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Rethinking Homework

Rethinking Homework
January/February 2007 Rethinking Homework By Alfie Kohn After spending most of the day in school, children are typically given additional assignments to be completed at home. This is a rather curious fact when you stop to think about it, but not as curious as the fact that few people ever stop to think about it. It becomes even more curious, for that matter, in light of three other facts: 1. 2. 3. It’s not as though most teachers decide now and then that a certain lesson really ought to continue after school is over because meaningful learning is so likely to result from such an assignment that it warrants the intrusion on family time. I’ve heard from countless people across the country about the frustration they feel over homework. What parents and teachers need is support from administrators who are willing to challenge the conventional wisdom. So what’s a thoughtful principal to do? 1. 2. 3. Quantity, however, is not the only issue that needs to be addressed. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Related:  Team No Homework

connect with nature 15 Steps to Cultivate Lifelong Learning “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeing with new eyes.” – Marcel Proust“I don’t think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.” – Abraham Lincoln“I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” – Mark Twain Assuming the public school system hasn’t crushed your soul, learning is a great activity. It expands your viewpoint. But in a busy world, it can often be hard to fit in time to learn anything that isn’t essential. Here are some tips for installing the habit of lifelong learning:1) Always have a book. It doesn’t matter if it takes you a year or a week to read a book. We all have to-do lists. Start spending more time with people who think. Albert Einstein once said, “Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.” Skill based learning is useless if it isn’t applied. You learn what you teach. Some forms of learning are easy to digest, but often lack substance.

The Case Against Homework More than ever, it seems as though being a modern parent means wrestling with thorny social, tech and school issues. For instance, should kids be saddled with hours of after-school assignments? That depends on your point of view, and we want to know yours. iStockphoto When kids are younger, homework is rarely an issue—a worksheet or two, spelling lists, 20 minutes of reading. In other words, nothing too taxing. According to education expert Alfie Kohn, they should. —The editors The Case Against Homework By Alfie Kohn After spending all day in school, our children are forced to begin a second shift, with more academic assignments to be completed at home. Instead of assuming that homework should be a given, or that it allegedly benefits children, I've spent the last few years reviewing the available research and talking to parents, teachers and students. The pain is obvious to kids but isn't always taken seriously by adults. We parents, meanwhile, turn into nags. Do you agree or disagree?

10 Great Classroom Icebreakers 1. Self-Portrait. Have your students draw themselves. After they have done this, collect the papers and hang them up for the whole class to see. Now have students try to guess who the artists was for each picture. 2. At the beginning of the year, write a short letter about yourself as the teacher. 3. Give each student an index card. 4. Have the students get into a circle. 5. Pass around a sheet of paper and some pens. 6. Call out any month of the year and have all students born in that month come up to the front of the room. 7. Have the students draw pictures about what they like to do, what their favorite foods are, and what is their favorite subject in school. 8. Don't forget about this old time favorite part of class. 9. Have students write three things about themselves on a piece of paper. 10. Line up the students in two lines facing each other.

Study Finds Too Much Homework Bad for Students November 16, 2012 When it comes to kids and homework, more isn't necessarily better, according to a new study out of the University of Virginia. 'When Is Homework Worth the Time' looks at student achievements in comparison to time spent on homework. Researchers said the findings were surprising. "The more time students spend on homework, it's not clear that they are getting better grades or better test scores," said Robert Tai, an associate professor with the Curry School of Education at UVa. Tai and two co-authors looked at transcripts and data for more than 18,000 tenth grade students nationwide. "What we are concerned with is that homework is just being assigned rather than being used to integrate what's going on in the classroom," said Tai. The study isn't suggesting all homework is bad, especially when it comes to math. Tai says the study is a wake up call for educators. The study points to factors like class participation and attendance as better indicators of students performance.

Educational games Homework Lady WATCH: 6 Insanely Popular TED Talks to Make 2014 the Best Year of Your Life | TEDTalks Posted: Updated: To kick off the new year, TEDWeekends is proud to present a compilation of six insanely popular TED talks from the past year. These talks inspired a tremendous amount of engagement from our community, and each one provides valuable insight that will help you get the most out of life in 2014. We thought this would be the perfect way to say "Thank You" to our thoughtful, curious and inspired readers and bloggers who have helped make this program such a success. Angela Lee Duckworth: This will be the key to your success this year Alexander Tsiaras: This will make you appreciate the wonder of life this year Amy Cuddy: This is why your body language will matter this year David Pogue: This is how to save time and make room for what really matters this year David Gallo: This will force you to explore more this year Jane McGonigal: This will help you play more.. and change the world this year Ideas are not set in stone.

Homework on shoulders Ten Reasons to Get Rid of Homework (and Five Alternatives) 1. Young Children Are Busy: If a child cannot learn what needs to be learned in a six hour day, we are expecting too much of a child. We are creating a jam-packed hurried day without a chance to play, reflect and interact. Adding hours to an already busy day is absurd. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.The Wrong Focus: Homework is precisely that: work at home.

Too much testing, The Truth About Homework September 6, 2006 The Truth About Homework Needless Assignments Persist Because of Widespread Misconceptions About Learning By Alfie Kohn Para leer este artículo en Español, haga clic aquí. There’s something perversely fascinating about educational policies that are clearly at odds with the available data. The dimensions of that last disparity weren’t clear to me until I began sifting through the research for a new book. In high school, some studies do find a correlation between homework and test scores (or grades), but it’s usually fairly small and it has a tendency to disappear when more sophisticated statistical controls are applied. The results of national and international exams raise further doubts. Finally, there isn’t a shred of evidence to support the widely accepted assumption that homework yields nonacademic benefits for students of any age. Sandra Hofferth of the University of Maryland, one of the authors of that study, has just released an update based on 2002 data.

kid overwhelmed by homework

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