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Begin programming: build your first mobile game — University of Reading

Begin programming: build your first mobile game — University of Reading
Learn the basics of Java programming by developing a simple mobile game that you can run on your computer, Android phone, or tablet. Programming is everywhere: in dishwashers, cars and even space shuttles. This course will help you to understand how programs work and guide you through creating your own computer program – a mobile game. Whether you’re a complete newcomer to programming, or have some basic skills, this course provides a challenging but fun way to start programming in Java. Over seven weeks we will introduce the basic constructs that are used in many programming languages and help you to put this knowledge into practice by changing the game code we have provided. You’ll have the freedom to create a game that’s unique to you, with support from the community and educators if you get stuck. At the end of the course you’ll have a complete game that can be played on an Android phone or tablet, or even your computer.

12 Principles Of Mobile Learning 12 Principles Of Mobile Learning by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated and republished from a 2012 post Mobile Learning is about self-actuated personalization. As learning practices and technology tools change, mobile learning itself will continue to evolve. It is only within these communities that the native context of each learner can be fully understood. 1. A mobile learning environment is about access to content, peers, experts, portfolio artifacts, credible sources, and previous thinking on relevant topics. 2. As mobile learning is a blend of the digital and physical, diverse metrics (i.e., measures) of understanding and “performance of knowledge” will be available. 3. The cloud is the enabler of “smart” mobility. 4. Transparency is the natural byproduct of connectivity, mobility, and collaboration. 5. Play is one of the primary characteristics of authentic, progressive learning, both a cause and effect of an engaged mind. 6. 7. 8. With mobility comes diversity. 9. 10.

27 Ways to Learn to Program Online Whether you are looking to switch careers and become a full-time programmer, want to try to build a website or app on the side, or are just looking to round out your skill set, learning to code has certainly been something a lot of people have started to do lately. And while being a programmer might not be for everyone, there is a lot to be said about gaining a better, more educated view of how all those pixels get moved around all those screens. Before we delve into our list of learning resources sites, we wanted to share some advice from Marissa Louie, a self-taught product designer for Ness Computing. Louie said that once you attain the basic skills, the best thing to do is just jump in and try to give yourself custom tasks, and build experience on your own through lots of trial and error. So with that sound advice in mind, let’s move to our in-no-particular-order list of learning resources (if you have more suggestions, PLEASE list them in the comments!). 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

UNESCO Mobile Learning Publications UNESCO Mobile Learning Publications Today there are over six billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide, and for every one person who accesses the internet from a computer two do so from a mobile device. Given the ubiquity and rapidly expanding functionality of mobile technologies, UNESCO is enthusiastic about their potential to improve and facilitate learning, particularly in communities where educational opportunities are scarce. This Working Paper Series scans the globe to illuminate the ways in which mobile technologies can be used to support the United Nations Education for All Goals; respond to the challenges of particular educational contexts; supplement and enrich formal schooling; and make learning more accessible, equitable, personalized and flexible for students everywhere. UNESCO Policy Guidelines for Mobile Learning Illustrative Initiatives and Policy Implications Exploring the Potential of Mobile Technologies to Support Teachers and Improve Practice Mobile Reading Back to top

A University for the Web. Built by an open community It's even more Peer Powered We know learning is more fun with friends. We've kept the best part of the School of Webcraft and made it the core of everything we do to #TeachTheWeb. We work alongside our peers, ask each other for help, and offer expertise to those in need. Mozilla & P2PU Mozilla's mission is to keep the web open, and to work together to enable anyone to take part in building it's future. We support each other. Webmaker's #TeachTheWeb program is part of Mozilla's commitment to help educators and others teach vital web literacy skills.

Mobile Learning Mobile Learning ©UNESCO/NOKIA | ©UNESCO/Pakistan project Today over 6 billion people have access to a connected mobile device and for every one person who accesses the internet from a computer two do so from a mobile device. Mobile technology is changing the way we live and it is beginning to change the way we learn. UNESCO is working to help governments and individuals use mobile devices to advance Education for All Goals; respond to the challenges of particular educational contexts; supplement and enrich formal schooling; and, in general, make learning more accessible, equitable and flexible for students everywhere. What is mobile learning? Mobile learning involves the use of mobile technology, either alone or in combination with other information and communication technology (ICT), to enable learning anytime and anywhere. What work is UNESCO doing in mobile learning? Back to top

Free tutorials on HTML, CSS and PHP - Build your own website - HTML.net Have your say: guidelines for writers and contributors | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional It is not wrong to assume that most development professionals are passionate about their work. Many are also good writers. But for those who need a little help to communicate their passion clearly in writing, this guide may be helpful. Practically, our content is usually about 800 words long. Because pieces are written for a professional audience - not for the general public - the aim is that they share experiences, lessons learned, best practice or practical tips. Alternatively, you can file a field post - and article about your personal experiences a development professional or humanitarian in the field. How to develop your story First, decide what you want to write about (eg: aid flows from the US). You may have a rough idea (American aid isn't having the impact it should have – why?). Try to put that in one line (why US aid is not reaching the people who need it most). Once you have gathered facts and opinions, you have your basic material. Keep it simple Good writing is simple writing.

alternatives to codecademy | @myasmine Running my software company from 2009 to 2011 without a development background was challenging to say the least. It is how I became involved with GirlDevelopIt (an organization offers programming classes for women) and why I started LearnRuby101. With this post, my goal is to share the free interactive learn-how-to-code sites I’ve come across that can help you get started. I’ve also gathered the top recommended books on each language from Hacker News. For non-programmers, I would recommend reading this post by Liz Abinante titled “So, you think you want to be a web developer?”. If you decide it’s the path for you, recruit a friend or find an online community to get assistance. For programmers that know one or more languages already, this is a useful list if you want to quickly dive into something new without using a compiler. (Thanks to Owen Winkler for providing suggestions on this post). Learning HTML/CSS Learning JavaScript Learning Python Learning Ruby/Rails Learning Java Learning Git Ruby

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