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Old Testament

Old Testament
The Old Testament is the first section of the Christian Bible, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible, a collection of religious writings by ancient Israelites. It is the counterpart to the New Testament, the Christian Bible's second section. The Old Testament canon varies between Christian denominations; Protestants accept only the books found in the canon of the Hebrew Bible, dividing them into 39 books, while Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox churches accept somewhat larger collections of writings. The Old Testament consists of many distinct books written, compiled, and edited by various authors[3] over a period of centuries. It is not entirely clear at what point the parameters of the Hebrew Bible, the basis for the Christian Old Testament, were fixed. Content[edit] The Old Testament contains 39 (Protestant) or 46 (Catholic) or more (Orthodox and other) books, divided, very broadly, into the Pentateuch (Torah), the historical books, the "wisdom" books and the prophets. Related:  belief

Islam Islam (/ˈɪslɑːm/;[note 1] Arabic: الإسلام‎, al-ʾIslām IPA: [ælʔɪsˈlæːm] ( )[note 2]) is a monotheistic and Abrahamic religion articulated by the Qur'an, an Islamic holy book considered by its adherents to be the verbatim word of God (Allāh), and for the vast majority of adherents, also by the teachings and normative example (called the Sunnah and composed of hadith) of Muhammad (c. 570–8 June 632 CE), considered by most of them to be the last prophet of God. An adherent of Islam is called a Muslim. Most Muslims are of two denominations: Sunni (75–90%)[8] or Shia (10–20%).[9] About 13% of Muslims live in Indonesia,[10] the largest Muslim-majority country, 25% in South Asia,[10] 20% in the Middle East,[11] and 15% in Sub-Saharan Africa.[12] Sizable minorities are also found in Europe, China, Russia, and the Americas. Converts and immigrant communities are found in almost every part of the world (see Islam by country). Etymology and meaning Articles of faith God Angels Revelations Prophets

Second Temple Model of Herod's Temple (a renovation of the Second Temple) in the Israel Museum. It is unknown what the Second Temple looked like before this major renovation. The Second Temple was an important Jewish Holy Temple (Hebrew: בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי‎, Bet HaMikdash HaSheni; Arabic: بيت القدس‎: Beit al-Quds) which stood on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem during the Second Temple period, between 516 BCE and 70 CE. It replaced the First Temple which was destroyed in 586 BCE, when the Jews of the Kingdom of Judah went to exile, known as Babylonian Captivity. Jewish eschatology includes a belief that the Second Temple will in turn be replaced by a future Third Temple. History[edit] Flavius Josephus records that Herod the Great completely rebuilt the Temple in 20-18 BCE, even going so far as to replace the foundation stones and to smooth off the surface of the Temple Mount. Rebuilding the Temple[edit] The Samaritans made proposals for co-operation in the work. Herod's Temple[edit] Platform[edit]

Torah Torah (/ˈtɔːrə/; Hebrew: תּוֹרָה, "Instruction, Teaching"), or what is often referred to in English as "Pentateuch" (/ˈpɛntəˌtuːk, -ˌtjuːk/), is the central concept in the religious Judaic tradition. It has a range of meanings: it can most specifically mean the first five books of the twenty-four books of the Tanakh; it usually includes the rabbinic commentaries in it; the term Torah means instruction and offers a way of life for those who follow it; it can mean the continued narrative from Genesis to the end of the Tanakh; it can even mean the totality of Jewish teaching, culture and practice.[1] Common to all these meanings, Torah consists of the foundational narrative of the Jewish people: their call into being by God, their trials and tribulations, and their covenant with their God, which involves following a way of life embodied in a set of moral and religious obligations and civil laws (halakha). Meaning and names[edit] Torah as Pentateuch[edit] Contents[edit] Genesis[edit]

Abijah Russian name[edit] The variant used in the Russian language is "А́вия" (Aviya),[1] with "А́бия"[1] or "Аби́я" (Abiya),[2] being older forms.[1] Included into various, often handwritten, church calendars throughout the 17th–19th centuries, it was omitted from the official Synodal Menologium at the end of the 19th century.[3] In 1924–1930, the name (as "Ави́я", a form of "Abiya"[2]) was included into various Soviet calendars,[3] which included the new and often artificially created names promoting the new Soviet realities and encouraging the break with the tradition of using the names in the Synodal Menologia.[4] In Russian it is only used as a female name.[1][2] Diminutives of this name include "А́ва" (Ava) and "Ви́я" (Viya).[1] Old Testament characters[edit] Women[edit] Men[edit] References[edit] Notes[edit] Sources[edit]

Saul The oldest accounts of Saul's life and reign are found in the Books of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. A similar, yet different account is given in the Qur'an. The historicity of Saul's kingdom has been called into question by some historians.[1] Biblical account[edit] House of King Saul[edit] Saul also had a concubine named Rizpah, daughter of Aiah, who bore him two sons, Armoni and Mephibosheth. (2 Samuel 21:8) Saul offered Merab to David as a wife after his victory over Goliath, but David was not interested in the arrangement. (1 Samuel 18:17-19) Saul then gave his other daughter Michal in marriage to David, (1 Samuel 18:20-27) but when David became Saul's rival to the kingship, Saul gave Michal in marriage to Palti, son of Laish. (1 Samuel 25:44) Armoni and Mephibosheth (Saul's sons with his concubine, Rizpah) were given by David along with the five sons of Merab (Saul's daughter)[4] to the Gibeonites, who killed them. (2 Samuel 21:8-9) Michal was childless. (2 Samuel 6:23) Rejection[edit]

Ish-bosheth Reign and death[edit] Illustration from the Morgan Bible depicting the death of Ish-bosheth. However, after the death of King Saul, the tribe of Judah seceded from the rule of the House of Saul by proclaiming David as its king, and war ensued. (2 Samuel 2:12) David's faction eventually prevailed against Ish-bosheth's (2 Samuel 3:1), but the war did not come to a close until Abner joined David. (2 Samuel 3:6) David's terms for peace required that Michal (Saul's daughter and Ish-bosheth's sister who had been David's wife before David and Saul fell out with each other) be returned to him, which Ish-bosheth fulfilled. (2 Samuel 3:14) After Abner's death Ish-bosheth seems to have given up hope of retaining power. (2 Samuel 4:1) Ish-bosheth was assassinated in c 1005 B.C. by two of his own army-captains, Rechab and Baanah (2 Samuel 4:5), who expected a reward from David because of this. The names[edit] The name Ish-bosheth[edit] The other name: Ashba'al[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Saul The oldest accounts of Saul's life and reign are found in the Books of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. A similar, yet different account is given in the Qur'an. The historicity of Saul's kingdom has been called into question by some historians.[1] Biblical account[edit] House of King Saul[edit] Saul also had a concubine named Rizpah, daughter of Aiah, who bore him two sons, Armoni and Mephibosheth. (2 Samuel 21:8) Saul offered Merab to David as a wife after his victory over Goliath, but David was not interested in the arrangement. (1 Samuel 18:17-19) Saul then gave his other daughter Michal in marriage to David, (1 Samuel 18:20-27) but when David became Saul's rival to the kingship, Saul gave Michal in marriage to Palti, son of Laish. (1 Samuel 25:44) Armoni and Mephibosheth (Saul's sons with his concubine, Rizpah) were given by David along with the five sons of Merab (Saul's daughter)[4] to the Gibeonites, who killed them. (2 Samuel 21:8-9) Michal was childless. (2 Samuel 6:23) Rejection[edit]

Solomon's Temple Because of the religious sensitivities involved, and the politically volatile situation in Jerusalem, only limited archaeological surveys of the Temple Mount have been conducted. No excavations have been allowed on the Temple Mount during modern times. An Ivory pomegranate mentions priests in the house of YHWH, and an inscription recording the Temple's restoration under Jehoash have appeared on the antiquities market, but the authenticity of both has been challenged and they remain the subject of controversy. The Temple according to the Bible[edit] In an artistic representation, King Solomon dedicates the Temple at Jerusalem (painting by James Tissot or follower, c. 1896–1902) Architectural description in the Bible[edit] Several temples in Mesopotamia, many in Egypt, and some of the Phoenicians are now known. The detailed descriptions provided in the Tanakh are the sources for reconstructions of its appearance. Most Holy Place[edit] The color scheme of the veil was symbolic. Hekhal[edit]

Family tree of the Bible The following is a family tree of the people of the Bible. Family tree[edit] Adam to Noah[edit] Sons of Noah[edit] Main article: Sons of Noah The Table of Nations or Sons of Noah is an extensive list of descendants of Noah which appears in Genesis 10 of the Hebrew Bible, representing an ethnology from an Iron Age Levantine perspective. Japhetic[edit] Japhetic refers to the descendants of Japheth, son of Noah. Hamitic[edit] Semitic[edit] Semitic refers to the descendants of Shem, son of Noah. Genesis 25:2-4 also mentions Jokshan's offsprings (Sheba and Dedan). Abraham's family[edit] Israelites[edit] Outline[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

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