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The University for Peace

The University for Peace
University for Peace The United Nations mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) was created in December 1980. The headquarters of the UPEACE system is in Costa Rica, the country which initiated the process for the establishment of the University. UPEACE activities include: teaching, research, distance learning, and outreach. UPEACE offers Master’s Degree Programmes in Peace and Conflict Studies for students from all parts of the world, students receive a high quality education in a unique atmosphere with a focus on multicultural perspectives, theory and practical applications.

http://www.upeace.org/

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U Calgary: Peace Studies Calgary Peace Prize 2014 Eighth Annual Uprising National Playwriting Competition: Peace, Politics and Society (2013) The Consortium for Peace Studies and Downstage Theatre in collaboration with the School for the Creative and Performing Arts (University of Calgary) are proud to announce the winners of the eighth annual Uprising National Playwriting Competition: Peace, Politics and Society (2013). Conciliation Resources News Apr 2014 Legitimacy matters for peace. It defines the social and political deals between states and citizens, and local leaders and communities. The new edition of Accord focuses on legitimacy, and the ways that it can help build more equitable and sustainable peace. The Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) has abducted over 3,400 Congolese people since 2008.

Magna Carta Magna Carta was the first document forced onto a King of England by a group of his subjects, the feudal barons, in an attempt to limit his powers by law and protect their rights. The charter is widely known throughout the English speaking world as an important part of the protracted historical process that led to the rule of constitutional law in England and beyond. The 1215 charter required King John to proclaim certain liberties and accept that his will was not arbitrary—for example by explicitly accepting that no "freeman" (in the sense of non-serf) could be punished except through the law of the land, a right that still exists. The name Runnymede may be derived from the Anglo-Saxon 'runieg' (regular meeting) and 'mede' (mead or meadow), describing a place in the meadows used to hold regular meetings.

Study + Practice of Dialogue Chief Robert Joseph Tribute Video Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents a tribute video for Chief Robert Joseph. Chief Joseph is the recipient of SFU's 2014 Jack P. We Are the 99 Percent 14th October 2013 Question with 172 notes Anonymous asked: How can you claim to speak for 99% of people? United States Constitution The Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787, by the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and ratified by conventions in eleven States. It went into effect on March 4, 1789.[2] Since the Constitution was adopted, it has been amended twenty-seven times. The first ten amendments (along with two others that were not ratified at the time) were proposed by Congress on September 25, 1789, and were ratified by the necessary three-fourths of the States on December 15, 1791.[3] These first ten amendments are known as the Bill of Rights. The Constitution is interpreted, supplemented, and implemented by a large body of constitutional law.

Guide to MA Program in Peace and Conflict Resolution and Related Fields Dear Colleagues Many individuals around the world are interested in doing graduate work in Peace and Conflict Resolution at the MA or Ph.D. level. This guide is for MA level programs. For Ph.D. programs see the resource guide There are several excellent existing guides to finding programs listed below (Please note that no guide provides complete up-to-date information on all programs, thus please feel free to suggest additional programs and also do your own research). Before looking through the guides, readers are strongly encouraged to read carefully through the free report Graduate Education and Professional Practice in International Peace and Conflict (2010. by Nike Carstarphen, Craig Zelizer, Robert Harris and David J. Smith.

Rights Rights are legal, social, or ethical principles of freedom or entitlement; that is, rights are the fundamental normative rules about what is allowed of people or owed to people, according to some legal system, social convention, or ethical theory.[1] Rights are of essential importance in such disciplines as law and ethics, especially theories of justice and deontology. Rights are often considered fundamental to civilization, being regarded as established pillars of society and culture,[2] and the history of social conflicts can be found in the history of each right and its development. According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, "rights structure the form of governments, the content of laws, and the shape of morality as it is currently perceived.

ADR Graduate Programs Graduate Programs in the Field of Conflict Resolution At the Center for Conflict Resolution we have compiled a online database of Universities that offer Graduate Programs in the field of Conflict Resolution (Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, Conflict Resolution, Peace Studies, etc.). This database is divided into two sections: one dedicated to programs in the United States and the second is comprised of international programs. To search the Database for University Graduate Programs in the United States click on the map of the US below (or click here) To search the Database for University Graduate Programs throughout the world click on the picture of the globe below (or click here)

Enneagram of Personality History[edit] The origins and historical development of the Enneagram of Personality are matters of dispute. Wiltse and Palmer[6] have suggested that similar ideas to the Enneagram of Personality are found in the work of Evagrius Ponticus, a Christian mystic who lived in 4th century Alexandria. Evagrius identified eight logismoi ("deadly thoughts") plus an overarching thought he called "love of self".

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