive mobile technology tools is affording learners the ability to communicate their understanding in ever more creative and personalized manners. Media is moving center stage (yes, the pun was fully intended) and what once required tens of thousands of dollars in equipment and training can now be accomplished with an iPad and some inexpensive props. One of the first places I visited when I first came to the United States was Universal Studios.

Don't mention income inequality please, we're entrepreneurs - Media Criticism There was a bit of a scandal last week when it was reported that a TED Talk on income equality had been censored. That turned out to be not quite the entire story. Nick Hanauer, a venture capitalist with a book out on income inequality, was invited to speak at a TED function. The Grammar of TV and Film Zoom. In zooming in the camera does not move; the lens is focussed down from a long-shot to a close-up whilst the picture is still being shown. The subject is magnified, and attention is concentrated on details previously invisible as the shot tightens (contrast tracking). It may be used to surprise the viewer. Zooming out reveals more of the scene (perhaps where a character is, or to whom he or she is speaking) as the shot widens. Zooming in rapidly brings not only the subject but also the background hurtling towards the viewer, which can be disconcerting.

The trouble with TED talks I’ve long been amused by the slogan of TED, makers of the ubiquitous TED talks. TED’s slogan is this: ‘Ideas worth spreading.’ Apparently TED has some ideas, and we should spread them. What ideas?

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