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ScienceBlogs Brasil – Blogs de Ciência

ScienceBlogs Brasil – Blogs de Ciência

http://scienceblogs.com.br/

Related:  Mental

Which is the best mindmapping software? I track discussions about mind mapping on Twitter and in blogs, and I often hear or read the question "Which is the best mindmapping software?" Anyone who gives you a single, immediate answer either knows you and your mindmapping activities very well, or is likely recommending the one that they've become familiar with themselves. What's "best"? What is "best" depends so much on how you use mind maps. Some people use them for study, some for planning projects, some for organizing information, some to spark ideas and facilitate brainstorming sessions, some while planning the writing of a report or blog post.

The Socratic Method The Socratic Method:Teaching by Asking Instead of by Tellingby Rick Garlikov The following is a transcript of a teaching experiment, using the Socratic method, with a regular third grade class in a suburban elementary school. I present my perspective and views on the session, and on the Socratic method as a teaching tool, following the transcript. The Online Books Page Listing over 2 million free books on the Web - Updated Wednesday, February 8, 2017 Search our Listings -- New Listings -- Authors -- Titles -- Subjects -- Serials More open access journals now listed here -- Blog (Everybody's Libraries) -- Latest Book Listings

Nudibranchs—Photo Gallery—National Geographic Magazine Skip to this page's content National Geographic Society P.O. Box 98199 Washington, DC 20090-8199 USA Sign In Join Search National Geographic Bad Astronomy Well now, this is an interesting discovery: astronomers have found what looks like a "super-Earth" – a planet more massive than Earth but still smaller than a gas giant – orbiting a nearby star at the right distance to have liquid water on it! Given that, it might – might – be Earthlike. This is pretty cool news.

Collatz conjecture The Collatz conjecture is a conjecture in mathematics named after Lothar Collatz, who first proposed it in 1937. The conjecture is also known as the 3n + 1 conjecture, the Ulam conjecture (after Stanisław Ulam), Kakutani's problem (after Shizuo Kakutani), the Thwaites conjecture (after Sir Bryan Thwaites), Hasse's algorithm (after Helmut Hasse), or the Syracuse problem;[1][2] the sequence of numbers involved is referred to as the hailstone sequence or hailstone numbers (because the values are usually subject to multiple descents and ascents like hailstones in a cloud),[3][4] or as wondrous numbers.[5] Take any natural number n. If n is even, divide it by 2 to get n / 2. If n is odd, multiply it by 3 and add 1 to obtain 3n + 1. Repeat the process (which has been called "Half Or Triple Plus One", or HOTPO[6]) indefinitely.

Thinking Machine 4 Thinking Machine 4 explores the invisible, elusive nature of thought. Play chess against a transparent intelligence, its evolving thought process visible on the board before you. The artwork is an artificial intelligence program, ready to play chess with the viewer. If the viewer confronts the program, the computer's thought process is sketched on screen as it plays. A map is created from the traces of literally thousands of possible futures as the program tries to decide its best move. Study Hacks The Opposite of the Open Office October 19th, 2016 · 12 comments The Bionic Office A couple weeks ago, I wrote about Joel Spolsky’s claim that Facebook’s massive open office is scaring away talent. The comments on the post added many interesting follow ups; e.g., a pointer to a recent podcast episode where a Facebook developer claims the office is rarely more than a third full as people have learned to stay home if they want to produce anything deep.

Electronics Demonstrations BasicsA/C CircuitsPassive FiltersOther Passive CircuitsDiodesOp-AmpsMOSFETsTransistors (Bipolar)Combinational LogicSequential Logic555 Timer ChipTransmission LinesMemristorsTunnel DiodesSpark Gaps The Loom Your hands are, roughly speaking, 360 million years old. Before then, they were fins, which your fishy ancestors used to swim through oceans and rivers. Once those fins sprouted digits, they could propel your salamander-like ancestors across dry land. Fast forward 300 million years, and your hands had become fine-tuned for manipulations: your lemur-like ancestors used them to grab leaves and open up fruits. Within the past few million years, your hominin ancestors had fairly human hands, which they used to fashion tools for digging up tubers, butchering carcasses, and laying the groundwork for our global dominance today.

Articles on "Electricity" Why three prongs?Why do wall outlets have three holes? "Grounding" and safety. Right Angle CircuitryDo Lenz' Law and the Right Hand rule still work... after you've been turned INSIDE OUT by that greasy black Fog? "Static Electric" misconceptionsA list of things which gave me a warped view of Electrostatics. Once I recognized their existence, I was able to fight free of them. Weasel program Hamlet: Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?Polonius: By the mass, and 'tis like a camel, indeed.Hamlet: Methinks it is like a weasel.quote from Hamlet - the origin of the term The thought experiment was formulated by Richard Dawkins, and the first simulation written by him; various other implementations of the program have been written by others. Overview[edit]

Spectrum: A Robot That Balances on a Ball Dr. Masaaki Kumagai, director of the Robot Development Engineering Laboratory at Tohoku Gakuin University, in Tagajo City, Japan, has built wheeled robots, crawling robots, quadruped robots, biped robots, and biped robots on roller skates. Then one day a student suggested they build a robot that would balance on a ball. Dr. Kumagai thought it was a wonderful idea. A photo tour of the Large Hadron Collider Back in July, we were fortunate enough to have the opportunity to tour CERN, home of the Large Hadron Collider. In addition to getting some great information on how the machine gets protons up to speeds nearly that of light, and finding out the sorts of physics that scientists hope to find in its collisions, we also got a great view of some of the control rooms and hardware that help keep everything humming along. Unfortunately, with the LHC active, it wasn't possible to actually go down and see the massive detectors that capture the output of the proton collisions, but there's still a lot to see around CERN. To handle the interest generated by the LHC, CERN has built a new visitor's center to introduce the public to the work that goes on there. For this visit, however, the tour started across the street, next to the CERN gift shop (yes, it has a gift shop). Other hardware doesn't quite get this honorable treatment.

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