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OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement

OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement
Summary: This resource provides tips for creating a thesis statement and examples of different types of thesis statements. Contributors:Elyssa Tardiff, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2014-02-10 10:44:43 Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement 1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing: An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience.An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.An argumentative paper makes a claim about a topic and justifies this claim with specific evidence. If you are writing a text that does not fall under these three categories (e.g., a narrative), a thesis statement somewhere in the first paragraph could still be helpful to your reader. 2. 3. 4. Thesis Statement Examples Example of an analytical thesis statement: The paper that follows should: Example of an expository (explanatory) thesis statement:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/545/1/

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