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Michael Sandel: Why we shouldn't trust markets with our civic life

Michael Sandel: Why we shouldn't trust markets with our civic life

http://www.ted.com/talks/michael_sandel_why_we_shouldn_t_trust_markets_with_our_civic_life.html

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Collared or Untied: Reflections on Work in American Culture 1.Fred Armisen opened the first season of the TV show Portlandia singing “The Dream of the 90s is Alive in Portland,” a dream of pierced, tattooed folks hanging out, hot girls wearing glasses and putting images of birds on everything, and grown-ups making a living making coffee. He asks Carrie Brownstein if she remembers the ’90s, when people were unambitious and “they had no occupations whatsoever.” “I thought that died out a long time ago,” she says, wonderingly, before she leaves L.A. to join Armisen’s ragged troupe of relaxed and minimally-employed folks dedicated to the art of skateboarding.

Unpaid Labor, On Purpose: Why We Volunteer At the San Francisco literacy center where I work, I see more than 40 volunteers every week. They drive an hour from Intel or ride the bus from high school to read with a kid for at least 45 minutes for $0. Some are required to volunteer as part of a class, but most are there of their own free will. 15 Fascinating TED Talks for Econ Geeks - AccountingDegree.com If you dream of a career in accounting, economics or finance, there’s a pretty good chance you love learning more about the global economy, monetary decision-making and other fiscal topics. Through these talks, you’ll get to hear some of the world’s foremost experts on behavior, economics, and politics discuss a wide range of issues, from inequality to consumerism– often with an interesting and unique take on the subject matter that’s perfect for stimulating your inner (and not-so-inner) geek. Loretta Napoleoni: The intricate economics of terrorism: You might be surprised at the economic and political issues that go on behind terrorist organizations.

THE FINANCIAL PHILOSOPHER: Foundations vs 'Castles in the Air' "I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness.

Last Word On Mozilla I wrote about the Mozilla CEO termination thing (I, II, III). The point of my writing on it was just to continue my long-standing project of pointing out that most procedural arguments — by which I mean content-neutral and substance-neutral arguments nominally divorced from policy and cultural preferences — are not serious. It seems to me that most people have some extreme limit to the kind of processes they are willing to use, but within that limit, they just use and find arguments for whatever processes lean towards their preferred substantive outcomes. In making this point, I have not (as you would expect) tried to make some procedural justification for firing people for their political views. I have not tried to make some procedural justification for market coercion or civil coercion. Truth be told, my actual procedural view (to the extent that I have one here) is that market coercion is a horrible thing that should be stamped out as much as possible.

How economic growth has become anti-life Limitless growth is the fantasy of economists, businesses and politicians. It is seen as a measure of progress. As a result, gross domestic product (GDP), which is supposed to measure the wealth of nations, has emerged as both the most powerful number and dominant concept in our times. However, economic growth hides the poverty it creates through the destruction of nature, which in turn leads to communities lacking the capacity to provide for themselves. The concept of growth was put forward as a measure to mobilise resources during the second world war.

Why Everybody Who Doesn’t Hate Bitcoin Loves It: Full Transcript This is a transcript of the Freakonomics Radio podcast “Why Everybody Who Doesn’t Hate Bitcoin Loves It.” [MUSIC: Greg Ruby Quartet, “Swing for Dudley” (from Look Both Ways)] Stephen J. DUBNER: Hey, podcast listeners. ‘Slomo’ Slomo came into my life at an opportune moment. Having just rolled into my 30s, I was looking for both a film subject and some wisdom on how to approach the encroaching “middle third” of my life — the years when youthful idealism is so often blunted by adult responsibilities. Around this time, during a business trip to San Diego, my father had a chance meeting on the Pacific Beach boardwalk with John Kitchin, an old medical school classmate. My dad barely recognized Dr.

Peer-to-peer rental: The rise of the sharing economy LAST night 40,000 people rented accommodation from a service that offers 250,000 rooms in 30,000 cities in 192 countries. They chose their rooms and paid for everything online. But their beds were provided by private individuals, rather than a hotel chain. The Great Philosophers 8: Theodor Adorno © Getty Theodor Wiesengrund Adorno was born in Frankfurt in 1903 into a wealthy and cultured family. His father, a wine merchant, was of Jewish origin but had converted to Protestantism at university.

Brigid Schulte’s Overwhelmed and our epidemic of busyness. Photo by Thinkstock Are you too busy? You should be, and you should let people know in a proud but exasperated tone. CHANGING ROLE OF THE ELITE CAPITALIST By Farid A. Khavari The United States is ruled by a plutocracy of the rich and superrich—the elite capitalists. Many things, both good and bad, can be attributed to elite capitalists. For instance, they create jobs (a good thing), yet they exploit the economy (a bad thing).

The evils of meritocracy © Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP/Press Association Images One of the few ambitions shared by politicians across the political spectrum is that of creating a fully meritocratic society, that is, a society in which all those who make it to the top do so only because of their own talents and abilities (rather than thanks to unfair privilege: upper-class parents, a friendship with the boss etc.). Throughout the Western world, all governments have (in theory!) the common goal of trying to create a hierarchy based on actual ability, replacing posh, chinless halfwits with the meritorious, wherever they may be found and whatever age, colour or gender they might be. © PA/PA Wire/Press Association Images This meritocratic ideal has brought opportunity to millions.

How economic news keeps us dumb and stops us changing the world In their more serious moods, news organisations tell us they want to explain the world to us. And that often means talking about money. There’s certainly a lot of information about money in the news: our eyes are regularly directed towards a variety of key indicators on the economic dashboard, including the money supply (M1, M2, MZM), central bank reserves, factory orders, the consumer price index (CPI), building permits, jobless claims, the deficit, the national debt and, most significantly of all, the GDP. © Petercam The complexity of the financial machine soon shuts most of us up.

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