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The Art of “Creative Sleep”: Stephen King on Writing and Wakeful Dreaming

The Art of “Creative Sleep”: Stephen King on Writing and Wakeful Dreaming
by Maria Popova “In both writing and sleeping, we learn to be physically still at the same time we are encouraging our minds to unlock from the humdrum rational thinking of our daytime lives.” “Sleep is the greatest creative aphrodisiac,” a wise woman once said. Indeed, we already know that dreaming regulates our negative emotions and “positive constructive daydreaming” enhances our creativity, while a misaligned sleep cycle is enormously mentally crippling. But can a sleep-like state in waking life, aside from lucid dreaming, actually enrich and empower our creative capacity? According to Stephen King, yes: In On Writing: A Memoir on the Craft (public library), which also gave us his case against adverbs, the celebrated novelist explores the similarity between writing and dreaming. Like your bedroom, your writing room should be private, a place where you go to dream. King likens the creative process to a kind of wakeful dream state. Donating = Loving Share on Tumblr

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/10/14/stephen-king-on-writing-and-creative-sleep/

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