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Top 10 Clever Google Search Tricks

Top 10 Clever Google Search Tricks
uIf you really like a web site but its search tool isn't very good, fret not—Google almost always does a better job, and you can use it to search that site with a simple operator. For example, if you want to find an old Lifehacker article, just type site:lifehacker.com before your search terms (e.g. site:lifehacker.com hackintosh). The same goes for your favorite forums, blogs, and even web services. In fact, it's actually really good for finding free audiobooks, searching for free stuff without the spam, and more. You no longer need the "site:" part of that for it to work. "lifehacker.com hackintosh" will work, too.

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Top 40 Useful Sites To Learn New Skills The web is a powerful resource that can easily help you learn new skills. You just have to know where to look. Sure, you can use Google, Yahoo, or Bing to search for sites where you can learn new skills , but I figured I’d save you some time. Here are the top 40 sites I have personally used over the last few years when I want to learn something new. Google Ultimate Interface About Google In 1996-1997, Larry Page and Sergey Brin came up with an algorithm to rank web pages, called PageRank. Realizing the potential to improve search engines, they tried and failed to sell the technology to any. So they founded Google, which in an incredibly short period of time has become one of the world’s most powerful companies.

Neuroplasticity: The 10 Fundamentals Of Rewiring Your Brain Neuroplasticity has become a buzzword in psychology and scientific circles, as well as outside of them, promising that you can “re-wire” your brain to improve everything from health and mental wellbeing to quality of life. There’s a lot of conflicting, misleading, and erroneous information out there. So, exactly how does it work? Via: Thawornnurak and Ioan Panaite | Shutterstock What Is Neuroplasticity Just in case you’ve managed to miss all the hype, neuroplasticity is an umbrella term referring to the ability of your brain to reorganize itself, both physically and functionally, throughout your life due to your environment, behavior, thinking, and emotions.

Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age Our current technological trajectory promises unfathomable, roller-coaster innovation with no braking system. While the ride is exciting, it moves so quickly that we typically don't have time to think about the possible unintended consequences that might accompany it. The result is that we find ourselves unable to effectively respond to hot-button issues like cyberbullying and sexting because they seem to come out of nowhere. Our challenge is to find ways to teach our children how to navigate the rapidly moving digital present, consciously and reflectively. 101 Google Tips, Tricks & Hacks Looking for the ultimate tips for Google searching? You've just found the only guide to Google you need. Let's get started:

Search operators - Search Help You can use symbols or words in your search to make your search results more precise. Google Search usually ignores punctuation that isn’t part of a search operator. Don’t put spaces between the symbol or word and your search term. A search for site:nytimes.com will work, but site: nytimes.com won’t. Search social media Put @ in front of a word to search social media. 5 Ways Meditation Will Help You Have Mind-Blowing Sex About Me Emily Fletcher is the founder of Ziva Meditation and the creator of zivaMIND, the world's first online meditation training. Regarded as one of the leading experts in Vedic meditation, companies like Google, Barclays Bank, Viacom, Relativity Media and sweetgreen have all invited her to help up-level company performance through meditation. Emily has had the honor of speaking at Summit Series, Awesomeness Fest, Harvard Business School, The Omega Center, and GATE: The Global Alliance for Transformational Entertainment with Jim Carey and Eckhart Tolle.

Critical Search Skills Students Should Know There is a new digital divide on the horizon. It is not based around who has devices and who does not, but instead the new digital divide will be based around students who know how to effectively find and curate information and those who do not. Helene Blowers has come up with seven ideas about the new digital divide – four of them, the ones I felt related to searching, are listed below. The New Digital Divide

Reinstall Windows and outfit your system with all freeware programs I recently clean installed Windows XP on my laptop, and this meant that I had to re-install all the essential software that I use. It also presented an opportunity to write a posting about how you can outfit your computer with all the essential (and non-essential) software you need using strictly 100% freeware and/or open source titles.This posting could have been titled any of the following: Pre-installation: before reformatting my hard drive, I used the following programs: Installation: re-installed Windows XP on the re-formatted primary partition. Used the CD that came with my laptop to install all the proper drivers without hitch. Unsafe Search While Google and Yahoo allow you to filter pornography and explicit sexual content from your search results using their "SafeSearch" feature, they do not provide a means to search exclusively for such adult material. It's a shame when someone searching for pornographic material related to, say, llamas, is forced to slog though many pages of perfectly innocuous llama sites before finally hitting upon the llama porn he was looking for. And very few people who do a Google search for "nice tits" want to find a site like this one. Use this form to conduct an "unsafe search."

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore.

How To Copy a DVD with VLC 1.0 VLC 1.0 has gotten several cool new features, one of which is the ability to record what is playing in the screen. Here we will take a look at how easy it is to record a DVD or other video formats using VLC. Want to rip the DVD instead of recording? Musings about librarianship: 6 common misconceptions when doing advanced Google Searching As librarians we are often called upon to teach not just library databases but also Google and Google Scholar. Unlike teaching other search tools, teaching Google is often tricky because unlike library databases where we can have insider access through our friendly product support representative as librarians we have no more or no less insight into Google which is legendary for being secretive. Still, given that Google has become synonymous with search we should be decently good at teaching it. I've noticed though, often when people teach Google, particularly advanced searching of Google, they fall prey to 2 main types of errors. The first type of error involved not keeping up to date and given the rapid speed that Google changes, we often end up teaching things that no longer work.

A little more human “There’s this glaring absence of user experience in law. Whether it’s the layperson or the seasoned lawyer, so many people are miserable in law and no one is thinking about the actual experience or the human part of it.” Margaret Hagen Margaret Hagan is a fellow at Stanford Law’s Center on the Legal Profession and a lecturer at Stanford Institute of Design (the d.school). She’s also founder of the Open Law Lab, “a movement to make the law more accessible, more usable, and more engaging.” It’s a gorgeous day in Mountain View and we’re meeting to talk about her work in humanizing the legal experience through design.

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