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How to Build a Happier Brain

How to Build a Happier Brain
There is a motif, in fiction and in life, of people having wonderful things happen to them, but still ending up unhappy. We can adapt to anything, it seems—you can get your dream job, marry a wonderful human, finally get 1 million dollars or Twitter followers—eventually we acclimate and find new things to complain about. If you want to look at it on a micro level, take an average day. You go to work; make some money; eat some food; interact with friends, family or co-workers; go home; and watch some TV. Nothing particularly bad happens, but you still can’t shake a feeling of stress, or worry, or inadequacy, or loneliness. According to Dr. I spoke with Hanson about this practice, which he calls “taking in the good,” and how evolution optimized our brains for survival, but not necessarily happiness. “Taking in the good” is the central idea of your book. The simple idea is that we we all want to have good things inside ourselves: happiness, resilience, love, confidence, and so forth.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/10/how-to-build-a-happier-brain/280752/

Related:  Mindpsychology

Has David Birnbaum solved the mystery of existence? In the summer of 2012, a number of philosophers at British and American universities received a bulky, unmarked package in the post. It contained a 560-page book, written in English but with the Latin title Summa Metaphysica, by an amateur whose name they didn't recognise: David Birnbaum. It isn't unusual for philosophy departments to get mail from cranks, convinced they have solved the riddle of existence, but they usually send stapled print-outs, or handwritten letters; Summa Metaphysica stood out "for its size and its glossiness", says Tim Crane, a professor of philosophy at Cambridge. The book was professionally typeset. It even included endorsements from Claude Lévi-Strauss, the legendary French anthropologist, who described it as "remarkable and profound", and from the Princeton physicist John Wheeler, who once collaborated with Einstein. It would later transpire that 40,000 copies were in circulation, a print run any academic philosopher might kill for.

Positive Psychology Harvard Open Course Cindy Flower Loading... Working... We are losing the art of reading ‘Although we love to argue about books, acquire them, express strong opinions about them, etc, etc, more than ever we seem to be losing the knack of reading them.’ Photograph: CBW /Alamy It has already been quite a year for lovers of book-blah. This spring, storm clouds have gathered and then broken over a succession of literary teacups. Does the publishing of gender-specific books demean our children? Should one build an English A-level around Russell Brand interview excerpts and tweets from Caitlin Moran?

Can we get our heads around consciousness? – Michael Hanlon Over there is a bird, in silhouette, standing on a chimney top on the house opposite. It is evening; the sun set about an hour ago and now the sky is an angry, pink-grey, the blatting rain of an hour ago threatening to return. The bird, a crow, is proud (I anthropomorphise). Brain and Behavior, Wendy Suzuki, NYU Upload www.psychologyconcepts.com Psychology Videos Loading...

Tavi Forever From tween blogger to feminist editrix to Broadway actor, Tavi Gevinson is embarking on her next project: being a grown-up. Tavi Gevinson is a list-maker. It’s one part of her talent for self-help, a process she might refer to as “giving myself therapy” or “being my own best friend.” To understand how Gevinson has maintained the integrity of what she calls “a core me,” begin with her lists. Quiz: Find Your Happy Place : NPR Ed All this week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning. Play is a part of healthy development, an integral ingredient in learning, a nostalgic pastime. It's good for your body and your brain. There's something inherently youthful about play, of course, but it's not just kid stuff. Play has a vital role in adult life as well. But in our all-too-purposeful adult world, it's easy to skip your playtime.

30 Journaling Prompts for Self-Reflection and Self-Discovery I often include different journal prompts on Weightless because I think it’s key to continually maintain a dialogue with ourselves. It’s part of building a healthy relationship, or rather a friendship, with yourself. As Eleanor Roosevelt said, “Friendship with oneself is all important, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else in the world.” Here are 30 prompts, questions and ideas to explore in your journal to get to know yourself better. My favorite way to spend the day is…If I could talk to my teenage self, the one thing I would say is…The two moments I’ll never forget in my life are… Describe them in great detail, and what makes them so unforgettable.Make a list of 30 things that make you smile.“Write about a moment experienced through your body.

Masters of Love - Emily Esfahani Smith Every day in June, the most popular wedding month of the year, about 13,000 American couples will say “I do,” committing to a lifelong relationship that will be full of friendship, joy, and love that will carry them forward to their final days on this earth. Except, of course, it doesn’t work out that way for most people. The majority of marriages fail, either ending in divorce and separation or devolving into bitterness and dysfunction. Of all the people who get married, only three in ten remain in healthy, happy marriages, as psychologist Ty Tashiro points out in his book The Science of Happily Ever After, which was published earlier this year. Social scientists first started studying marriages by observing them in action in the 1970s in response to a crisis: Married couples were divorcing at unprecedented rates. Psychologist John Gottman was one of those researchers.

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