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Ladies Last: 8 Inventions by Women That Dudes Got Credit For

Ladies Last: 8 Inventions by Women That Dudes Got Credit For
October 15 is Ada Lovelace Day, named for the world's first computer programmer and dedicated to promoting women in STEM—science, technology, engineering, and math. A Victorian-era mathematical genius, Lovelace was the first to describe how computing machines could solve math problems, write new forms of music, and much more, if you gave them instructions in a language they could understand. Of course, over the ensuing 100-plus years, dudes have been lining up to push her out of the picture (more on that below). Lovelace is hardly the only woman to be erased from the history of her own work. (This isn't a complete list, by tragically epic degrees. Rosalind Franklin Wikimedia Commons ​Rosalind Franklin, discovery of the DNA double helix: Watson and Crick's famed article in Nature on the discovery of the DNA double-helix structure, which would win them a Nobel Prize, buries a mention of Rosalind Franklin's role in the footnotes. Ada Lovelace Wikimedia Commons Lise Meitner Wikimedia Commons Related:  Histoire (discipline) : exclusion, théorisation, réhabilitation.Sex and Gender

53 photographies qui témoignent du courage exceptionnel de ces femmes qui ont marqué l’Histoire Les femmes ont été pendant trop longtemps considérées comme le « sexe faible ». Et pourtant certaines d’entre elles ont prouvé à juste titre qu’elles avaient autant de force, d’engagement, de volonté et de courage que les hommes. Souvent méconnues, ces femmes ont fait l’histoire et ont marqué l’humanité à jamais. Découvrez ces figures féminines qui ont brisé des barrières ! Anna Fisher, une femme américaine astronaute et première mère dans l’espace – 1984 Une Arménienne de 106 ans qui protège sa maison avec un AK-47 – 1990 Amelia Earhart, première femme-pilote à avoir traversé l’océan Atlantique – 1928 Des femmes bénévoles qui apprennent à lutter contre les incendies à Pearl Harbor – 1941/1945 Une femme londonienne qui boit une tasse de thé après la destruction de sa maison par les bombardements allemands – 1940 La capitaine Nieves Fernandez montre à un soldat américain comment elle a tué les occupants japonais – 1944 Une femme travaillant sur un avion de chasse – 1944 Leola N.

Thorium-Fueled Automobile Engine Needs Refueling Once a Century By: David Russell Schilling | October 28th, 2013 Thorium Concept Car - Image Courtesy www.greenpacks.com There are now over one billion cars traveling roads around the world directly and indirectly costing trillions of dollars in material resources, time and noxious emissions. Laser Power Systems (LPS) from Connecticut, USA, is developing a new method of automotive propulsion with one of the most dense materials known in nature: thorium. Cadillac World Thorium Fuel Concept (Image Courtesy www.cutedesign.com) Current models of the engine weigh 500 pounds, easily fitting into the engine area of a conventionally-designed vehicle. The idea of using thorium is not new. According to Robert Hargraves, “low or non-CO2 emitting energy sources must be cheaper than coal or will ultimately fail to displace fossil fuels.” Thorium may also be the answer to the world’s nuclear energy conundrum and Wikipedia provides some of its advantages: Thanks for reading! David Schilling

The First Legal Abortionists Tell Their Stories -- The Cut “It was organized like an underground railroad. I didn’t have direct contact with the patients until their appointments. The women would contact a member of the clergy who was one of the referral group. The priests set up the appointments. “The women came by car, by bus, and by train. “I basically taught myself how to do abortions. Dr. “When I was 20 I had an illegal abortion in New York City. “I provided my first abortion in the late '60s; 1968 was the year 100,000 teens came to San Francisco with flowers in their hair. “The year before, abortion law had been liberalized in California. “I performed the abortions in the hospital, which was legally mandated at the time. “When Roe passed, it was just fantastic. “After Roe, I didn’t think about the backlash. Dr. “Abortion in the U.S. has become a victim of its own success; an entire generation of Americans have grown up without seeing or understanding what the dark days of before Roe were like. Dr. “I wanted to be an epidemiologist. Dr.

Cotton gin "The First Cotton Gin", an engraving from Harper's Magazine, 1869. This carving depicts a roller gin, which preceded Eli Whitney's invention.[1] A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, allowing for much greater productivity than manual cotton separation.[2] The fibers are processed into clothing or other cotton goods, and any undamaged seeds may be used to grow more cotton or to produce cottonseed oil and meal. Although simple handheld roller gins have been used in India and other countries since at least 500 AD,[3] the first modern mechanical cotton gin was created by American inventor Eli Whitney in 1793, and patented in 1794. It used a combination of a wire screen and small wire hooks to pull the cotton through, while brushes continuously removed the loose cotton lint to prevent jams. History Rationale Early cotton gins Between the 12th and 14th centuries, dual-roller gins appeared in India and China. Eli Whitney's patent References

How Women Are Changing The World, Shown In Gorgeous Illustrations How Women Are Changing The World, Shown In Gorgeous Illustrations The Huffington Post | By Nina Bahadur Posted: Updated: Peruvian artist María María Acha-Kutscher wants to make women's participation in social movements more visible -- and her gorgeous illustrations do just that. (Story continues below.) Acha-Kutscher started her "Indignadas" project in 2012, paying homage to woman activists worldwide. According to her website, the artist hopes that her work will "make women's efforts more visible and place women at the center of these social struggles." "I hope this series connects especially with young people, with the 'new feminism,'" Acha-Kutscher told The Huffington Post. Check out more inspiring images below. HuffPostWomen See On Around the Web Indignadas - MARÍA MARÍA ACHA-KUTSCHER Indignadas | Facebook 14 Powerful Images Remind the World That Women Can Change the Course of ... Info - MARÍA MARÍA ACHA-KUTSCHER Peru's Feminist Activist-Artist: María María Acha-Kutscher · Global ...

Australian Researchers Create 3D Interior Map of Italy's Leaning Tower of Pisa Australian researchers have created a 3D interior map of Italy's Leaning Tower of Pisa. The researchers used Zebedee, a handheld 3D mapping system developed by CSIRO, Australia's national science agency. Zebedee can scan an environment as the operator walks through it. Zebedee's design features a laser scanner mounted on a spring, which provides a lightweight solution for ensuring a wide scanning field of view. The spring converts the natural motions of the operator into a sweeping motion of the scanner. Dr. Dr. Photos: CSIRO

How Doctors Take Women's Pain Less Seriously Early on a Wednesday morning, I heard an anguished cry—then silence. I rushed into the bedroom and watched my wife, Rachel, stumble from the bathroom, doubled over, hugging herself in pain. “Something’s wrong,” she gasped. This scared me. So when I saw Rachel collapse on our bed, her hands grasping and ungrasping like an infant’s, I called the ambulance. I don’t know how long it took for the ambulance to reach us that Wednesday morning. I didn’t know our wait was just beginning. I buzzed the EMTs into our apartment. “Eleven,” Rachel croaked. As we loaded into the ambulance, here’s what we didn’t know: Rachel had an ovarian cyst, a fairly common thing. “Ovarian torsion represents a true surgical emergency,” says an article in the medical journal Case Reports in Emergency Medicine. There is nothing like witnessing a loved one in deadly agony. And there we stopped. Emergency-room patients are supposed to be immediately assessed and treated according to the urgency of their condition.

Happy Ada Lovelace Day! | Belle Jar The ‘Enchantress of Numbers’ herself Heard of Ada Lovelace? Of the dozen or more people I’ve quizzed on this over the past few days, only two knew the name and neither could say exactly who she was or what she was famous for. Upon being informed that she is widely considered to be the world’s first computer programmer, all were surprised… Here follows a quick crib sheet on the lady herself: Augusta Ada King (née Byron), born in 1815, was actually the daughter of Lord Byron, although she never knew him as he died when she was eight months old. Young Ada was always fascinated by machines and adored mathematics, science and logic and was mentored by Mary Sommerville, another brilliant female mathematician. This is only the briefest of brief delves into the life of a fascinating figure who continues to inspire women and girls in the fields of maths and science to this day. Happy Ada Lovelace Day, one and all! Like this: Like Loading...

If Disney Princesses Were Historically Accurate 'All Clear' UV Light Bottle Purifies Water in 60 Seconds On Friday afternoon, I plugged my water bottle into a laptop USB port for a charge. Saturday found me in the woods of Wisconsin, dipping the bottle into a lake then pressing a button to purify its contents for a drink. The $99 bottle, called the All Clear UV Microbiological Water Purifier, is made by CamelBak. It uses UV light to render microbes harmless, letting you grab a drink almost anywhere. Specifically, the UV light “destroys microbe DNA,” as CamelBak puts it. Bacteria, water-borne viruses, and protozoan cysts, including the troublesome cryptosporidium breed, are rendered benign by the light. The full All Clear kit This technology is not new. In the outdoors industry, Hydro-Photon has sold its UV-based SteriPEN product for more than 10 years. CamelBak’s All Clear is a similar concept but with a different design. The goal with All Clear is simple and quick purification. Digital countdown on UV cap That’s it. The system is slick. Also, not all water works in the system.

Jennifer Lawrence has a point. Famous quotes, the way a woman would have to say them during a meeting. By Joby Warrick October 8, 2015 A few feet below this prairie town lies one of North America’s biggest coal deposits, a 100-foot-thick slab of brittle black rock spanning an area the size of Rhode Island — nearly all of it owned by the U.S. taxpayer. Just a dozen nearby mines, scattered across a valley known as the Powder River Basin, contain enough coal to meet the country’s electricity needs for decades. The Obama administration is seeking to curb the United States’ appetite for the basin’s coal, which scientists say must remain mostly in the ground to prevent a disastrous warming of the planet. Each shipment highlights what critics describe as a hypocrisy underlying U.S. climate policy: While boasting of pollution cuts at home, the United States is facilitating the sale of large quantities of government-owned coal abroad. But with domestic demand shrinking, mining firms are looking to sell more coal abroad. “It erases everything the Obama administration is trying to do,” said James R.

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