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10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship
YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Google (which owns YouTube) built the lessons to educate students about YouTube’s policies, how to flag content, how to be a safer online citizen, and protect their identities. Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery. Or you can download the Full Teacher’s Guide or the Full Set of Slides in PDF. The killer feature for this curriculum is the extra features that come with each video.

http://www.edudemic.com/10-interactive-lessons-by-google-on-digital-citizenship/

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SID2015: Safer Internet Day 2015-Participation – Education: Digital CitizenShip, CyberSecurity by Gust MEES Image credit: Safer Internet Day (SID) is organised by Insafe in February of each year to promote safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile phones, especially among children and young people across the world. Safer Internet Day 2015 will be celebrated on Tuesday 10 February 2015, with the strapline, once again, of ===> “Let’s create a better internet together” <=== following the success of last year’s campaign. This website showcases some of the exciting activities and events that took place to celebrate the day in 2014.

Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google At Google we believe in the power of education and the promise of technology to improve the lives of students and educators -- leading the way for a new generation of learning in the classroom and beyond. But no matter what subject you teach, it is important for your students to know how to think critically and evaluate online sources, understand how to protect themselves from online threats from bullies to scammers, and to think before they share and be good digital citizens. Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe, and also worked with educators themselves to develop lessons that will work in the classroom, are appropriate for kids, and incorporate some of the best advice and tips that Google's security team has to offer. Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth In this class, students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online. We are always looking to improve these classes.

Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google At Google we believe in the power of education and the promise of technology to improve the lives of students and educators -- leading the way for a new generation of learning in the classroom and beyond. But no matter what subject you teach, it is important for your students to know how to think critically and evaluate online sources, understand how to protect themselves from online threats from bullies to scammers, and to think before they share and be good digital citizens. Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe, and also worked with educators themselves to develop lessons that will work in the classroom, are appropriate for kids, and incorporate some of the best advice and tips that Google's security team has to offer. Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth In this class, students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online. We are always looking to improve these classes.

Infographic: Are You Revealing Too Much on Social Networks? Social-networking sites are a hacker's dream: a sometimes public online community where unsuspecting people post personal information. But what information can and should be posted on social networks? Cloud security firm Trend Micro examined popular social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Pinterest and found that most require identifying information like location, employment, birthday, and education. Tumblr is the only site that does not ask for any details, aside from username. According to Trend Micro, one in four Facebook users location-tag their posts each month, while 16 percent of Pinterest browsers offer their address. The two sites also carry the same average of 229 friends or followers.

A Design Thinking approach to Digital Citizenship Design Thinking is a problem solving methodology used by people all over the world to come up with new ideas. Recently there has been a lot of discussion about how to integrate this approach into education. This summer I took two Online courses to learn more about the process. I am very interested in ways to use this approach in my own teaching. This fall I decided to apply this approach to my 7th grade Digital Citizenship unit which focuses on cyberbullying. It worked really well. A Reading List for Digital Citizenship in Secondary Schools A recent university assignment investigating Digital Citizenship in Education studied in the Masters course, Knowledge networks and digital innovation, being studied through Charles Sturt University (CSU) required students to assess digital citizenship needs within their school environments and make recommendations for future directions. One element of the task was to prepare an annotated bibliography of essential reading for college leadership teams. This is the bibliography prepared by Helen Stower and myself. It contains some excellent resources for anyone considering digital citizenship priorities for secondary schools.

10 Tips for Cyber Smartness and Safety I have recently started a series of posts here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning featuring a set of interesting resources and tips for teachers to start a successful techy new school year. If you want to have a look at what we have already posted, check out this resource section. Today and as I was working on an article about cyber safety - which I will publish tomorrow-, I came across this handy guide outlining top ten tips for kids to stay safe online. The Internet doesn’t have a delete key Dave Taylor (Source: AskDaveTaylor.com) Guest post by Dave Taylor It’s something that I hear from teens all the time, the refrain that “it’s cool, I can just delete it if it’s a problem” when we’re talking about online safety, privacy and the risk associated with everything that’s posted online. They assure me that those pictures on Facebook, the awkward photo from the party last Saturday night, the angry Tweet, none of them are permanent so it’s no big deal. Unfortunately, they’re wrong.

2014 Recap: 15 Top Resources On Digital Citizenship Via Edudemic A lot of the facts you teach your students will be long forgotten by the time they reach graduation, but the hope is that the practical lessons — the ones that can benefit them for years to come — are the ones that will stick. Digital citizenship is something that can equip students for a lifetime of safe, responsible Internet use. How can you mold your students into stand-up digital citizens? Use these resources to help you plan your lessons.

5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship 5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship by Paul Barnwell, Teacher of English & Digital Media Students buzzed about the latest uproar on Instagram. Anonymous sources had posted a “questionable”–and NSFW–list for multiple public schools in our city on Instagram, leading to distraught girls, viral Twitter reactions, and an investigation. Welcome, Educators Administrators and teachers are urgently looking for a proven system that will guide them through the complexities of Web 2.0. Too often, events like cyberbullying, sexting, plagiarizing and hacking push litigious chaos into the forefront of technology adoption, essentially stunting the development of digital citizenship progress. In response to this real and palpable need, iKeepSafe offers you these resources: Dive Into Data Privacy and Security • iKeepSafe Privacy: builds confidence around how technology companies are handling student data. • Digital Compliance and Student Privacy: A Roadmap for Schools: Outlines steps to implementing privacy and security compliance programs. • Data Privacy and Schools: Outlining the Conversation: Examines challenges related to managing data privacy and security in schools. • General Overview and Positioning Paper: iKeepSafe and Data Security: Discusses security protections for data collected by educational institutions. Brush Up on Hot Topics

How You Can Become a Champion of Digital Citizenship in Your Classroom My students often travel with me when I lead professional development at conferences. A few weeks ago, eight-year-old Carson Griffin (pictured here to the right) was helping me lead a session for teachers on “iPads for Elementary Learners,” and we were talking about our classroom Twitter account as it applies to digital citizenship. I called Carson to the front of the room to share his thoughts on Digital Citizenship, and his response gave me goosebumps. “You should never post anything negative about a teacher, coach, or others on social media because they could find it and you will feel foolish,” he said. The "New and Improved" Digital Citizenship Survival Kit I have been thinking about some "new" items I could add to my original Digital Citizenship Kit that I created last year. Like I said in that blog post, I love using props when teaching. After some great conversations with the good wife @jenbadura on what I should include, I have come up with some new items to include in the survival kit. Yes, you can use this with your students! After I blogged about the original kit, I had a plethora of teachers email me or send me a tweet me asking if it was okay to use this idea at their school.

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