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The Interactive Raven

The Interactive Raven
Related:  Horror and E.A. Poe

Modeling Reading and Analysis Processes with the Works of Edgar Allan Poe ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Materials and Technology Student Interactives Printouts Websites Preparation "Treehouse of Horror." (1990). back to top Grades 1 – 12 | Student Interactive | Organizing & Summarizing Plot Diagram The Plot Diagram is an organizational tool focusing on a pyramid or triangular shape, which is used to map the events in a story. Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Organizing & Summarizing Venn Diagram Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Writing & Publishing Prose Printing Press

A Directed Listening-Thinking Activity for "The Tell-Tale Heart" ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session 1 Session 2 Sessions 3 and 4 Session 5 Student Assessment/Reflections Students will Improve their listening comprehension and prediction skills by participating in a Directed Listening–Thinking Activity (DLTA)Respond to literature read in class by either writing an acrostic poem or creating a comic stripPractice strong and effective writing as assessed by the 6 + 1 Trait® Writing model back to top Session 1 Session 2 Sessions 3 and 4 Session 5

Gothic Qualities in the Works of Poe Elements of the Gothic Novel Robert Harris Version Date: June 15, 2015 The gothic novel was invented almost single-handedly by Horace Walpole, whose The Castle of Otranto (1764) contains essentially all the elements that constitute the genre. Walpole's novel was imitated not only in the eighteenth century and not only in the novel form, but it has influenced the novel, the short story, poetry, and even film making up to the present day. Gothic elements include the following: 1. Setting in a castle. The castle may be near or connected to caves, which lend their own haunting flavor with their darkness, uneven floors, branchings, claustrophobia, and mystery. Translated into the modern novel or filmmaking, the setting might be in an old house or mansion--or even a new house--where unusual camera angles, sustained close ups during movement, and darkness or shadows create the same sense of claustrophobia and entrapment. 2. In modern novels and filmmaking, the inexplicable events are often murders. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1.

Edgar Allan Poe: Two Webquests Applied Communications III » Gothic Lit: Tales of Mystery and the Imagination » Edgar Allan Poe: Two Webquests Edgar Allan Poe: Two Webquests He's the Master of the Macabre, the Father of the Detective Story, and his images haunt pop culture 150 years after his mysterious death. Today you will use the sites below to complete two webquests: one focusing on Poe's epic poem, "The Raven," and one investigating Poe's untimely--and mysterious--death. Webquest 1: "The Raven" Visit the first three sites below, entitled "The Interactive Raven," "The Raven: A Study Guide," and "The Raven: Listen and Read." Webquest 2: Poe's Mysterious Death Visit "Knowing Poe" and click to launch the interactive quest entitled, "It'll Be the Death of Me..." The Raven (M4A 6.44 MB)Click here for an audio recording of "The Raven." Poe Webquests (DOC 33 KB)Click here for a copy of today's webquests.

Edgar Allan Poe Webquest and Background written by: Lenzi Hart • edited by: SForsyth • updated: 8/31/2014 Using the website "Poe Museum" students will read and discover facts about the author of "The Tell-Tale Heart," the mysterious but talented Edgar Allan Poe. Getting to Meet Mr. What Killed Edgar Allan Poe? A WebQuest To fully understand the mystery of Poe’s death, you must get a sense of his life and work. Two members of your group will research Poe’s life. The other members of the group will analyze works by Poe. 1. Explore the following sites to research Poe’s life: Be sure to read the following website: Poe’s Problematic Biography. Create a timeline of the most important and interesting details of his life. This timeline and paragraph will be turned at the completion of the project. 2. The Cask of Amontillado Summary and Analysis for “Cask” The Masque of the Red Death Summary and Analysis for “Masque” The Oval Portrait Summary and Analysis for “Portrait” Morella Study Guide for “Morella” Then read the following poem: Annabel Lee After reading, answer the following in complete sentences: What is the tone of the story you chose?

Teacher’s Page | Investigating Poe Carmen Lacherza, Fall 2014 Abstract Edgar Allan Poe has one of the most unique styles in all of American Literature, and he has influenced generations of writers. Performance Objectives Students will use the Internet to research literary criticism. Students will compare complex texts to create a better understanding. Students will create a well-developed argument with a clear thesis. Outcomes Students will understand how Poe uses various literary devices to create meaning. Students will be able to interpret and compare themes, motifs, and symbols. Students will understand how comparing art can help generate meaning. Scaffolding Knowledge Essential Questions: How does comparing art reveal previously unknown truths about that art? How does one’s perspective shape how one creates meaning? How does one form a logical argument? Multiple Intelligences Mind Styles Standards Addressed CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Death Theories | Poe's Life | Edgar Allan Poe Museum On October 3, 1849, Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass received the following note: Baltimore City, Oct. 3, 1849 Dear Sir, There is a gentleman, rather the worse for wear, at Ryan's 4th ward polls, who goes under the cognomen of Edgar A. Poe, and who appears in great distress, & he says he is acquainted with you, he is in need of immediate assistance. Yours, in haste, JOS. This is the first verifiable evidence available of Poe's whereabouts since departing Richmond in the early morning of September 27. In the early morning hours of October 7, Poe calmly breathed a simple prayer, "Lord, help my poor soul," and died.

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