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PBS Digital Studios

PBS Digital Studios

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weIQIthC3Ks

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Crush the "I'm Not Creative" Barrier - Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen by Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen | 10:50 AM May 7, 2012 Did you know that if you think you are creative, you’re more likely to actually be creative? This surprising fact pops up again and again in our research. In our database of over 6,000 professionals who have taken the Innovator’s DNA self & 360 assessments, people (entrepreneurs and managers alike) who “agree” with the survey statement “I am creative” consistently deliver disruptive solutions — by creating new businesses, products, services, and processes that no one has done before. They see themselves as creative and act that way.

Creativity Creep Every culture elects some central virtues, and creativity is one of ours. In fact, right now, we’re living through a creativity boom. Few qualities are more sought after, few skills more envied. Beer: creative thinking's old best friend (Photo: Raina + Wilson) Ernest Hemingway was a notorious drunkard. He’s also considered one of the 20th century’s greatest writers. How To Use 'App Smashing' In Education If you are a teacher that uses an iPad, chances are that you are familiar with the following scenario. You found this amazing app that can really help your struggling students. The potential of this app is great, as it appears that this particular app can tap your students’ creativity and allow them to thrive in ways that were unthinkable until now. The problem is that this app can only accomplish a small number of things, which prevents the students from completing a multidimensional project. So what do you do now?

Seth Godin on Vulnerability, Creative Courage, and How to Dance with the Fear: A Children’s Book for Grownups by Maria Popova “If you just pick one human you can change for the better, with work that might not work — that’s what art is.” At the 2014 HOW conference, Debbie Millman, host of the excellent interview show Design Matters and a remarkable mind, sat down with the prolific Seth Godin to discuss courage, anxiety, change, creative integrity, and why he got thrown out of Milton Glaser’s class. She used an unusual book of Godin’s as the springboard for their wide-ranging conversation: V is for Vulnerable: Life Outside the Comfort Zone (public library) — an alphabet book for grownups illustrated by Hugh MacLeod with a serious and rather urgent message about what it means and what it takes to dream, to live with joy, to find our purpose and do fulfilling work. I had the pleasure of seeing and recording the conversation — transcribed highlights below.

Jonah Lehrer Wasn’t the Only Journalist Shaping His Conclusions Finally and fatally, what ties the narrative together is not some real insight into the nature of Dylan’s art, but a self-help lesson: Take a break to recharge. To anyone versed in Dylan, this story was almost unrecognizable. Lehrer’s intellectual chutzpah was startling: His conclusions didn’t shed new light on the facts; they distorted or invented facts, with the sole purpose of coating an unrelated and essentially useless lesson with the thinnest veneer of plausibility. It’s the same way with the science that “proves” the lesson. Lehrer quotes one neuroscientist, Mark Beeman, as saying that “an insight is like finding a needle in a haystack”—presumably an insight like Dylan’s, though Beeman’s study hinges on puzzles. Ushering In the Creative Age - Chicago Policy Review Alan Freeman writes that the age of creation lies before us—if we can rediscover the lost art of investing in humans. Alan Freeman was the principal economist in the Greater London Authority’s Economic Analysis Unit from 2001 to 2011, and now writes and advises on cultural policy. While with the GLA’s intelligence unit, he produced a series of reports that defined the field of measuring the cultural and creative industry activity of large cities. These were Creativity: London’s Core Business, the first comprehensive study of London’s cultural and creative industries, five subsequent updates, and London: A Cultural Audit, a rigorous comparison of the cultural offer of London, Shanghai, Paris, New York and Tokyo. The ‘creative industries’, a term popularized by the 1997 British labor government, are a copywriters’ dream. They create wealth.

4 compelling ideas for using Book Creator in the classroom - Book Creator app Technology Coach Chris Loat shares his ideas on how Book Creator can be used effectively in the classroom. Chris Loat has taught for 16 years between grades 2-7, and recently moved to the district board office in Richmond, Canada, as a teacher consultant for the integration of technology. Book Creator is a versatile and intuitively set-up app that allows students to easily create digital content in a variety of ways. In Richmond, teachers have used their iPads and Book Creator to publish ebooks on a variety of topics and in a variety of genres. Mathematical beauty activates same brain region as great art or music People who appreciate the beauty of mathematics activate the same part of their brain when they look at aesthetically pleasing formula as others do when appreciating art or music, suggesting that there is a neurobiological basis to beauty. There are many different sources of beauty -- a beautiful face, a picturesque landscape, a great symphony are all examples of beauty derived from sensory experiences. But there are other, highly intellectual sources of beauty. Mathematicians often describe mathematical formulae in emotive terms and the experience of mathematical beauty has often been compared by them to the experience of beauty derived from the greatest art. In a new paper published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to image the brain activity of 15 mathematicians when they viewed mathematical formulae that they had previously rated as beautiful, neutral or ugly.

Jonah Lehrer Resigns From New Yorker Amid Scandal It’s been a rough couple of months for the science Wunderkind. Jonah Lehrer resigned today from his post at the New Yorker after acknowledging that he fabricated quotes in his most recent book, Imagine. His publisher is pulling the e-book that contains the misquotations and is halting production of physical copies. Lehrer admitted that quotes that he had attributed to Bob Dylan “either did not exist, were unintentional misquotations, or represented improper combinations of previously existing quotes.”

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