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OWL Writing Exercises

OWL Writing Exercises
These OWL resources offer information and exercises on how to clarify sentences and specifically discuss sentence clauses, sentence fragments, sentence structure, and subject-verb agreement. Please use the navigation bar on the left or the links below to access the individual exercises. Sentence Clauses: Independent and Dependent Clauses This resource provides exercises on the differences between independent and dependent clauses that you may print. Once you print the exercise, identify and correct the misuse of these clauses. Click the "Go to Answers" link to see the answers for this exercise. Sentence Fragments This resource includes three exercises on fragments of increasing difficulty that ask you to identify and correct sentence fragments. Sentence Structure This exercise in this resource asks you to apply your knowledge about common errors in sentence structure: run-ons, commas splices, and fused sentences. Subject-Verb Agreement

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/5/

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Academic Writing These OWL resources will help you with the types of writing you may encounter while in college. The OWL resources range from rhetorical approaches for writing, to document organization, to sentence level work, such as clarity. For specific examples of writing assignments, please see our Common Writing Assignments area. ESLGold.com - Grammar - Basic sentence structure - ESL English as a Second Language free materials for teaching and study. The best resources to help you learn English online Basic Sentence Structure There are five basic patterns around which most English sentences are built. mshesso:Grammar AA = Avoid Anthropomorphism Do not assign uniquely human qualities to inanimate objects. For instance, results do not think and the literature does not believe.

OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement Summary: This resource provides tips for creating a thesis statement and examples of different types of thesis statements. Contributors:Elyssa Tardiff, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2014-02-10 10:44:43 Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement 1. OWL: Verb Tenses Summary: This handout explains and describes the sequence of verb tenses in English. Contributors:Chris Berry, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth AngeliLast Edited: 2013-09-14 09:29:01 Strictly speaking, in English, only two tenses are marked in the verb alone, present (as in "he sings") and past (as in "he sang"). Other English language tenses, as many as thirty of them, are marked by other words called auxiliaries. Understanding the six basic tenses allows one to re-create much of the reality of time in their writing.

Grammar Basics: Sentence Parts and Sentence Structures The job of grammar is to organize words into sentences, and there are many ways to do that. (Or we could say, Words can be organized into sentences in many different ways.) For this reason, describing how to put a sentence together isn't as easy as explaining how to bake a cake or assemble a model plane. The Six Ways You’re Acting Like a Grad Student (And how that’s killing you on the job market) For the next few months I will be posting the “best of the best” Professor is in blog posts on the job market, for the benefit of all those girding their loins for the 2013-2014 market. Today we have another Special Request post, this one coming from Liz, who asks, “You’re always telling us ‘not to act like graduate students.’ But how do I know when I’m doing it??” Thanks for asking this, Liz. It is an excellent question, especially at the start of the conference and job season.

Writing the Essay Intro and Conclusion Your essay lacks only two paragraphs now: the introduction and the conclusion. These paragraphs will give the reader a point of entry to and a point of exit from your essay. Introduction The introduction should be designed to attract the reader's attention and give her an idea of the essay's focus. Begin with an attention grabber. The attention grabber you use is up to you, but here are some ideas:Startling information This information must be true and verifiable, and it doesn't need to be totally new to your readers. OWL: Paraphrase Exercises Summary: This resource discusses how to paraphrase correctly and accurately. Contributors:Purdue OWLLast Edited: 2016-06-30 09:41:14 Learn to borrow from a source without plagiarizing. For more information on paraphrasing, as well as other ways to integrate sources into your paper, see the Purdue OWL handout Quoting Paraphrasing, and Summarizing.

sentence structure Simple sentences: A simple sentence has only one clause: The children were laughing. John wanted a new bicycle. All the girls are learning English. Tools for Writing: Points of View in Writing There are three different points of view that can be used in writing: first person, second person, and third person. In academic writing, the third person point of view is usually clearer and allows a writer to come across as more credible. Due to this and other reasons, the third person point of view is considered the best in academic writing. First person occurs primarily through the use of the pronoun “I.” This is the point of view used when a writer is writing about himself. There may be times when it is okay to incorporate personal examples into an essay, and if so, the first person will be used.

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