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Maps on the Web

Maps on the Web

http://mapsontheweb.zoom-maps.com/

Related:  Mappe socioculturalicartothèquesThe Blue MarbleTÉR / IDŐkittyaj

How Much Land the Federal Government Owns Will Surprise You The rough beauty of the American West seems as far as you can get from the polished corridors of power in Washington DC. Until you look at the title to the land. The federal government owns large tracts of the western states: from a low of 29.9% in Montana, already more than the national average, up to a whopping 84.5% in Nevada. This map, depicting the distribution and share of federal land per state, was first published on this blog way back in 2008. Nevertheless, it keeps accumulating comments and hits at a steady pace, and is still frequently shared around. Unlike hundreds of other random maps, this one has become a perennial.

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States ESSENTIAL to an understanding of the history of the United States is some acquaintance with the natural environment that has conditioned and modified the growth of the nation. For this reason the present series of maps illustrating important aspects of the natural environment precedes the more strictly historical parts of the Atlas. The institutions and population of the United States are predominantly of European origin.

Solar Storm Dumps Gigawatts into Earth's Upper Atmosphere Solar Storm Dumps Gigawatts into Earth's Upper Atmosphere March 22, 2012: A recent flurry of eruptions on the sun did more than spark pretty auroras around the poles. NASA-funded researchers say the solar storms of March 8th through 10th dumped enough energy in Earth’s upper atmosphere to power every residence in New York City for two years. “This was the biggest dose of heat we’ve received from a solar storm since 2005,” says Martin Mlynczak of NASA Langley Research Center. Roads to Rome Section 4 The question if really all roads lead to Rome bothered Benedikt Groß since quite a while. With the support of Philipp Schmitt the two set out on a digital navigation quest. The result of this quest are the maps documented by Raphael Reimann on the pages you are currently viewing. Benedikt, Philipp and Raphael are members of moovel lab. A creative working environment researching the future of transportation and many related topics.

United States Constitution The Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and ratified by conventions in eleven States. It went into effect on March 4, 1789.[2] Since the Constitution was adopted, it has been amended twenty-seven times. The first ten amendments (along with two others that were not ratified at the time) were proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789, and were ratified by the necessary three-fourths of the States on December 15, 1791.[3] These first ten amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. The Constitution is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law.

The Geography of Empathy and Apathy Compassion is tricky. Solidarity is a minefield. Did you add the French tricolour to your Facebook profile picture? If not, are you a heartless bastard, or worse, an apologist for the terrorists who killed over 120 innocent civilians in Paris? HARVARD Collection Digital Maps The Harvard Map Collection is one of the oldest and largest collections of cartographic materials in the United States with over 500,000 items. Resources range from 16th century globes to modern maps and geographic information systems (GIS) layers. A selection of our materials has been digitally imaged and is offered both as true picture images and georeferenced copies. This Virtual Collection includes those maps and atlases that are available through the Harvard Image Delivery Service. Those maps that have been georeferenced are available through the Harvard Geospatial Library. Therefore, many of the maps listed will have two records, one for the image that is true to the original and the other a georeferenced image.

Deep oceans warming at an alarming rate Two newly published studies are helping scientists trace millions of years of Antarctica's climate history, including an age when parts of the continent were as warm as the California coast is today. One of the studies focuses on an ice core taken from Antarctica's Taylor Glacier, and uses readings of radioactive krypton to confirm that the sample goes back 120,000 years. The researchers behind that study, appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, say the same technique could provide more accurate dates for ice samples going back as far as 1.5 million years. "That is very exciting, because a lot of interesting things happened with the earth's climate prior to 800,000 years ago that we currently cannot study in the ice-core record," Christo Buizert, a researcher at Oregon State University who is the study's lead author, said in a news release. Xavier Fain / NSF Now researchers plan to go after Antarctica's oldest ice.

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