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Kick Start Your Blogging

Kick Start Your Blogging
Skip to content Personal Blogging This series guides you step by step through the process of setting up your own personal or professional educator blog. Refer our class and student blogging series if you want to set up a class blog. Each step provides examples of personal educator blogs so you can check out how they are used by other educators. You can work through the activities in any order and at any time. Sign Up For Free Powered by WordPress | Hosted by Edublogs | Protected by CloudFlare AddThis Sharing Sidebar Share to Facebook , Number of shares20 Share to TwitterShare to LinkedIn , Number of shares Share to EmailMore AddThis Share options , Number of shares24 Hide Show AddThis FollowShare Toggle Dock Share Close AddThisPrivacy Related:  School Blogging

How to Get a Classroom of Kids Blogging in Under 5 Minutes! Kidblog.org is a service designed by teachers for teachers. They have made the process of creating and monitoring a class blog safe and efficient. Sign-ups are fast and simple, making it easy to co-ordinate a whole class of new students. The primary differences between Kidblog and any other free blogging platform is the default class-only privacy level and the superbly easy way of bulk-adding user accounts for students without requiring email addresses and confirmation of invites. Setting up a teacher account The teacher account is a straightforward sign-up: choose a password, add a few details and you’re in. Create a New Class The blog creation is controlled by “classes”. The class name is the blog name, which becomes part of the URL for the class blog too. You’re limited to 200 kids per class, but it’s suggested that if you need more usernames you simply start a new class, add the new users to that and then invite them to the original class. Privacy and Security Add Users Groups For Kids

Blogging With Students Skip to content Blogging With Students This series guides you step by step through the process of class and student blogging. Each step includes links to class blogs being used by educators so you can check out how other educators use their blogs. Many of the examples are from primary grades but the same principles apply regardless of student age including adult learner. The activities can be completed at your own pace and in any order! This series consists of: Sign Up For Free Powered by WordPress | Hosted by Edublogs | Protected by CloudFlare AddThis Sharing Hide Show AddThis FollowShare Toggle Dock Share Close AddThisPrivacy

Blogging for Learning How to Share Key Information Among Your Team Posted by Joshua Zerkel on 20 May 2014 Comment At your business, you keep track of a lot of information. From assets that need to be available company-wide to project documents relevant to only specific teams, Evernote Business ensures that the right people have access to the right information. Share with the whole company: Evernote Business is an ideal place to consolidate information you want everyone in your company to see. Create a shared Business Notebook for “Key Documents,” add your employee handbook, travel and reimbursement policies, tax forms or similar documents, and hit publish. Share with workgroups: Not every bit of information created in your business is meant for company-wide consumption. Ideal for companies. Learn more

Tips and Topics for Student Bloggers Posted by Mrs Kathleen Morris on Thursday, August 2nd 2012 Recently, I wrote two posts about quality student blogs. You can find them here and here. I have also written a guide to setting up student blogs here. A new group of students in my class are almost ready to earn their own blogs. I wanted to compile the tips I offer my students in one document for my new bloggers. Below is a poster with tips for student bloggers. I have also made a document with 20 ideas for blog post topics. Do you have any tips to add to the poster? What other ideas for student blog post topics could you offer?

10 reasons students should blog … and they all come from 12 year olds! 1. I think the blog has turned me into a global learner, who loves to share their learning and opinion. The disadvantage is that sometimes the blog deletes your post. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Like this: Like Loading... Creating a PLN Skip to content Building your PLN Know it or not, you already have some sort of Personal Learning Network or PLN! It could be your colleagues, family, students, friends – whoever! But with the power of the web and online collaboration – a PLN could really grow! This series guides you step by step through the process of building your PLN. You can work through the activities in any order and at any time. Here is our guide to growing your PLN in as little as a couple of weeks! Sign Up For Free Powered by WordPress | Hosted by Edublogs | Protected by CloudFlare AddThis Sharing Sidebar Share to Facebook , Number of shares76 Share to TwitterShare to LinkedIn , Number of shares Share to EmailMore AddThis Share options , Number of shares65 Hide Show AddThis FollowShare Toggle Dock Share Close AddThisPrivacy

Student Blogs: Learning to Write in Digital Spaces  Student blogging is not a project, but a process. We are continuously striving to refine, improve and re-evaluate. As I am meeting with teachers individually, I can’t stress enough the importance of READING other blogs (professional, student, blogs about your hobby, blogs about other interests you have etc.). Andrea Hernandez and I are working on a “spiraling” blogging skills guide for each grade level in order to facilitate skill building connections from one year to the next. Creating the platform and the username and password and teaching the kids to log in is the EASY part. The focus needs to be in using the platform to guide students to : By “translating”, I mean… By “transforming”, I mean…being able to do something that was impossible to do before: write for a global audience. While I understand that “translating” and “substituting” (take a look at the SAMR model) analog, traditional tasks with online digital tasks is part of the process, it is only a step. Like this: Like Loading...

create-and-theme-an-evernote-powered-blog-with-postachio--cms-21063?utm_content=buffer7283b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter Postach.io is a blogging system with a difference. It has one feature in particular which makes it especially interesting: instead of an admin panel you simply create your posts inside Evernote. You can use any Evernote app, which means Postach.io blogging is multi-platform, automatically backed up, and (if you're already an Evernote user) very familiar. In this tutorial we'll be learning how to setup your own Postach.io/Evernote powered blog and how to create a custom theme for it. To begin with, if you don't already have an Evernote account, you'll need to set one up. You'll be taken to a page where you can authorize Postach.io to gain access to your Evernote account. In the next screen enter your name, email address, site the title and the subdomain you'd like for your site, then click the yellow "Create Site" button. After a few seconds your blog setup will be complete and you'll see a success screen with a link you can follow to go to your new site: Adding images is also super easy.

Muzy Offers a Neat Way to Blog With Pictures Muzy is a neat blogging service that offers a neat way to blog with pictures and text. Muzy offers more than two dozen apps for manipulating and displaying your pictures. If you don't have pictures that you want to share you can use the integrated image search to find images to write about and share. When you first visit the Muzy website you'll see a pop-up box asking you to sign-in with a Facebook account. Applications for Education Muzy's integrated image search could be used by students to create a collage of images about a place, person, or event that they're studying. Muzy's T.O.S. requires users to be 13 or older.

7 Reasons Your Students should be Blogging in 2013 One of the best things about blogging in the classroom is that it is a cross-curricular activity that can be used to teach any subject and develop just about any skills, from reading and writing to math, geography and everything in between. If you are still unsure about how blogging can benefit your students, here are seven reasons that might be able to persuade you as a teacher to get on board with blogging in the classroom this year. Blogging motivates students to read and write The best way to get students to read and write is to offer them things that they are interested in reading and writing about – things that relate to them and their peers. Blogging gives students a larger audience As a teacher, it is your duty to grade and critique the work of a student, but getting a second, third or fiftieth opinion never hurts either. Blogging gives students confidence Blogging enables students to create a virtual portfolio Blogging allows teachers to discover a student’s true talents

PLN: Your Personal Learning Network Made Easy | Once a Teacher.... What is a PLN? If I had to define what a ‘Personal Learning Network’ is, I would keep it simple and broad: n. – the entire collection of people with whom you engage and exchange information, usually online. Personal Learning Networks, or PLNs, have been around forever. PLNs have immense value! So, why bother thinking about your PLN? Here are some ways that educators are using their PLNs: - Professional development – learn from content-area specialists - Locate resources for your classroom, such as free websites and software - Get lesson plan ideas from master teachers - Learn about new technology and how to integrate it into your teaching - Find collaborative solutions - Find interesting links to education news Students can also reap the benefits of tapping into their PLNs. When you have a large group of people combing through vast amounts of information and collectively identifying the most useful, entertaining, or valuable parts, it only makes sense to tap into this collective knowledge!

Muzy Offers a Neat Way to Blog With Pictures Muzy is a neat blogging service that offers a neat way to blog with pictures and text. Muzy offers more than two dozen apps for manipulating and displaying your pictures. If you don't have pictures that you want to share you can use the integrated image search to find images to write about and share. Beyond the picture apps Muzy offers text apps that you can use for writing short blog entries. When you first visit the Muzy website you'll see a pop-up box asking you to sign-in with a Facebook account. Applications for Education Muzy's integrated image search could be used by students to create a collage of images about a place, person, or event that they're studying. Muzy's T.O.S. requires users to be 13 or older.

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