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Abstracts

Abstracts
Summary: This handout discusses how to write good abstracts for reports. It covers informational and descriptive abstracts and gives pointers for success. Contributors:Dana Lynn DriscollLast Edited: 2013-03-12 09:58:07 Types of abstracts There are two types of abstracts: informational and descriptive. Informational abstracts Communicate contents of reportsInclude purpose, methods, scope, results, conclusions, and recommendationsHighlight essential pointsAre short—from a paragraph to a page or two, depending upon the length of the report (10% or less of the report)Allow readers to decide whether they want to read the report Descriptive abstracts Tell what the report containsInclude purpose, methods, scope, but NOT results, conclusions, and recommendationsAre always very short— usually under 100 wordsIntroduce subject to readers, who must then read the report to learn study results Qualities of a good abstract An effective abstract Steps for writing effective report abstracts

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/656/1/

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OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement Summary: This resource provides tips for creating a thesis statement and examples of different types of thesis statements. Contributors:Elyssa Tardiff, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2014-02-10 10:44:43 Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement 1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing: Political economy In the late 19th century, the term economics came to replace political economy, coinciding with the publication of an influential textbook by Alfred Marshall in 1890.[1] Earlier, William Stanley Jevons, a proponent of mathematical methods applied to the subject, advocated economics for brevity and with the hope of the term becoming "the recognised name of a science."[2][3] Etymology[edit]

Academic Writing These OWL resources will help you with the types of writing you may encounter while in college. The OWL resources range from rhetorical approaches for writing, to document organization, to sentence level work, such as clarity. For specific examples of writing assignments, please see our Common Writing Assignments area. The Rhetorical Situation OWL: Paraphrase Exercises Summary: This resource discusses how to paraphrase correctly and accurately. Contributors:Purdue OWLLast Edited: 2014-10-10 08:56:34 Mathematics & Statistics Generalizations of Multidimensional Continued Fractions: Tetrahedron and k-Dimensional Emmanuel Howard Daring The decimal and continued fraction expansions of a number are periodic if and only if the number is rational or a quadratic irrational, respectively. Multidimensional continued fractions aim to replicate this property with different types of irrational numbers, partitioning a triangle to produce a periodic sequence if the coordinates of the point the sequence describes are at worst cubic irrationals in the same number field.

OWL: Subject/Verb Agreement Summary: Ever get "subject/verb agreement" as an error on a paper? This handout will help you understand this common grammar problem. Contributors:Joshua M. Sociotechnical system Sociotechnical systems (STS) in organizational development is an approach to complex organizational work design that recognizes the interaction between people and technology in workplaces. The term also refers to the interaction between society's complex infrastructures and human behaviour. In this sense, society itself, and most of its substructures, are complex sociotechnical systems. Comparing the Book to the Movie Watching a movie after reading the book is a wonderful way to encourage students to think critically about how each medium presented roughly the same information. Here are some questions to ask: Think about the setting of the book. Did the setting in the movie look like you had imagined it (Good ones for this are Harry Potter, Holes, Narnia, and Where the Wild Things Are)? If not, how was it different?

Should PowerPoint be banned from meetings? If you’ve suffered through meetings where colleagues use PowerPoint decks as their autocues for droning ‘presentations,’ you’ll love this development at two leading companies that could be a model for others to emulate. Author and communicator Eric Bergman reports that two CEOs – Jeff Bezos at Amazon and Jeff Weiner at LinkedIn – have eliminated slide-driven presentations from their meetings. In the case of Amazon, the ban on PowerPoint presentations includes a ban on printed decks as well, as Bezos said in an interview with Charlie Rose, a US talk show host and journalist. […] “All of our meetings are structured around six-page memos,” Bezos says, pointing out that this also eliminates bullet points. “When you have to write your ideas out in complete sentences and complete paragraphs, it forces a deeper clarity of thinking.”Bezos believes that PowerPoint is easy for the presenter but difficult for the audience. Are these behaviours workable in other organizations?

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