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Edible Weeds

Edible Weeds
About Us | Sitemap | Resources All information, blogs and web content contained in this website is Copyright © EdibleWildFood.com 2011. All photography, unless otherwise stated was taken by Karen Stephenson. All photographs are Copyright © EdibleWildFood.com 2011. Design by Free CSS Templates. About Us | Sitemap All information, blogs and web content contained in this website is Copyright © EdibleWildFood.com 2011.

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Edible Flowers About Us | Sitemap | Resources All information, blogs and web content contained in this website is Copyright © EdibleWildFood.com 2011. All photography, unless otherwise stated was taken by Karen Stephenson. Burdock: Pictures, Flowers, Leaves and Identification Arctium lappa Recognized mainly for its burrs, burdock is an interesting biennial plant because it consists primarily of carbohydrates, volatile oils, plant sterols, tannins, and fatty oils. Researchers aren't sure which active ingredients in burdock root are responsible for its healing properties, but this plant may have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. In fact, recent studies show that burdock contains phenolic acids, quercetin and luteolin - all are powerful antioxidants. Burdock, in its first year has no stem and grows only as a basal rosette of leaves that stays close to the ground the first year and the beginning of the second. Fields of Nutrition has medicinal benefits and vitamin/mineral content of Burdock (click here).

Food Foraging: Find and Enjoy Wild Edible Plants We owe a lasting debt of gratitude to the desperate soul who “discovered” the oyster or stewed that first possum. In the early, hit-or-miss days of foraging, our ancestors learned the hard way about the laxative properties of the senna plant, and to eat only the stems of rhubarb and not the poisonous leaves. Through trial and the occasional fatal error, we sorted the edible from the inedible, the useful from the harmful. After World War II, when American agriculture was fully conquered by industry and supermarkets full of frozen foods popped up across the land — yes, like weeds — foraging came to be regarded as uncouth, probably unhealthy and certainly out of step with modern times.

Healthy herbs nutrition facts and the health benefits of herbs Healthy herbs have long held an important place in our wellness. Prized since ancient times, and today we even more depend on them to purify our body, mind, and soul! Of course, we all use herbal parts in our daily lives, one way or the other, whether for their fragrance, for their healing power, or in lovely recipes. Herbal benefits are many; be it for spiritual reasons or to spice up your taste buds, or as a home remedy for ailments like cold, or sore throat... herbs are handy for each need!

Dandelion Greens – The Perfect Spring Survival Food With Spring finally here in New England, not only are we are enjoying a taste of warmer weather but the first shoots fresh, tasty, wild-edibles as well. One of my favorite wild edibles during the early Spring happens to be the bane of all lawn owners: The Common Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). This article details how to identify and prepare this commonplace but excellent tasting and nutritious wild plant — knowledge that is an excellent addition to your survival info store. How to Identify Dandelion Dandelion is a perennial, herbaceous plant with long, lance-shaped leaves.

#YesAllWomen Should Read These Books—and Men Should Too Told only not to “burn the house down,” a Maryland scientist invented a revolutionary pancreatic-cancer detection test in his parents’ basement, and he has already won hundreds of thousands of dollars in prizes. He’ll graduate from high school next year. A Washington, D.C., athlete has gone from homeless to the brink of pro tennis stardom but is too young to drive himself to matches. Family Medicine Chest: Mullein The family medicine chest will be an ongoing series on the fourth Thursday of each month. This month, As a request, I’ll be writing about mullein. Each month, I open up my home and teach a Herbal Study Group. We read about the particular herb, taste it fresh and dried, make infusions and teas to drink and do various other exercises to learn about it. The following is my hand out for Mullein.

How to Eat Dandelion Flowers This is a follow-up article to the Dandelion Greens – The Perfect Spring Survival Food article I recently wrote. If you’ve already tried preparing the dandelion greens from the prior article than you know how delicious this wild plant can be. In this article I wanted to quickly present you with another pair of delicious recipes using a different part of this common every-day plant: the flowers. Ray Mears Outdoor Survival Handbook Further Information Ray Mears Outdoor Survival Handbook was first published in 1992. Due to huge public demand it was reprinted in 2001, and remains a bestseller. When it was originally published, it was the first comprehensive guide based solely on bushcraft and survival tips.

Three Herbs: Nettles, Horsetail and Mullein P O Box 25, Waldron, WA 98297-0025 Articles | 2014 Workshops | Island Herbs Order Form (pdf) | Contact Ryan Certain aspects of each herb will be presented based on personal experience with no intent to be encyclopedic. Wild Edibles: How to Eat Common Milkweed Disclaimer: Eating certain wild plants can be deadly!! Be certain to consult a professional (or a really good field guide) in order to positively identify this plant before trying this for yourself. The owners of this site will not be held responsible for any lapses in judgment or stupidity when handling or consuming wild plants. Milkweed is one of those plants that I have fond memories for. As a young boy I used to love opening the late summer seed pods to feel the silky soft down inside and watch the wind catch it as I would toss one after the other in the air.

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