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15 creative & respectful ways to quiet a class

15 creative & respectful ways to quiet a class
Have you fallen into the trap of saying “No talking!” or “I need quiet!” all day long? It’s exhausting to keep repeating your requests for silence, and after the hundredth time, kids just tune you out, anyway. There have been some great discussions about how to get students to quiet down on my Facebook page, and I want to share what’s worked for those teachers as well as what I’ve tried in my own classroom. Contributors’ names are written in parentheses where applicable. 1. 2. 3. Here are some other ideas for sound signals: (Note: all links go to Amazon so you can see a wide variety of instruments and choose the one you like best. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. You can also check out my list of 50 fun call and response ideas to get students’ attention. Remember there is no “magic bullet” that will get all students’ attention all of the time. My Favorite Behavior Management Resources on Pinterest Angela Watson's Teaching IdeasBehavior ManagementFollow On

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50 fun call-and-response ideas to get students’ attention Call-and-response is a time-tested technique for getting attention, not just in classrooms but in the military, in churches, at sports events, and in traditional cultures in various parts of the world. Instead of repeating yourself, train students to respond to a fun or inspiring statement! Here are some tips for creating your own call-and-response: Clap or snap in patterns and have students repeat the patterns back. Using familiar songs and beats (from popular music or children’s songs) really gets kids’ attention.Sing or play a song or rhyme. 25 Chatty Class Classroom Management Strategies for Overly Talkative Students Have a chatty class? Do your talkative students get louder and louder during small groups until it feels like chaos? Do they talk when you're talking then ask you what the directions were as soon as you finish? Don't worry.

Getting Control of a VERY DIFFICULT CLASS Have you ever had a class that just tried your patience day after day? Have you ever felt like you could walk away from teaching forever tomorrow, and be fine with it? This year, I have one of the most challenging classes I have ever had. I am still working on training them to do what I want them to do, but I know that in the end, I will win! Friends of Reading : 5 Ways to Deescalate Upset Students in your Classroom When I left the Vegas conference I was filled with excitement and a driving force behind how I can begin to find my new voice for this blog. Leaving the classroom for administration has changed my focus and I want to share with you some of the things I am doing with my staff. I want to give a BIG shout out to the very lovely Mrs. Spangler from Mrs.

30 Techniques to Quiet a Noisy Class One day, in front 36 riotous sophomores, I clutched my chest and dropped to my knees like Sergeant Elias at the end of Platoon. Instantly, dead silence and open mouths replaced classroom Armageddon. Standing up like nothing had happened, I said, "Thanks for your attention -- let's talk about love poems." What to do when a student constantly refuses to work There’s at least one in every classroom–yep, I’m talking about the kid who just sits there, and doesn’t work. The one who needs constant cajoling to put pencil to paper and get started. In some cases, there’s an attitude problem and the student is disengaged from school in general, and in other cases, the student just lacks focus or self-discipline.

Simple Punch Cards for Positive Behavior Support - Mrs. Richardson's Class Positive behavior reinforcement is always something I strived to improve in my classroom. It always seemed like I was whipping out an old trick from a seasoned teacher to try. Sometimes a new, simple concept to reward behavior was just what I needed to get my students back on track after a long weekend or sugar filled holiday. How to undo your classroom management mistakes I remember volunteering at my church’s Sunday School program many years ago and filling in as the assistant to one of the second grade Sunday School teachers. There were 29 kids in a very tiny, windowless classroom, and we were about to serve them animal crackers and juice. I had prepared 29 little portions plus one extra for the kid who inevitably would spill theirs, and had everything lined up on a tray. I looked at the teacher and was just about to ask whether she wanted to select a few kids to come pass things out or if she wanted to call the kids over by tables, when she picked up the tray and yelled loudly, “Okaaaaay, kids, come and get your animal crackerrrrsssss!!”

About Smart Classroom Management Here at Smart Classroom Management, we believe in two principles thought by many to be on contradictory ends of the classroom management spectrum. On one side we believe in faithfully following a classroom management plan. This allows teachers to hold students accountable without yelling, scolding, lecturing, or using any other stressful or hurtful method. On the other side we believe in creating a classroom that students love being part of, that they’re excited to come to every day. This combination of strength and joy holds the key to effective classroom management.

6 Opening and Closing Routines for New Teachers Routines and consistency matter greatly and are necessary for creating a smooth learning environment in your classroom. Routines help with creating community, checking for understanding, and managing the classroom. I'm going to share three opening routines and three closing routines that you can start using in your next class. Opening Routines If students come in and know that they will be required to write, read, or share at the launch of the lesson, then they enter the room already anticipating that there is an immediate expectation. (The same goes for closing routines and winding down your lesson.)

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