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Sea monster

Sea monster
Sea monsters are sea-dwelling mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size. Marine monsters can take many forms, including sea dragons, sea serpents, or multi-armed beasts. They can be slimy or scaly and are often pictured threatening ships or spouting jets of water. The definition of a "monster" is subjective, and some sea monsters may have been based on scientifically accepted creatures such as whales and types of giant and colossal squid. Sightings and legends[edit] Plate ca. 1544 depicting various sea monsters; compiled from the Carta Marina. Historically, decorative drawings of heraldic dolphins and sea monsters were frequently used to illustrate maps, such as the Carta marina. Sea serpent reported by Hans Egede, Bishop of Greenland, in 1734. Sea monster accounts are found in virtually all cultures that have contact with the sea. a most terrible creature, resembling nothing they saw before. It is debatable what these modern "monsters" might be. See also[edit] Related:  legend

Loch Ness Monster The Loch Ness Monster is a cryptid, a creature whose existence has been suggested but is not discovered or documented by the scientific community.[3] It is reputedly a large unknown animal that inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal's existence has varied since it was first brought to the world's attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings. Origins Loch Ness History Saint Columba (6th century) The earliest report of a monster associated with the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Spicers (1933) In August 1933 a motorcyclist named Arthur Grant claimed to have nearly hit the creature while approaching Abriachan on the north-eastern shore, at about 1 a.m. on a moonlit night. Chief Constable William Fraser (1938) C.

Undine (alchemy) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Undine, Undina or Ondine are sometimes interchangeable and may refer to: In literature and painting[edit] In music and ballet[edit] In opera[edit] In film[edit] In science[edit] In ships[edit] HMS Undine, eight ships in the Royal NavySMS Undine, a ship in the German High Seas FleetUSS Undine, two ships in the United States Navy In video games[edit] In popular culture[edit] Others[edit] Ondine, a typeface (font) designed by Adrian FrutigerVilla Undine, a resort architecture mansion in Binz, Rugia Island, GermanyUndine, New Brunswick, Canada See also[edit] Ondine's curse, a medical conditionUndine Barge Club, an amateur rowing club in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

John William Waterhouse: Comprehensive Painting Gallery Each-uisge History[edit] The each-uisge, a supernatural water horse found in the Highlands of Scotland, is supposedly the most dangerous water-dwelling creature in the British Isles. Often mistaken for the Kelpie (which inhabits streams and rivers), the each-uisge lives in the sea, sea lochs, and fresh water lochs. In its human form it is said to appear as a handsome man, and can be recognised as a mythological creature only by the water weeds in its hair; because of this, people in the Highlands were often wary of lone animals and strangers by the waters edge, near where the each-uisge was reputed to live. Along with its human victims, cattle and sheep were also often prey to the each-uisge, and it could be lured out of the water by the smell of roasted meat. A blacksmith from Raasay lost his daughter to the each-uisge. See also[edit] References[edit]

Robin Hood - The Facts and the Fiction - Legends, Stories, Songs Kelpie The kelpie is a supernatural water horse from Celtic folklore that is believed to haunt the rivers and lochs of Scotland and Ireland; the name may be from Scottish Gaelic cailpeach or colpach "heifer, colt".[1] Folklore[edit] In mythology, the kelpie is described as a strong and powerful horse. The fable of the kelpie varies by region. Similar creatures[edit] There are many mythological creatures similar to the kelpie, such as the "nuggle" from Orkney, and a "shoopiltee," or "njogel," or "tangi" from Shetland. In popular culture[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Sources[edit]

jewish folklore Middle Ages[edit] There is considerable evidence of Jewish people helping the spread of Eastern folktales in Europe.[2] Besides these tales from foreign sources, Jews either collected or composed others which were told throughout the European ghettos, and were collected in Yiddish in the "Maaseb├╝cher".[2] Numbers of the folktales contained in these collections were also published separately.[3] It is, however, difficult to call many of them folktales in the sense given above, since nothing fairy-like or supernormal occurs in them.[2] Legends[edit] There are a few definitely Jewish legends of the Middle Ages which partake of the character of folktales, such as those of the Jewish pope Andreas and of the golem, or that relating to the wall of the Rashi chapel, which moved backward in order to save the life of a poor woman who was in danger of being crushed by a passing carriage in the narrow way. Aggadah and folklore compilations[edit] See also[edit] Jewish mythology References[edit]

Selkie Selkies (also known as silkies or selchies) are mythological creatures found in Scottish, Irish, and Faroese folklore.[1] Similar creatures are described in the Icelandic traditions.[2] The word derives from earlier Scots selich, (from Old English seolh meaning seal).[3] Selkies are said to live as seals in the sea but shed their skin to become human on land. The legend is apparently most common in Orkney and Shetland[4] and is very similar to those of swan maidens.[5] Legends[edit] Male selkies are described as being very handsome in their human form, and having great seductive powers over human women. They typically seek those who are dissatisfied with their life, such as married women waiting for their fishermen husbands. Stories concerning selkies are generally romantic tragedies. In the Faroe Islands there are two versions of the story of the Selkie or Seal Wife. A seal-woman steps out from her seal coat on the beach Selkies are not always faithless lovers. Theories of origins[edit]

Myth, Legend, Folklore, Ghosts Apollo and the Greek Muses Updated July 2010 COMPREHENSIVE SITES ON MYTHOLOGY ***** The Encyclopedia Mythica - SEARCH - Areas - Image Gallery - Genealogy tables - Mythic Heroes Probert Encyclopaedia - Mythology Gods, Heroes, and MythDictionary of Mythology What is Myth? MESOPOTAMIAN MYTHOLOGYThe Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ Sumerian Mythology FAQ Sumerian Mythology Sumerian Gods and Goddesses Sumerian Myths SUMERIAN RELIGION Mythology's Mythinglinks: the Tigris-Euphrates Region of the Ancient Near East Gods, Goddesses, Demons and Monsters of Mesopotamia The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ More info on Ancient Mesopotamia can be found on my Ancient River Valley Civilizations page. GREEK MYTHOLOGYOrigins of Greek MythologyGreek Mythology - MythWeb Greek-Gods.info (plus a fun QUIZ)Ancient Greek Religion Family Tree of Greek Mythology Greek Names vs. VARIOUS FAIRIES, ELVES, UNICORNS, MERMAIDS, & OTHER MYTHICAL TOPICS HERE BE DRAGONS!

Finfolk Finfolkaheem[edit] According to folklore, the under water dwelling of the Finfolk, known as Finfolkaheem (literally "Finfolk's Home")[1] is regarded as the place of origin for the Finfolk, and their ancestral home. A fantastic under water palace with massive crystal halls, Finfolkaheem is surrounded, inside and out, by ornate gardens of multi-coloured seaweed. Human Abduction[edit] Unlike the "Selkie" made famous by the "The Great Silkie of Sule Skerry", the Finfolk are neither romantic nor friendly. Married Life[edit] Whatever the method of abduction, the (often screaming) [3] hapless human captive is ferried away to the floating, and sometimes disappearing, mystical island of Hildaland where the rest of one's days are spent performing rigorous duties as either the husband to the Finwife, or wife to the Finman. The Finwife[edit] The Finman[edit] The Finman is described as being tall, dark and thin with a stern, gloomy face. Hildaland and Eynhallow[edit] References[edit]

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