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The First Creative Writing School on the Internet

The First Creative Writing School on the Internet
Writers.com has been offering online writing classes in all genres since 1995 -- the first writing school on the Internet. Our web site has been visited by writers from over one hundred ninety-five countries. Our classes are taught by published, working writers who are also experienced teachers. We can help you improve your skills, explore new directions, ready your work for publication, or simply provide a community, inspiration and deadlines to start you writing and keep you writing. Online Writing Classes Writers.com classes run the gamut from basic skills to advanced-level work in a variety of areas. Follow Us On Facebook Discover deals, news and literary inspiration via our Facebook page. Whoa... Free Writing Groups, Writing Tips and More Access our free writers' groups. To receive our schedule of writing classes, please subscribe to our mailing list. Related:  writing websites & blogsAdvice to writersför skrivande

Where the Writers Go to Write - Writing.Com Warren Buffett’s 10 Steps To Better Report Writing Buffett writes like he speaks. Direct, immediate and without pretension. “For more than forty years, I’ve studied the documents that public companies file. Too often, I’ve been unable to decipher just what is being said or, worse yet, had to conclude that nothing was being said. If corporate lawyers and their clients follow the advice in this handbook, my life is going to become much easier. “ Warren Buffet In 2002, I found the Plain Language writing technique almost by accident. Ever read an annual report from Warren Buffet. Audience Analysis worksheets. From the handbook: There are several possible explanations as to why I and others sometimes stumble over an accounting note or indenture description. It’s a great read and you can download it here www.sec.gov/pdf/handbook.pdf in PDF. Write Business Proposals in clear English So, with this in mind, I wrote this short guide to help you write Business Proposals in clear English. 1. 2. Identify your target audience i.e. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Protagonize: Collaborative creative writing community - fiction, poetry, stories, and great reading! Beyond The Margins |  Welcome to Writing-World.com! The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts. The blank white page. Mark Twain once said, “Show, don’t tell.” Finding a really good muse these days isn’t easy, so plan on going through quite a few before landing on a winner. There are two things more difficult than writing. It’s so easy to hide in your little bubble, typing your little words with your little fingers on your little laptop from the comfort of your tiny chair in your miniature little house. It’s no secret that great writers are great readers, and that if you can’t read, your writing will often suffer. Available in print withThe Best of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Interactive Storytelling for English Exams | EslbrainEslbrain How much can we actually teach students for exams without being exam-oriented? Wherever we go in professional development the reality of teaching to the test always crops up as something to avoid or get around somehow. Yet, we want our students to achieve high standards and we want them to have qualifications. For me, it’s a matter of teaching BEYOND the test. ********************************************************** Exposing them to real English before they ever see exam-type structures, whilst getting them used to such structures in fun, stress-free environments is a great way to raise competency well before exam deadlines loom ahead. This is a topic I wish to expand upon and develop through my blog in upcoming features. Here is the recording of my presentation: Here is the powerpoint to go with the presentation: The Art of questioning: One thing I wanted to develop further was the art of questioning. I love this quote about ‘minds-on’ learning by Neil Stephenson at www.teachinquiry.com by

DRAFT - Opinionator John Wells and I have been together a very long time. If you haven’t heard of Wells, he’s a C.I.A. operative who plays the starring role in a series of espionage thrillers that I started writing a decade ago. Random House published the first, “The Faithful Spy,” in 2006. I planned to kill Wells off at its end, a la John le Carre’s Alec Leamas. But my editor told me I couldn’t end with a fade to black, that I’d have to have a funeral. I found I couldn’t write the scene. Since then, Wells has proven too tough to die, or maybe too mean. Wells predates my wife, Jackie, and our daughter, Lucy. All of which is another way of saying that John Wells has markedly enriched my life — an impressive feat for a man who doesn’t exist.

6 Ways to Hook Your Readers Although I consider myself an avid reader, I must admit I have a short attention span when it comes to getting into books. If you fail to grab my attention in the first few lines, I start spacing out. Most readers are like me. Most people don’t want to spend the first 50 pages trying to get into a book. Here are a few things I find annoying in the first lines of a story: Dialogue. The last thing you want to do as a writer is annoy or bore people. (N.B. 1. Put a question in your readers’ minds. “Those old cows knew trouble was coming before we did.” 2. By starting at an important moment in the story, your reader is more likely to want to continue so he or she can discover what will happen next. “It was dark where she was crouched but the little girl did as she’d been told.” 3. Description is good when it encourages people to paint a picture in their minds. “Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.” 4. 5. “They had flown from England to Minneapolis to look at a toilet.” 6.

Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy | Center for Teaching & Learning | UNC Charlotte Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. From: KC Metro [old link, no longer functioning?] Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the way people learn into three domains. One of these is the cognitive domain, which emphasizes intellectual outcomes. This domain is further divided into categories or levels. From: UMUC From: Stewards Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy. ©2001 St. From: GA Tech According to Benjamin Bloom, and his colleagues, there are six levels of cognition: Ideally, each of these levels should be covered in each course and, thus, at least one objective should be written for each level. Below are examples of objectives written for each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy and activities and assessment tools based on those objectives.

Write and Improve: An Online writing helper Writing is probably the most difficult area for learners to improve on by themselves. Writing demands an audience and if you have no-one to tell you how successful your efforts are – or not – then you are doomed to repeat your failures into eternity. Cambridge English have, however, just released a beta version of an online, browser based writing helper. Currently free to use and requiring only a facebook login (or email registration), the service allows learners to input their answers to one of the five questions provided (or submit a piece of writing of their own choice) and to get feedback on their efforts. In the screenshot above, the highlighted text at the bottom of the image is the submitted text. You’ll also notice the “tabs” under the heading Detailed Feedback these are meant to provide a closer look at what errors the writer has made and give suggestions for improving them: As it stands, the feedback it gives is primarily linguistic and syntactical. So who should use this tool?

Writing Fiction and Nonfiction Draft is a series about the art and craft of writing. When I wrote my second novel, I biked in New York City’s Riverside Park and plopped myself down where my character died in order to take in what she saw as her life ebbed. When I wrote my first nonfiction book, in one of more than 200 interviews, I grilled a woman about why she quit a sought-after job in Washington to live in Paris. I write fiction. My first work of fiction evolved as collateral damage sown from bitter experience. Five pages turned into 50 and — we’re talking 2005, chicklit’s glory moment — I began to think I might start a novel about a celebrity’s taking over a magazine, which is what happened to me when Rosie O’Donnell landed at McCall’s. On my second novel, I decided to move further from the familiar and wrote a book narrated by a dead character. Writing fiction, for me, was all about control. Brandon Schaefer A novel, on the other hand, must be true primarily on a gut level.

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