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Learning from a Pro: Best Practices for Facebook and Twitter

Learning from a Pro: Best Practices for Facebook and Twitter
Sorry, but the article or page you’re looking was not found. In May 2013, School Library Journal underwent a major server migration for its archived web content, which happened slightly sooner than originally expected. As a result, much of the content from 2004 to 2012 is currently unavailable to the public. However, this content has not been lost, and our web staff is in the process of converting these past articles for integration into the WordPress-based website you see here, which was launched in 2012. Many of these older articles have already been restored, and more will continue to be restored on an ongoing basis as they are cleaned up. Ultimately, this migration will allow for greater discoverability of all archived SLJ content, both on the website and across the Web in general. Keep in mind that the article you’re looking for may already have been restored to the new site.CLICK HERE TO SEARCH FOR IT BY TITLE (this link will open in a new browser).

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Related:  Technology in Education

Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: What Are the Roles of Teachers and Schools in Creating Responsible Participants? A participatory culture is a culture with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement, strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations, and some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices. A participatory culture is also one in which members believe their contributions matter, and feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least they care what other people think about what they have created). (3) According to Henry Jenkins, Director of Media Studies at MIT, this participatory culture is what our students live in outside of school, but what they are excluded from the minute they cross the threshold of formal education. Jenkins spends some time explaining the story of Blake Ross, a 14 year old who was inspired by his participation in the gaming environment of Sim City and created the Firefox web browser.

18 Free Mind Mapping Tools for Teachers and Students Mind mapping. concept mapping, or brainstorming are three different names with almost the same meaning : collecting,organizing , and representing ideas, tasks, words, or other items linked to and arranged around a central key word or idea into a mind map diagram . Whichever kind of mapping you want to label it , web 2.0 has some free tools for you to help you perform it. I have meticulously compiled a list of some of the best free mapping tools for teachers and students to use. Some pluses of using mind mapping tools in education : The following are some of the advantages of using mind mapping tools in education : Here is a list of free mind mapping tools for teachers :

Twihaiku? Micropoetry? The rise of Twitter poetry - Features - Books Benjamin Zephaniah is one of a new wave of poets using their Twitter account to tweet poems: “Intelligence may not mean intelligent/ The news may not be new/ From where we are/ To be awake/ May not mean/ To be conscious.” He says: “I like to send out little treats of poetry every now and then to make people think a little bit. It’s a great way to connect daily with your audience. It is a better way of saying, ‘I’m in the shop.’” When the mood takes him, George Szirtes, who won the TS Eliot Prize in 2004 for his collection Reel, will fire off couplets 140 characters a time. (“Should we close the door to keep the dusk out, asked child Helga.

Osaka JALT Language Teaching in Osaka Japan - The latest news and opions about language teaching - How I use QR codes in the classroom By Cameron Romney Over on the EdTech blog, Kimberly talks about Quick Response (QR) codes and how she uses them in the classroom. QR codes are something that I have been using for years and is something that I have talked about before (you might have seen one of my presentations about it at Tech Day), so I thought I would post something here on the Osaka JALT blog about them as well. Hands down my favorite use of a QR code in the classroom is to give the students the answers to their homework. In many of my classes I give the students a handout that has extra activities for in class on the front and a homework assignment on the back. Of course, with hundreds of students each week, I couldn’t be checking each assignment myself and I didn’t want to leave the students in the dark.

QR Code Classroom Implementation Guide QR Codes (Quick Response Codes) are just barcodes. There is nothing fancy about them. Just like the grocery store clerk uses barcodes to look up the product and scan the price into the computer, your mobile device or computer can look up QR codes to: take you to a website, read some text, give you a phone number, or generate a text message. QR Codes are barcodes of information that hardlink the physical world with the online world.

Social Networking with Students Educators all over the world connect with each other to grow and it benefits all of us. For whatever reason, though, students are often left out of the equation when it comes to social networking. There are many advantages to introducing your students to social networking. First, leveraging social networking gives students immense power to direct their own learning. Similar to how we choose what we want to learn by focusing our conversations online with those who have similar interests, students can find both like-minded students as well as experts.

All the Web 2.0 Tools you'll ever need in one blog post! I am web geek, and not just because I own a Foursquare t-shirt that I bought at a discount after my 1000th check in. The real reason I know I am a web geek is because I LOVE discovering cool web 2.0 tools that can enhance my classroom! I am about to share with you my not so secret sources for teacher Web 2.0 excitment! ...and that's not all! QR Codes: In the Classroom I’ve written previously about QR Codes, what they are, and how we might use them. I’ve met and chatted with Andy Ramsden of Bath University and seen how they have integrated them into the assignment and feedback process. I saw two links this morning on Twitter that sparked my interest again, both from @psychemedia which has made me realise that I need to brain-dump my thoughts on how these wonderful little codes can be utilised in the classroom. But first … I have found that there is something about the QR Code generation we ought to know about; this is Using a QR Code Generator (like qrcode.kaywa.com) means you can have the code store either a short URL or your contact details as text. Be warned: the more data you ask it to store the larger the final QR Code will be.

QR Huh? What The Heck Is A QR Code? Have you seen these around town where you are lately? I was a little surprised when I saw them all over the Black Friday ads back in November. This is a QR or Quick Response Code.

there are a lot of opinions, but sometimes it's important to think about how often we change what we think because of what we read. John by abkavanagh May 10

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