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Citing Yourself

Citing Yourself
If you cite or quote your previous work, treat yourself as the author and your own previous course work as an unpublished paper, as shown in the APA publication manual. For example, if Marie Briggs wanted to cite a paper she wrote at Walden in 2012, her in-text citation might look like this: Briggs (2012) asserted that previous literature on the psychology of tightrope walkers was faulty in that it "presumed that risk-taking behaviors align neatly with certain personality traits or disorders" (p. 4). And in the reference list: Briggs, M. (2012). manuscript, Walden University. If your original work contained citations from other sources, you will need to include those same citations in the new work as well, per APA. According to Briggs (2012), recent psychologists such as "Presley and Johnson (2009) too quickly attributed risk-taking to genetic factors, ignoring the social family issues that often influence the decision to explore pursuits such as tightrope walking" (p. 5). Related:  Avoiding Plagiarism

Find, Read, & Cite Journal Articles Other useful links: Basics Tutorial (w/audio), APA Style 6th Ed. Annotated Sample Paper, APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Summary Guidelines for Unbiased Language, APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Language Use for Gender,APA Style 6th Ed. Finding articles: Searching PSYCHINFO Access the PSYCHINFO (and full-text PsycArticles if available) database through your library's web site (e.g., Trexler Library). (1) Limit your search to English language only articles (unless you read another language). (2) Students in Introductory psychology courses may want to limit your search to only the types of documents your professor is allowing for the assignment. (3) When searching in PSYCHINFO, start by checking to see that each of your search terms is a good one. (4) After you know each individual search term is legitimate, then type in multiple terms to try to specify your search. (5) Virtually ANY topic you can think has been addressed by at least one article in the millions referenced in PSYCHINFO. Finding.

Home - Citing Your Sources - Research Guides at Southern New Hampshire University - Shapiro Library What exactly is plagiarism? Let's go to a source! As defined by Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed. to plagiarize is: "to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own : use (another's production) without crediting the source : to commit literary theft : present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source." What are some examples of plagiarism? Copying a sentence, whole paragraph, or large blocks of text from another source without citing it.Copying from an online source or web site, such as Wikipedia.Copying someone else's work, including your friends and classmates.Purchasing and/or downloading a paper from the Internet and turning it in as your own.Taking someone else's ideas and words and re-phrasing it in your own words, without citing the original source.Not using quotation marks properly for direct quotations.Turning in someone's else work as your own. What do you NOT have to cite? Tips on Avoiding Plagiarism

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing It's Here: A new look for the Purdue OWL! The new version of the Purdue OWL is available at Worry not! Summary: This handout is intended to help you become more comfortable with the uses of and distinctions among quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2013-02-15 09:44:45 What are the differences among quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing? These three ways of incorporating other writers' work into your own writing differ according to the closeness of your writing to the source writing. Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Why use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries? Quotations, paraphrases, and summaries serve many purposes. How to use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries

You can't make this stuff up: Plagiarism guideline paper retracted for...plagiarism This could be an April Fools’ joke. But it isn’t. In what can only be described as an ironic twist, the Indian Journal of Dermatology is retracting a paper that presents guidelines on plagiarism for…wait for it… Plagiarism. Here’s the notice: The article “Development of a guideline to approach plagiarism in Indian scenario” [1] is being retracted as the manuscript has been found to be copied from the first round questionnaire of the dissertation entitled ‘Developing a comprehensive guideline for overcoming and preventing plagiarism at the international level based on expert opinion with the Delphi method’ by Dr. The Indian Journal of Dermatology has taken a hard line on plagiarism in the past, banning at least three groups of authors, by our count. Indian Journal of Dermatology maintains a strict principle of absolute zero tolerance in matters related to plagiarism. Shamim’s paper in the Indian Journal of Dermatology includes definitions and strategies to prevent and detect plagiarism.

APA Formatting and Style Guide Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Reference citations in text are covered on pages 261-268 of the Publication Manual. What follows are some general guidelines for referring to the works of others in your essay. Note: On pages 117-118, the Publication Manual suggests that authors of research papers should use the past tense or present perfect tense for signal phrases that occur in the literature review and procedure descriptions (for example, Jones (1998) found or Jones (1998) has found...). Contexts other than traditionally-structured research writing may permit the simple present tense (for example, Jones (1998) finds). When using APA format, follow the author-date method of in-text citation. Regardless of how they are referenced, all sources that are cited in the text must appear in the reference list at the end of the paper.

Encyclopedia Britannica Ambiguous Sentences I came across this headline in the Wall Street Journal: Republicans Grill IRS Chief Over Lost Emails This type of sentence has great possibilities because of its two different interpretations: Republicans harshly question the chief about the emailsRepublicans cook the chief using email as the fuel It’s a perfect tool to: demonstrate careful reading, showcase the need for editing, and encourage creativity and divergent thinking. Even More Meanings The ambiguous headline took me back to my college days, when a professor shared this sentence: I saw a man on a hill with a telescope. It seems like a simple statement, until you begin to unpack the many alternate meanings: There’s a man on a hill, and I’m watching him with my telescope. See how many meanings your students can catch! More Examples Here are some other ambiguous sentences (more at this wikipedia page): We saw her duck. He fed her cat food. Look at the dog with one eye. Include A Classic Challenging Parts of Speech Create Your Own

Avoiding Plagiarism Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. PaizLast Edited: 2014-10-10 09:01:36 Research-based writing in American institutions, both educational and corporate, is filled with rules that writers, particularly beginners, aren't aware of or don't know how to follow. While some rhetorical traditions may not insist so heavily on documenting sources of words, ideas, images, sounds, etc., American academic rhetorical tradition does. (Purdue University students will want to make sure that they are familiar with Purdue's official academic dishonesty policy as well as any additional policies that their instructors have implemented.) Intellectual challenges in American academic writing There are some intellectual challenges that all students are faced with when writing.

OWL Contributors:Allen Brizee.Summary: This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. The following sections outline the generally accepted structure for an academic argument paper. You may also use the following Purdue OWL resources to help you with your argument paper: Introduction The introduction is the broad beginning of the paper that answers three important questions: What is this? You should answer these questions by doing the following: Set the context –provide general information about the main idea, explaining the situation so the reader can make sense of the topic and the claims you make and supportState why the main idea is important –tell the reader why he or she should care and keep reading. First, I will define key terms for my argument, and then I will provide some background of the situation.

How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style by Chelsea Lee Perhaps the most common question we get about APA Style is “How do I cite a website?” or “How do I cite something I found on a website?” First, to cite a website in general, but not a specific document on that website, see this FAQ. Once you’re at the level of citing a particular page or document, the key to writing the reference list entry is to determine what kind of content the page has. What seems to flummox our readers is what to do when the content doesn’t fall into an easily defined area. Content in that egg white area may seem confusing to cite, but the template for references from this area is actually very simple, with only four pieces (author, date, title, and source): That format description in brackets is used only when the format is something out of the ordinary, such as a blog post or lecture notes; otherwise, it's not necessary. Examples of Online References Here’s an example where no author is identified in this online news article:

Writing the Essay Intro and Conclusion Your essay lacks only two paragraphs now: the introduction and the conclusion. These paragraphs will give the reader a point of entry to and a point of exit from your essay. Introduction The introduction should be designed to attract the reader's attention and give her an idea of the essay's focus. Begin with an attention grabber. Conclusion The conclusion brings closure to the reader, summing up your points or providing a final perspective on your topic. All the conclusion needs is three or four strong sentences which do not need to follow any set formula.

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