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Loch Ness Monster

Loch Ness Monster
The Loch Ness Monster is a cryptid, a creature whose existence has been suggested but is not discovered or documented by the scientific community.[3] It is reputedly a large unknown animal that inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal's existence has varied since it was first brought to the world's attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings. Origins Loch Ness History Saint Columba (6th century) The earliest report of a monster associated with the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Spicers (1933) In August 1933 a motorcyclist named Arthur Grant claimed to have nearly hit the creature while approaching Abriachan on the north-eastern shore, at about 1 a.m. on a moonlit night. Chief Constable William Fraser (1938) C. Related:  legend

Robin Hood - The Facts and the Fiction - Legends, Stories, Songs Sea monster Sea monsters are sea-dwelling mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size. Marine monsters can take many forms, including sea dragons, sea serpents, or multi-armed beasts. They can be slimy or scaly and are often pictured threatening ships or spouting jets of water. The definition of a "monster" is subjective, and some sea monsters may have been based on scientifically accepted creatures such as whales and types of giant and colossal squid. Sightings and legends[edit] Plate ca. 1544 depicting various sea monsters; compiled from the Carta Marina. Historically, decorative drawings of heraldic dolphins and sea monsters were frequently used to illustrate maps, such as the Carta marina. Sea serpent reported by Hans Egede, Bishop of Greenland, in 1734. Sea monster accounts are found in virtually all cultures that have contact with the sea. a most terrible creature, resembling nothing they saw before. It is debatable what these modern "monsters" might be. See also[edit]

John William Waterhouse: Comprehensive Painting Gallery jewish folklore Middle Ages[edit] There is considerable evidence of Jewish people helping the spread of Eastern folktales in Europe.[2] Besides these tales from foreign sources, Jews either collected or composed others which were told throughout the European ghettos, and were collected in Yiddish in the "Maasebücher".[2] Numbers of the folktales contained in these collections were also published separately.[3] It is, however, difficult to call many of them folktales in the sense given above, since nothing fairy-like or supernormal occurs in them.[2] Legends[edit] There are a few definitely Jewish legends of the Middle Ages which partake of the character of folktales, such as those of the Jewish pope Andreas and of the golem, or that relating to the wall of the Rashi chapel, which moved backward in order to save the life of a poor woman who was in danger of being crushed by a passing carriage in the narrow way. Aggadah and folklore compilations[edit] See also[edit] Jewish mythology References[edit]

Myth, Legend, Folklore, Ghosts Apollo and the Greek Muses Updated July 2010 COMPREHENSIVE SITES ON MYTHOLOGY ***** The Encyclopedia Mythica - SEARCH - Areas - Image Gallery - Genealogy tables - Mythic Heroes Probert Encyclopaedia - Mythology Gods, Heroes, and MythDictionary of Mythology What is Myth? MESOPOTAMIAN MYTHOLOGYThe Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ Sumerian Mythology FAQ Sumerian Mythology Sumerian Gods and Goddesses Sumerian Myths SUMERIAN RELIGION Mythology's Mythinglinks: the Tigris-Euphrates Region of the Ancient Near East Gods, Goddesses, Demons and Monsters of Mesopotamia The Assyro-Babylonian Mythology FAQ More info on Ancient Mesopotamia can be found on my Ancient River Valley Civilizations page. GREEK MYTHOLOGYOrigins of Greek MythologyGreek Mythology - MythWeb Greek-Gods.info (plus a fun QUIZ)Ancient Greek Religion Family Tree of Greek Mythology Greek Names vs. VARIOUS FAIRIES, ELVES, UNICORNS, MERMAIDS, & OTHER MYTHICAL TOPICS HERE BE DRAGONS!

Fairy tale For a comparison of fairy tale with other kinds of stories, such as myths, legends and fable, see Traditional story. Fairy tales are found in oral and in literary form. The history of the fairy tale is particularly difficult to trace because only the literary forms can survive. The older fairy tales were intended for an audience of adults, as well as children, but they were associated with children as early as the writings of the précieuses; the Brothers Grimm titled their collection Children's and Household Tales, and the link with children has only grown stronger with time. Folklorists have classified fairy tales in various ways. Terminology[edit] Definition[edit] In terms of aesthetic values, Italo Calvino cited the fairy tale as a prime example of "quickness" in literature, because of the economy and concision of the tales.[18] History of the genre[edit] Originally, stories that we would now call fairy tales were not marked out as a separate genre. Folk and literary[edit] History[edit]

Grimm Brothers' Home Page compiled by D. L. Ashliman © 1999-2013 Contents Return to: Chronology of their life 1785. 1786. The children of Philipp Wilhelm Grimm and Dorothea GrimmFriedrich Hermann Georg Grimm (1783-1784) Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm (1785-1863) Wilhelm Carl Grimm (1786-1859) Carl Friedrich Grimm (1787-1852) Ferdinand Philipp Grimm (1788-1844) Ludwig Emil Grimm (1790-1863) Friedrich Grimm (1791-1792) Charlotte (Lotte) Amalie Hassenpflug, neé Grimm (1793-1833) Georg Eduard Grimm (1794-1795) 1791. 1796. 1798. 1802. 1803. 1806. 1808. 1812. 1814. 1816, 1818. 1819. 1825. 1829-1830. 1837-1841. 1842-1852. 1859. 1863. Return to the table of contents. What they wrote In addition to the works listed below, the Grimms (especially Jacob) wrote many substantive articles, reviews, forewords, and chapters, and published numerous editions and translations. Major joint publications of the "Brothers Grimm" The Grimms' first collection of folktales was not published during their lifetime. Major individual works of Jacob Grimm 1.

IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA Irish Writers OnlineIrish PlayographyStudy Ireland: Poetry - BBCIrish Women Writers - M. OckerbloomIreland Literature GuidePoetry Ireland / Éigse ÉireannEarly Irish Lyric Poetry - Kuno MeyerSonnets from Ireland - E. BlomquistColum's Anthology of Irish Verse - Bartleby.comBREAC - Digital Journal of Irish Studies Medieval Celtic ManuscriptsThe Book of KellsCarmina GadelicaCELT Irish Electronic Texts Irish Writers OnlineIreland Literature ExchangeBibliography of 19th-c. Jonathan SwiftJonathan Swift ArchiveJonathan Swift Biography - IncompetechGulliver's Travels - U. Bram StokerDraculaBram Stoker Biography - Classic Literature LibraryBram Stoker's Dracula - Carstens smith Oscar WildeThe Official Home Page of Oscar WildeWilde Biography - BBCOscar Wilde OnlineCELT: Oscar WildePoetry of Oscar Wilde - Bartleby.com George Bernard ShawShaw Biography - C. William Butler YeatsYeats Biography - Poetry FoundationCollected Poems - W. Donn ByrneByrne Biography - J. Fine Art The Faery Harper Oisín

Folktexts: A library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology, page 1 page 1 edited and/or translated by D. Return to: Abducted by Aliens. Bald Stories: Folktales about Hairless Men. Cain and Abel. Death of a Child: Folktales about Excessive MourningThe Parable of the Mustard Seed (A Buddhist parable). East of the Sun and West of the Moon. Fairies' Hope for Christian Salvation. Gambara and the Longbeards (Langobards). Hittite/Hurrian Mythology The Hurrians occupied the land between the Hittites and Assyria, having descended from the mountains south of the Caspian Sea. They ruled the kingdom of Mitanni. In the late 15th century B.C. the Hittite empire's beginning is marked by an influx of Hurrian names into the royal family. Tudhalyas I (1420 B.C.) reunited Western Anatolia under Hittite rule, and retook Allepo but lost the Black Sea coast to the Kaska tribes. The Hittites were a patriarchal, highly agricultural society. You will notice that many of the names carry an optional 's' as a suffix, which comes from the nominative case ending for Hittite. Alalu(s) He was the king in heaven in olden days and Anus was the first among the gods. Anu(s) (Akkadian in origin) While Alalus was king in heaven, Anus was more powerful. Kumarbi(s) - 'the father of all gods' according to the Hurrians. He is sometimes equated with Enlil and Dagan. During a plot to overthrow the Storm-god, he lay with a Rock as if it were a woman. Imbaluris Mukisanus

Family tree of the Greek gods Key: The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font. See also List of Greek mythological figures Notes External links Media related to Family trees of Greek mythology at Wikimedia Commons Germanic Mythology: Texts, Translations, Scholarship Germanic mythology and religion Germanic paganism refers to the theology and religious practices of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until their Christianization during the Medieval period. It has been described as being "a system of interlocking and closely interrelated religious worldviews and practices rather than as one indivisible religion" and as such consisted of "individual worshippers, family traditions and regional cults within a broadly consistent framework".[1] Germanic paganism took various forms in different areas of the Germanic world. The best documented version was that of 10th and 11th century Norse religion, although other information can be found from Anglo-Saxon and Continental Germanic sources. Scattered references are also found in the earliest writings of other Germanic peoples and Roman descriptions. Germanic paganism was polytheistic, with similarities to other Indo-European religions. History[edit] Pre-Migration Period[edit] Caesar[edit] Tacitus[edit] Migration Period[edit] Viking age[edit]

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