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Baphomet

Baphomet
"Bahomet" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Bahamut. The 19th century image of a Sabbatic Goat, created by Eliphas Levi. The arms bear the Latin words SOLVE (separate) and COAGULA (join together), i.e., the power of "binding and loosing" usurped from God and, according to Catholic tradition, from the ecclesiastical hierarchy acting as God's representative on Earth. The original goat pentagram first appeared in the book "La Clef de la Magie Noire" by French occultist Stanislas de Guaita, in 1897. This symbol would later become synonymous with Baphomet, and is commonly referred to as the Goat of Mendes or Sabbatic Goat. Baphomet (/ˈbæfɵmɛt/; from Medieval Latin Baphometh, Baffometi, Occitan Bafometz) is a term originally used to describe an idol or other deity that the Knights Templar were accused of worshiping, and that subsequently was incorporated into disparate occult and mystical traditions. §History[edit] The name Baphomet comes up in several of these confessions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baphomet

Secret clue on 400-year-old map may solve mystery of lost colony of Roanoke A secret clue on a 400-year-old map might solve the long-standing mystery of the lost colony of Roanoke. Researchers from the First Colony Foundation say they have found evidence that this lost colony went "native". The group of 115 people were sent to the New World to set up a new city in 1587 by Queen Elizabeth. She wanted to expand the British Empire and sent 90 men, 17 women and 11 children to do this – and they became known as the Roanoke Colony.

unmasking Baphomet « Sun & Shield Baphomet, the character pictured here, is a popular figure tied to many pagan rituals and organizations. He has also been referred to as “the talking goat’s head”, “the goat of Mendes,” and “the horned god.” Because this idol has ties to so many pagan groups, no one is 100% certain who used it first. Groups throughout history who have used depictions of Baphomet in their rituals include (but are not limited to) Islamic mystics, the Knights Templar, Kabbalah, Roman pagans, Greek pagans, Druids, witches (both Wiccans and black witches), satanists, and Freemasons. If anything, it shows that false religions have spiritual ties to each other and since they have those ties, it is no wonder that there is a push among all false religions to have a one world religion that preaches about all roads leading to “God.”

Christian mysticism Christian mysticism refers to the development of mystical practices and theory within Christianity. It has often been connected to mystical theology, especially in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox traditions. The attributes and means by which Christian mysticism is studied and practiced are varied and range from ecstatic visions of the soul's mystical union with God to simple prayerful contemplation of Holy Scripture (i.e., Lectio Divina).

Zhangzhung Zhangzhung (Tibetan: ཞང་ཞུང་ ; Tibetan pronunciation: [ɕaŋɕuŋ]; Chinese: 象雄; Chinese pinyin : Xiàngxióng) was an ancient culture and kingdom of western and northwestern Tibet, which pre-dates the culture of Tibetan Buddhism in Tibet. Zhangzhung culture is associated with the Bon religion, which in turn, has influenced the philosophies and practices of Tibetan Buddhism. Zhangzhung people are mentioned frequently in ancient Tibetan texts as the original rulers of central and western Tibet. Only in the last two decades have archaeologists been given access to do archaeological work in the areas once ruled by the Zhangzhung. Recently, a tentative match has been proposed between the Zhangzhung and an Iron Age culture now being uncovered on the Changtang plateau of northwestern Tibet.

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Pan (god) In Greek religion and mythology, Pan (/ˈpæn/;[1] Ancient Greek: Πᾶν, Pān) is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music, and companion of the nymphs.[2] His name originates within the Ancient Greek language, from the word paein (πάειν), meaning "to pasture."[3] He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. With his homeland in rustic Arcadia, he is recognized as the god of fields, groves, and wooded glens; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Pan to be the god of theatrical criticism.[4]

Language of the birds In mythology, medieval literature and occultism, the language of the birds is postulated as a mystical, perfect divine language, green language, adamic language, enochian language, angelic language or a mythical or magical language used by birds to communicate with the initiated. History[edit] In Indo-European religion, the behavior of birds has long been used for the purposes of divination by augurs. According to a suggestion by Walter Burkert, these customs may have their roots in the Paleolithic when, during the Ice Age, early humans looked for carrion by observing scavenging birds.[1] There are also examples of contemporary bird-human communication and symbiosis. In North America, ravens have been known to lead wolves (and native hunters) to prey they otherwise would be unable to consume.[2][3] In Africa, the Greater Honeyguide is known to guide humans to beehives in the hope that the hive will be incapacitated and opened for them.

Kalachakra The Kalachakra (Sanskrit: कालचक्र Kālacakra, Tibetan: དུས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ།, Wylie: dus kyi 'khor lo; Mongolian: Цогт Цагийн Хүрдэн Tsogt Tsagiin Hurden; Chinese: 時輪) is a term used in Vajrayana Buddhism that means wheel of time or "time-cycles". The word Kālacakra is usually used to refer to a very complex teaching and practice in Tibetan Buddhism. Although the teaching is very advanced and esoteric, there is a tradition of offering it to large public audiences. Sir Francis and the New Temple of God Location is everything by Petter Amundsen Norway has for a couple of years been swept by an Anti-Stratfordian craze. Even in schools some teachers will blatantly inform their students that the authorship of Shakespearean plays is open for debate, and that there is no correct answer to quiz questions like: “who wrote Hamlet?”, apart from being “uncertain”.

Gehenna Valley of Hinnom, c. 1900 Valley of Hinnom redirects here In the Hebrew Bible, the site was initially where apostate Israelites and followers of various Ba'als and Caananite gods, including Moloch, sacrificed their children by fire (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6). Thereafter it was deemed to be cursed (Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6).[1] In Jewish, Christian and Islamic scripture, Gehenna is a destination of the wicked.[2] This is different from the more neutral Sheol/Hades, the abode of the dead, though the King James version of the Bible translates both with the Anglo-Saxon word Hell. Etymology[edit]

Doppelgänger In fiction and folklore, a doppelgänger or doppelgaenger (/ˈdɒp(ə)lˌɡɛŋə/ or /-ˌɡæŋə/; German: [ˈdɔpəlˌɡɛŋɐ] ( ), literally "double-goer") is a look-alike or double of a living person who is sometimes portrayed as a harbinger of bad luck. In some traditions, a doppelgänger seen by a person's relative or friend portends illness or danger while seeing one's own doppelgänger is said to be an omen of death. In contemporary vernacular, the word doppelgänger is often used in a more general sense to identify any person that physically or perhaps even behaviorally resembles another person. Spelling[edit] The word doppelgänger is a loanword from German Doppelgänger, consisting of the two substantives Doppel (double) Gänger (walker or goer).[1][2] The singular and plural form are the same in German, but English usually prefers the plural "doppelgangers."

Shambhala In Tibetan Buddhist and Hindu traditions, Shambhala (also spelled Shambala or Shamballa; Sanskrit: शंभाल; Tibetan: བདེ་འབྱུང་; Wylie: bde 'byung, pron. de-jung; Chinese: 香巴拉; pinyin: xiāngbālā) is a kingdom hidden somewhere in Inner Asia. It is mentioned in various ancient texts, including the Kalachakra Tantra[2] and the ancient texts of the Zhang Zhung culture which predated Tibetan Buddhism in western Tibet. The Bön[3] scriptures speak of a closely related land called Olmolungring.

Bacon and Spiritual Consciousness by Mark Finnan While much is known about Francis Bacon’s life-long interest in the advancement of learning, the acquisition of knowledge and his experiments in the natural world, all of which has had impact on our lives today, relatively little attention has been given to the spiritual influences, internal and external, that affected Bacon’s own consciousness, shaped his character and informed his work. While the founders of the Francis Bacon Society believed that his pursuit of knowledge was as much about spiritual renewal as it was about developing a scientific approach to revealing nature’s secrets or initiating a literary renaissance, this aspect of Bacon’s life and work seems to have, in the last few decades at least, taken second place to the intellectually intriguing and enticing exercise of discovering and deciphering codes related to the Shakespeare authorship question. One was the English version of New Atlantis, Bacon’s most spiritually-infused literary work.

Typhon Typhon was described in pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheke, as the largest and most fearsome of all creatures. His human upper half reached as high as the stars, and his hands reached east and west. Instead of a human head, a hundred dragon heads erupted from his neck and shoulders (some, however, depict him as having a human head, with the dragon heads replacing the fingers on his hands). His bottom half consisted of gigantic viper coils that could reach the top of his head when stretched out and constantly made a hissing noise.

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